Homemade humidifer

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by exhaust_49, Mar 1, 2008.

  1. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I'm planning to put a bunch of holes in about 4 film canisters (made of plastic, camera film comes in them). What is the best way of doing this? I was going to just carefully take a nail and hammer it through a bunch of times. Any suggestions? I'm using these small plastic tubes because there small enough to fit anywhere I need (under the headstock, beside the neck, behind the neck heel.
     
  2. Brion

    Brion Supporting Member

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    Use a small diameter drill bit for a clean look.
     
  3. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I was thinking of using a small drill bit to make the holes but I was a bit concerned about the bit glancing off the round side.
     
  4. Sherman

    Sherman Supporting Member

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    Another thought that is not as labor instensive is to find some netting (the stuff that cherry tomatoes come in is what I use) and put a quarter of an apple in it. Then hang it in the guitar between the strings and you're good to go. The downside is that if you're guitar has enough moisture the apple can mold over but you should be checking the humidity anyway and if it's fine then you should take out the apple. I've been doing this for several years now with good results. My guitars have been properly humidified and they also smell good - lol.
     
  5. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    Humidifiers are pretty cheap, you know. Oasis humidifiers are under $20, and are safe, reliable, and hold more water than anything you'll be able to make on your own. Sponge filled homemade devices will need refilling every day in the dry season. There are plenty of ways to make your own, but for $17/instrument I can't imagine it not being worth just buying a good one.
     

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