Homemade vocal booth?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by codyprang, Jan 22, 2008.


  1. codyprang

    codyprang Member

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    I was wondering if anybody has any suggestions for making a homemade vocal booth, or something that would make the vocals as absolutely dry as possible. Since I've been recording everything in one room, when I add compression to the vocals, it raises the natural reverberation of the room. Does anybody have a cheap homemade solution for this?
     
  2. nosignal

    nosignal Member

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    i have found that it helps to put blankets or something behind the mic so the person singing is singing into towels or blankets. i've used it with success many times
     
  3. codyprang

    codyprang Member

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    Thanks, I'll give it a try. I feel like some songs are just neccessary to have dry vocals, and I haven't been able to achieve that.
     
  4. nosignal

    nosignal Member

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    yeah i like having dry vocals for the most part, usually ill have the person sing a dry take and then if they feel a certain part needs to have more atmosphere to it ill have them take a few steps back and do the take again. and mix the two
     
  5. JohnM

    JohnM Member

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    Make sure the ceiling isn't right above the vocalist's head. Give it a couple of feet, even if there is acoustic foam on it. Otherwise it can get really boxy in the mids.
     
  6. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    Probably the cheapest makeshift booth you could make would be to:
    • Mount some foam on a spot of your ceiling (middle of the room will be best for having the lowest amplitude of early reflections)...you can construct a holder for rigid fiberglass too...will be cheaper and will work a bit better than foam.
    • Mount some hooks in your ceiling (put them on anchors)...suround the area that you mounted the foam/insulation.
    • Get some moving blankets or heavy theater curtains and install eyelets in them
    • Hang the blankets when you want to track vocals. If it's not dead enough, add more blankets...and maybe a rug.
    This will reduce the reflections from your walls...

    Cheers

    Kris
     
  7. cram

    cram Member

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    http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php

    Go there.

    Construction forum - http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=2&sid=9f076d5cc98fbdf516000fa0ce84dc72

    For instance - http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=7305&highlight=vocal+booth

    That is a good account of someone doing it.

    There are so many examples there to draw from. Why it's, it's my graceland...

    UPDATE - re read that you're looking for mostly cheap alternatives to get a dry sounding vocal recording... The wife got me this book http://www.amazon.com/Acoustic-Desi...d_bbs_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201023503&sr=8-2

    It has several suggestions on this end of things.

    Golden Rule - I've learned a lot in the last year about building studio construction. People always come into it with intent to keep it cheap, but it's so easy to waste money and time on things that don't work. Do research to make sure what you end up doing is going to work. Doing that up front, will save so much money and time.

    There is soooo much misinformation out there about acoustics. manufacturers marketing products are doing it too. finding an acredited review of a product before you buy is important as well.
     
  8. codyprang

    codyprang Member

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    One thing I'm worried about is definitely doing things that are unneccessary, or unhelpful. I'm going to have to look into it a lot more. I appreciate the feedback though.
     

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