How can I tighten the Jack on my Tokai 335 copy?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by big jilm, Dec 16, 2009.

  1. big jilm

    big jilm Supporting Member

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    Can't get behind it to hold the jack! Posted this under general guitar info too. I know there is a tool made to do this, but I have rehersal tonight. Anyone have a method?
     
  2. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Silver Supporting Member

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    You're going to have to get that sucker out of there, then put a new star washer on the jack. I can tell you how to fish it back in if you like, but essentially this is what's keeping you from being able to tighten it up, as it's (I'll bet) simply trying to rotate, which will pull on the lead, possibly breaking the connection.

    Depending on the guitar, sometimes, if your fingers are long enough you can put pressure on the jack in order to prevent it from rotating, allowing you to get it snug enough "for gov'ment work"
     
  3. big jilm

    big jilm Supporting Member

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  4. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    or, you can just grab one of these
    [​IMG]
    and jam it into the jack, where it will keep said jack from turning while you tighten the nut with a little crescent wrench.
     
  5. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Silver Supporting Member

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    Clever

    Simple

    ...never even crossed my mind,

    Damn - good one, that.;)
     
  6. NoahL

    NoahL Member

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    In some cavities, there's not much room for a crescent wrench, even a little one. I saw my luthier wedge an awl against the nut and into the wood of the cavity (not far, just enough to hold the nut) and then tighten the assembly by turning the whole jack from the outside with a reamer like the one in Walter's picture. The trick here is first orienting the jack so when it gets truly tight, the lugs are in the right place for your soldering -- or that the wires (if already soldered) aren't twisted. Just another approach I've seen.
     

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