How close can you come to this tone with a modeler or a vst?

Discussion in 'Digital & Modeling Gear' started by kyolic, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. kyolic

    kyolic Member

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    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/28509587/move_on_solo.mp3

    This is the solo part from the song "Move On" of Revolution album by Andy Timmons.

    Now before going "Ah that it is easily achievable by just selecting a Mesa and the relevant cabinet, that's how you do Andy Timmons tone, he uses Mesa's", please listen to it really carefully. First of all notice how each note is heard clearly without the slightest trace of any mud no matter what part of the keyboard is played. Besides, pay attention to the hugely organic and three dimensional vibe making it extremely pleasant for the ear even though there is considerable amount of gain present. Also notice the depth it has without any undesirable comb filtering or boxiness or nasalness going on. Also pay attention to how balanced it is. There isn't any frequency range that disturbes the balance by overflowing. It is so right in every aspect.

    Note to the "Tone is in the fingers boy, you wouldn't sound half good even you were there in the studio behind that exact gear" guys: I would.

    So let's just keep "it's in his fingers" motto out of the discussion but analyze the tone technically instead and decide if it is actually achievable by a modeler or a vst.
     
  2. mattball826

    mattball826 Member

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    other than using his gear, his guitar, his strings, his pick, his studio, and his engineer teams i doubt a modeler can duplicate the sound.

    you want to go after a sound of a rig? record just the rig in mono. no backing tracks, no mix, no clone tracking and spacially widening them with panning. no stacking tracks which really cleans up a lot of guitar tracks since gain is additive and they start with lower gain while tracking, then often stacking and cloning tracks for desired results in a mix. then they really clean up things with chandler, manley, etc $10k outboard analog processors and compressors.

    other than that, a pod, gsp, axe fx, kpa, etc should come close.
     
  3. FPFL

    FPFL Member

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    If you have hands and ears good enough to play that I'm utterly at a loss as to why you care about amps versus modelling.

    the thing about modellers is you still have to understand how to get the tone "there", as the above post mentions.

    The song doesn't ship with the guitar and studio mix information (wish it did!)
    Modern modelling on the high end can get you there if you know where "\there is in the first place. I've heard plenty of AF2 clips like that but they were also mixed, not just raw solo tracks. That clip has studio polish too.

    -P
     
  4. Lele

    Lele Member

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    The great tone of Andy Timmons album "Resolution" come from 2 amps played at the same time: a ‘68 Marshall Plexi Super Lead panned on one side of the stereo field and a ‘79 Marshall JMP panned on the other side, both with V30 speakers and SM57 mics. You can find many information on the web about this. So it's true that you would need 2 tracks to get the same results, or you should play in mono to hide the pan effect. I like a lot that album and that tone, but imho opinion I hear a lot of a kind of comb filtering and some phase cancellation due to the same guitar signal playing 2 amps. Obviously this effect was used in a constructive way, with a very good result, but listening to the track in mono is mandatory to create it with a single amp.
    That said, I'm not so sure that this compressed and somehow dark tone would be so cutting, in a denser rock mix with other instruments, unlike the Resolution album.
     
  5. kyolic

    kyolic Member

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