How computers ruined rock music

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by LP Freak, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. LP Freak

    LP Freak Supporting Member

    Messages:
    712
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Location:
    Chicago
  2. Bieling3

    Bieling3 Member

    Messages:
    2,978
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    Location:
    Ithaca
    Declining testosterone levels in the Male of the species is the real culprit.
     
    mcmurray, Balls, ntotoro and 66 others like this.
  3. Thinline_slim

    Thinline_slim Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,982
    Joined:
    May 8, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    I blame the musicians, engineers and producers who sit at the computers.
     
    NamaEnsou, sxcustom, sleep and 17 others like this.
  4. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

    Messages:
    4,064
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2011
    Location:
    mars
    Rock music was gone before computers entered the equation. What killed rock music was the music industry forsaking talented artists in favor of bands that fit the contrived stereotype of "rock" and preferring hair bands, metal, grunge, and punk.
    The industry moved away from innovation and musical skill and toward easy to sell parodies. And some previous rock bands bought into it. Look at ZZ Top, they went from being a rock band that was about great musicianship and creativity to a band that was about an absurd image of guitars . chicks, and beards.

    And of course that led to silly things like "rawk" and the devil horn thing, and guys thinking that to be in a band they had to have an insane amount of tramp stamps and a face that looks like they fell into a tackle box. And of course during the late 70s and into the 80s the strangely androgynous hair band hairdos that made men look effeminate and wearing leotards, and of course bands like Kiss, who were the Archies of the 70s and once again, a parody act with their comic books and Kiss barbie dolls.

    What happened to rock was it fell prey to Madison Avenue.
    Computers didn't destroy rock, they destroyed everything that took its' place.
    The reality is there are some great bands out there with a rock attitude, but most people will never hear of them, or if they do they will think the bands are not "cool" because they don't fit the madison avenue stereotypes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
  5. LP Freak

    LP Freak Supporting Member

    Messages:
    712
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Location:
    Chicago
    Johnny Bravo
     
  6. aiq

    aiq Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,093
    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Location:
    Northern Gulf Coast
    “Well, the airplane’s done it!”

    “It wasn’t the airplane who killed the beast, it was beauty that killed the beast.”
     
    Jon Silberman and frijoleghost like this.
  7. Scanloni

    Scanloni Member

    Messages:
    538
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2018
    Nothing can “ruin rock music”. The same instruments exist today that existed when rock was at its peak popularity. Musicians are free to create whatever type if music they choose.
    Listeners simply have more choices now and enjoy other forms of music more than rock.
     
  8. slybird

    slybird Member

    Messages:
    6,020
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2014
    Sometimes Beato spews BS out of his mouth. This is one of those times.
     
  9. cugel

    cugel Member

    Messages:
    4,204
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Location:
    eugene oregon
    Its a good video but RB should listen to Ministry's Psalm 69. Sure seems like it kicks ass to me (and don't get all excited PW guys, that ain't CCM)
     
  10. Sam Xavier

    Sam Xavier Member

    Messages:
    1,830
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2018
    Location:
    Wath upon Dearne, UK
    All that happened - IMO, of course - is some bright spark found a winning formula and flogged it to death, same as any other genre. Rock became a victim of its own success.

    The good news is, as Scanloni and Rockledge noted, there are still many great bands and musicians out there. Same with just about any genre, you only have to dig a bit deeper.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
  11. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Member

    Messages:
    4,283
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2011
    Location:
    Texas
    Yeah, the advent of digital perfection has made listening to modern music a chore, much of the time. I much prefer a warts-and-all approach.
     
  12. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

    Messages:
    4,064
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2011
    Location:
    mars
    It isn't in the instruments and tools, it is in the mindset. And mindsets toward music are generational. The rock generation is either geriatric or dead now. Some younger artists such as Chris Robinson and Steve Wilson get the rock mindset and do it well. But they are far and few between.
    Young people deserve to be proud of their own musical mindset and the culture that goes with it, and shouldn't be saddled with trying to live up to some "rock" ideology.
     
  13. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

    Messages:
    4,064
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2011
    Location:
    mars
    Honestly, there weren't a lot of warts in the music during the rock era. Rock musicians tended to be perfectionists, and more importantly rock era producers were perfectionists. Guys like George Martin, Bill Mxypstlk, Glynn Johns, and Bob Ezrin aimed for perfection. And got it.
    I hear a lot of modern music that can get a very analog era sound out of computers doing rock era music. That Greta Van Fleet album sounds like it could have been recorded in 1975.
    When artists don't resort to compression poisoning they can get some great sounds out of digital gear. But doing that isn't very vogue now.

    The technology is fine. The problem is that those using it have gotten lazy and abuse it for the purpose of taking the short cut instead of taking the scenic route.
     
    Hoth, Harley90, art_z and 8 others like this.
  14. 8len8

    8len8 Member

    Messages:
    10,222
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Location:
    Chicago
    Tools and equipment are never to blame. It’s the users of that equipment that’s to blame.
     
  15. Scanloni

    Scanloni Member

    Messages:
    538
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2018
    Exactly. Rock isn’t and never will be dead. People just don’t enjoy it as much as they used to. People play snd listen to what they like.
     
  16. ghostnote

    ghostnote Member

    Messages:
    440
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Rock music WAS gone before computers entered the equation but the major labels NEVER favored punk. Rock music was well on its way to going corporate long before computers and as told in the movie Almost Famous.
    The hyper commercialization of rock was fueled by MTV when the major labels figured out how to use this new medium. Being major labels they were slow to catch on.

    Originally, MTV played videos of lesser known and up and coming artists. The Go Go's were one of the original west coast punkers who just happened to break at the same time that MTV launched. Go Go's popularity was greatly enhanced by their frequent rotation on MTV. They were so successful, the major labels and Rolling Stone magazine repackage all these new and young bands as "New Wave" which was more palatable to their arthritic sensibilities.

    Many established rock acts originally vowed never to participate with MTV format but changed course and jumped on the band wagon. ZZ Top had a make over - long beards and all, and made a spectacular comeback.

    Fast forward to the 1990's and Congress passing The Telecommunications Act which deregulated the ownership of Radio Broadcasters. This allowed big corporations to own and operate multiple radio stations in the market - outright monopolies in many markets.

    Major corporate interests like Clear Channel / iheartMedia bought out many radio stations across the US and took control away from local radio programmers of what was played in slews local markets.

    The effect of this take-over was that from now on, some anonymous corporate douche bag in NY would decide what would get played on your local radio. What they chose was bland music from yesteryear. What we got was Corporate Rock or what is now referred to as Classic Rock.

    Forget about any new and innovative band getting signed to a major label. Major labels reissued their back catalogues of their signed artists and only signed new bands that they thought would FIT THE CORPORATE MOLD of their new corporate overlords.
     
  17. tiktok

    tiktok Supporting Member

    Messages:
    20,269
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Location:
    Seattle
    The only thing stopping someone from making a great record today is their ideas and abilities. The technology is an enabler.

    Now, if your ideas are bad and your abilities are so-so, trouble can ensue. Because: technology is an enabler.
     
  18. skronker

    skronker 2010/2013/2015 S.C. Champions Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,134
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2008
    Location:
    Aloha from Oahu, Hawaii
    technology is never the culprit, it's the people using the technology that are responsible
    you can't "ruin" a genre
    you can't "kill" a genre (grunge "killing" rock,lol, people were looking for something different and "grunge" came along and was made the villain)
    the rise and fall of any genre is normal
    big band jazz use to be hot, what happened? it was good music played by good musicians, what happened? for whatever reason the public's taste changed with the times
     
  19. GulfportBound

    GulfportBound Member

    Messages:
    7,260
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2011
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    When rock decided dancers didn't matter but cartoon circus shows played at ear-slaughtering volume by the minds of five-year-olds did---and the chauvinism of reproducing records note-for-note, sound-for-sound during live performances---that's when rock stopped mattering. (And, no, headbanging is not dancing.)

    Just as happened to jazz when the musicians became more concerned with experiments and intellectualism than with the groove and the soul.

    No matter what genre, Ellington's Law prevails: it don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
  20. SynapticGroove

    SynapticGroove Member

    Messages:
    216
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    You guys must not remember Elvis, The King of Rock, or The Beatles, both of which existed long before MTV and both were molded to fit an image, hyper-marketed to teenagers and slave-driven by record executives and their respective handlers. Hell, even the Blues, which gave birth to Rock, has been highly commercialized since at the least the 1960's....and yes, I'm very much talking about the English bands we all love.

    One could easily argue that music hasn't been worth a **** in the last 50 years; Rock and Roll was stillborn and has always been dead...if we are talking about it in the context of record labels and commercialization. If it wasn't commercialized to some degree, you and I wouldn't know about it.

    Granted, I'll give you that it actually took some talent to play instruments back then, which is probably why you have more people familiar today with Fruity Loops sequencing than guitar leads. Also, technology has definitely made the barrier to entry much, much lower...which results in a lot more noise to sift through to find some gems.

    Bands/Music are packaged differently and some of them are completely self-packaged now, but human nature hasn't changed in the last half century, nor will it change much in the next 50 years.
     
    Abram4235, pedalparty, seward and 3 others like this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice