How computers ruined rock music

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by LP Freak, Apr 14, 2019 at 1:30 PM.

  1. Hallogallo

    Hallogallo Member

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    Maybe if everyone diverted their energy from complaining about music to making some music...…..
     
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  2. Hallogallo

    Hallogallo Member

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    Is it weird that your response came before my original post?
    Nevermind. Looks like I posted it 3 separate times.


    I agree with you.
    I'm just being a smart ass because I feel like I see more complaining about music on TGP, than people actually making music. But again, that's my mistake as I often mistake TGP for a musician's forum.


    It could be that money and the arts don't really mix that well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019 at 3:28 PM
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  3. Seymour Cash

    Seymour Cash Supporting Member

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    How can a person get a listen to your creation?
     
  4. kludge

    kludge The droid you're looking for Silver Supporting Member

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    I'll probably post it here soon. We just got the masters this weekend, and it's getting sent to manufacturing today. I imagine it'll be up on Bandcamp by friday.
     
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  5. BlueRiff

    BlueRiff Silver Supporting Member

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    I disagree. Since the birth of rock and the first inkling that money could be made by investors from millions of teenagers, it's been about selling the product. But like any business - you have innovators continually bringing new products (innovative artists and bands) and others who get really big then start the mass production of sure fire hits by doing it over and over again (mass producers) and get really efficient but take no risks (e.g. ZZ Top). Eventually they decline. No different than any other industry. I don't believe in the concept of pure raw rock music art falling prey to Madison Avenue- it's just another business and when business gets big - you scale up and get efficient to maximize profits and unless you innovate, you get stale and die.
     
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  6. Tubes99

    Tubes99 Member

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    Bill's my favourite man in the world.
    I understand what you mean by the War on Drugs, he's very "traditional" in his approach and sound, however it is those old styles being blended into modern day music/themes. There is an occasional drum machine here and there etc. I think he's a great guitarist though.

    I only mentioned Youth Lagoon and The XX because, I mean they are still driven by guitars and bass... yeah (maybe not Youth Lagoon anymore) but its definitely alternative.
     
  7. blackba

    blackba Member

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    Sure its a click bate title to the video, but I still liked the video. To me Quantization makes rock more like EDM. When I want Rock I want Rock with the human element. If I want EDM, I will go to that.
     
  8. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Really is.

    This is a strange situation. The content of this Youtube thingie is too esoteric for ordinary people, but seems too empty of "there" to satisfy the guys who actually do this stuff for a living.

    +

    It occurs to me that there's huge gulf, between people who just want a dance-able track and someone who is looking for the musical equivalent of something one finds on the wall at a high end art gallery. I think we can get folks to bop their head to just about anything. Just exactly how do you get the Music Consumer to crave "more"?
     
  9. Hallogallo

    Hallogallo Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  10. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    So, is Sheeran's discovery a good thing, or a bad one?

    Over democratization of music sourcing is not necessarily a good thing. We rant about "these big labels" but I think you actually need someone out there to act as a Filter to cull out massive percentages of possible music enjoying a heyday. Sure, some great bands get overlooked and passed over, but the idea was for someone "better" to custom select those musician/performers that were far more interesting than most, and then the general public is exposed to those and learns a common language with other people around their culture, around their state and nation. Democracy is great for choosing leaders and all that stuff, but IMO is serious imperfect as it has produced a gigantic sea of underdeveloped, "fast food" music that's too often generated through computer based devices. The organic music cannot get through - can't be heard over the din of all these so creative people - everyone has a recording these days.

    Maybe the very worst thing about music right now, is Missy Sue made the choice and she's cute and popular and the rest of the music gets drown out by her choices. Sometimes, democracy sucks.
     
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  11. Hallogallo

    Hallogallo Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  12. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    There was a place in the Quarter called the la Boucherie and a female friend and I would go there and dance for an hour, sit and talk and drink for a few minutes then back at it - btw each was dating someone else. Way into the early morning. It was a great time but for the love of all things, I couldn't tell you a darned detail as to what songs were being played. They had the right btm and that's what counted.

    It was great exercise and my blood pressure and heart rate were always better the next couple days.

    But I am not here at TGP to talk about those songs, or whatever we want to call them. I have absolutely no interest in this sort of music, or about as much interest as I have in the source of the glass of milk I had earlier.

    So, I don't care if you consider it "real" or not.
     
  13. Juneaumike

    Juneaumike Member

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    Nah, music is fine. In a lot of ways it's better than its ever been since you can make and record professional sounding music with a laptop and shareware. Add Youtube to the mix and we get exposure to way more music than we ever got from commercial radio and record stores. I enjoy bands that I shouldn't even know exist.

    Music is fine.
     
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  14. kludge

    kludge The droid you're looking for Silver Supporting Member

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    Most of the old men yelling at clouds here have their filter... they still just listen to the stuff they discovered in high school, and think it's the greatest music ever made and everything that came after is just crap because [computers / commercialism / spoiled kids / whatever other nonsense]. And note the defensiveness... it's not just that today's music isn't as good, it's that it can't be as good as the glories of the zenith of artistic civilization that was whatever was on the radio when they turned 17.

    The simple fact is, it's impossible to listen to all the great music ever made. It's impossible to listen to all the great music coming out today. So we find a genre, something we like, and we dig in. If you're young, you're probably looking through peer-group filters for new and exciting music that represents your own present and cultural context. And then you start repeat-listening the stuff that really turns you on, and you keep repeat-listening, and suddenly it's 40 years later and you're still listening to it, so there can't be anything good that happened after, or you'd be listening to that instead. And what little new music you do hear sounds bad, because it doesn't sound like the worn-out groove in your brain from listening to the same music for 40 years now.

    Now, if you're willing to get out of your comfort zone and seek out some new filters, you'll quickly find the "organic music" that "can't get through". Just go find a new filter. I have a friend in her mid-twenties (about my own kids' age) who plays lead guitar in a few local bands and leads one herself. Her thing is good old-fashioned loud rock'n'roll, informed by a love of punk, classic rock, and the riot-girl indie bands going back to when she was a baby. She has a guitar, an amp, a fuzz pedal, and an attitude. Nothing about her rig or her technique would be out of place 50 years ago. By going to her shows, I get to catch a whole bunch of amazing local bands, all kids like her, all rocking their hearts out with the guitar/bass/drums formula that worked so well for us.

    Skip sideways a bit. I'm always singing the praises of Tuareg "desert blues" music here. I think it's the best music scene in the world today. I count on the Sahel Sounds label to filter for me, and the outstanding work by a particular local venue to bring several Tuareg bands (and other African bands) every year. It's just a new filter. And another sideways skip, and I'm listening to a different genre on a podcast a friend of mine does, an hour or so of mostly new-to-me music every other week. I hear things that jump out and I buy them and listen. And then I go back and listen to Rush, because that was 17 year old me and I still dig it...

    There are lots of internet tastemakers out there who would love to introduce you to new music. You just need to be willing to seek them out. And in some ways, they're better than the old days, because they have little or no commercial interest, unlike the record labels and radio stations of old. They share because they love.

    Stop being lazy and waiting for someone else to chew your food for you.
     
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  15. Timcito

    Timcito Member

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    It's a limited genre, let's face it. There's only so much you can do with a bunch of basic chords, a strong beat and a rebellious attitude. For me, it reached a brief zenith in the early-to-mid 70s with Zep, Purple, Sabbath and the like, but by the late 70s it had already declined into soft rock affluence with such as the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac, simple guitar bashing and obnoxious behavior in punk and silly pantomime in the hair bands that would take up the early part of the next decade. Art forms have a shelf life. I do not think rock had the wherewithal to survive in any valid way for very long.
     
  16. MountainCraft

    MountainCraft Member

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    LMAO! Perfect! I have to remember that line... :aok
     
  17. uab9253

    uab9253 Member

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    The name of the game on YouTube is views and watch time. And, sadly, negativism sells. If I made a video called "10 Things I Love About the Gibson Guitar Company" it would get X views. If I made a video called "10 Things I HATE About the Gibson Guitar Company" it would get 1000X views. Also people like videos with numbers in them, or so the research says. "Five Inexpensive Ways to Improve Your Tone" - crap like that. If he made a video about all of the wonderful contributions that computers are making to recorded music, it would be crickets.

    I agree with some of his premises - quantizing is particularly overdone, but I do it. I do it because my drumming is so lousy. Now that I'm using more EZ Drummer loops in my songwriting/recording, I guess they are quantized by default but you can add some swing back in. Everything else I lay on top of the drums is not corrected though and as sloppy as my internal metronome. So I get some of the feel back that way. Too much feel, some may say.
    Lol

    But yes, if you make videos by first deciding what will give you the views, you end up making negative dreck just for the hits. And that's just people who are rewarding and encouraging the negativity and click bait content, rather than any YouTube AI.
     
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  18. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Silver Supporting Member

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    Though you're certainly entitled to however you see it, I think many are missing his point. And yes - other factors have served to exascerbate the decline, but from a more organic aspect I think he's spot-on.

    The perfection of all beats exactly on the measure, all pitches exactly on point, all of everything made as a machine would make it, effectively removes the one thing that separates music from sound, which is the human quality, otherwise known as humanity.

    Think about it - the brain is what's processing what the ears hear, and after 4-8 bars of perfect tempo and tone, the brain says "ok, nothing more to hear here" and it now becomes a form of ear fatigue as there's really nothing more to maintain your interest.

    It's all about the imperfections, and not "perfection".
     
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  19. DreamTheaterRules

    DreamTheaterRules Former Lyricist for Calhoun Tubbs Silver Supporting Member

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    Still (only 6 pages in) it seems like MOST are missing his point. Not that there is no rock and roll. But that the "feel, soul, vibe" has been taken away by grid locking and auto tuning. LOTS of posts aren't even relating to what he actually said. But what he DID say and gave visual evidence of, is hard to dispute. So, "killed rock and roll" didn't mean it was dead or there was none. It meant it sucked the soul and vibe out of it. And to a large degree, that's hard to dispute with "most" commercially available rock.
     
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  20. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Silver Supporting Member

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    Well, you made sense up until this, which if I understand you correctly means all the Brit Invasion, all Motown, all old Blues, Rockabilly, Soul, Funk...hell, I'll stop there...all this is just musical puberty?

    So out of curiosity, what do you suggest someone with an eye towards being a musical adult listen to?
     
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