How Do You Evaluate Your Tone?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Abandoned, Apr 2, 2015.

  1. Abandoned

    Abandoned Member

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    So obviously we each have our playing environments and different ways of evaluating our tones. How do YOU evaluate your tone? For instance...

    How far away do you place yourself when analyzing your tone (10ft, 15ft, 20ft, etc.)?

    Are you sitting down or standing up?

    Is it in a medium/larger venue or practice space? Or in a room in your home?
     
  2. soulsurfer

    soulsurfer Member

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    context is everything. I try to evaluate from the audience's perspective. If I'm the audience then it is relative to 'me'. stand up, sit down, front and center, or 20ft off center...me. If it is just us 'the band', then I adjust my tone to mesh with the audience...in this case the band....

    ...on up to where I would, at some point, have to trust someone else's 'ear' for the audience and then it goes back to me playing to me/band. (I'm part of the band too right?)
     
  3. SteveO

    SteveO Member

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    When I was still gigging, I used a wireless to wander around the room to get an idea of what everything sounded like. Since it was a two guitar band, it was more a matter of making sure that both of us sounded good together than anything else. This approach carries over into home recording as well (which is what I'm doing these days), it has to sound good in the mix.
     
  4. Braciola

    Braciola Silver Supporting Member

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    ......... Directly proportional to how big the smile is on my face.
     
  5. Leonc

    Leonc Wild Gear Hearder Gold Supporting Member

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    At home, I'll stand about 8 - 10 feet in front of the amp and listen to it. But the acid test is always on stage with the band. I'll try to get as far out in front of it as I can...which is general not much more than 5 or 6 feet and listen in the context of musical performance.
     
  6. la noise

    la noise Supporting Member

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    It changes all the time---both because of subjective
    reasons (mood and attitude, as well as stress levels make
    an impact on what we subjectively perceive--in my experience)
    and objective reasons (shape of the room, size of the stage, how
    far or close together the band is playing).

    A couple of foolproof ways I have discovered are

    1) record rehearsals and/or gigs. As the old saying goes,
    "Tape never lies." :)

    Also good for showing an over-the-top band member that
    they are a little too loud, too. If needed. ;)

    2) have someone play through my rig while I walk around and
    listen from various places in the room/venue.

    3) experience. If I have played a venue before I tend to have a
    general idea of what will work tonally and what will not. There are
    dark rooms that eat up sound and bright and splashy rooms with a
    lot of bounce.

    I try to play to the room rather than have a pre-conceived notion of
    what I want my tone to sound like and then impose it on the room.
    A really bouncy room with a lively sound might have me play without
    any inline reverb. One the other hand, a really dead room might have me
    playing with more reverb than I generally would.

    It all matters. :)
     
  7. guitarpedaladdict

    guitarpedaladdict Supporting Member

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    My wife... Sorry couldn't resist
     
  8. bloc

    bloc Member

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    Depends on what genre I'm playing tbh.

    But I think one of the universal tone characteristics for me is clarity. I'll strum a big E chord and then pick each note individually so the notes bleed into each other. I'll make sure each note is cascading into the next in a pleasing way and also make sure no note is stronger/weaker than the rest.
     
  9. Wagster

    Wagster Member

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    This!
     
  10. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Smart man.
     

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