How do you point your speaker cabs?

hector

Member
Messages
1,077
Wondering what is the most common (or practical) setup for a speaker cab on stage. I used to use a combo amp, and point the speaker up at me (like a monitor). However, we are now playing gigs without micing the amps, so setting it up for me as a monitor does not work. Let's assume it's a small room and you're not micing the amp through a PA. We know that standing directly in line with the speaker, the highs are prominent. I tried a Weber Beam Blocker once, but couldn't get the thing to stop rattling (mounting issues). Right now, I use a 2x12 vertical slant cabinet. So, the top speaker points slightly towards me, but since I'm close to the amp, it only probably hits me in the belly. Others have suggested a straight cab sitting on the floor, where the speakers are not pointing at your upper body at all. Now, you'll turn up the highs to hear them. However, anyone standing directly in front of you cab (like the crowd at a short distance) will likely hear piercing highs. Obviously, there's no perfect answer, since it depends where you are (player, audience) in the relation to the speaker axis, but was wondering what is most common.
 

GlueMan

Member
Messages
991
My preference is behind me, tilted up at about a 45 degree angle. Bought one of those 'tri-stands' for just that purpose.
 

hector

Member
Messages
1,077
I assume you're micing the amp in the PA? Otherwise, I doubt people out front will hear you. We are currently not micing amps, for small rooms.
 

GlueMan

Member
Messages
991
I assume you're micing the amp in the PA? Otherwise, I doubt people out front will hear you. We are currently not micing amps, for small rooms.
Oh...they hear me alright. :dude

Seriously, though, I've not had any problem being heard. I feel like pointing it up helps to fill out/fill up the room so the sound is less directional. Our band has some nice dynamics, also. We only mic for large rooms.
 

spence

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,675
My cabs (2x12 & 4x10) sit on the floor. I cut a couple pieces of 2x4, painted them black, and stick them under the front end of the cabs. I do this wherever I play and it works just fine (they're also portable and never break). My cabs are slant style cabs too, so that extra top angle comes into play if I HAVE to stand right in front of the amps.
 

GCDEF

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
28,247
I have a combo sitting on an extension cabinet pointing pretty much forward and right at me. It's loud enough to be pretty loud in my ears, but still needs PA support for the house. Why don't you mic your amp?
 

hector

Member
Messages
1,077
I have a combo sitting on an extension cabinet pointing pretty much forward and right at me. It's loud enough to be pretty loud in my ears, but still needs PA support for the house. Why don't you mic your amp?

We are working with a very minimal PA system. The decision was to use it for vocals and keys. Honestly, after vocals and keyboards, all of the mixer inputs are taken. It's all part of our attempt to keep and simple and mix our own system, w/o paying for a soundman. In some smaller clubs, this seems to work, for the most part. However, it's easy to bury the vocals when the amps get turned up.
 

hector

Member
Messages
1,077
Another factor is closed back or open back. The general consensus, closed back is focused, but has pronounced low end. Open back has less lows, but fills the room better. My 2x12 cab is semi-open.
 

smolder

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
14,455
In a small club or room I like to put a combo, 1x12 or 2x12 on a chair and away from the wall at least a foot or so. If it is a really small room, facing the cab AT the wall can be helpful. If there is sound support I like that the monitors are closed back and angled up so that I can walk into and out of the sound cone. My practice room is set up this same way.
 






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