How do you read a Strobostomp??

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by sproul09, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. sproul09

    sproul09 Member

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    I just recently picked up a Peterson Strobostomp and I am pretty happy with it except I can't figure out how to read it. Mine was used so it didn't come with a manual, but I downloaded one but it didn't have any info on actually how to read it. Like with the Boss or other tuners, it has the LED that go from side to side and when it hits the middle green LED then its in tune. But with this one it has that strobe stuff on the side but I have no idea how to read if its sharp or flat. Can anyone help me out with this???
     
  2. webs

    webs Supporting Member

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    If the blocks are cascading downwards, tune higher. Tune lower if they are moving upwards.
     
  3. markom89

    markom89 Senior Member

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    Like webs said, but I should also add that you wanna' get the blocks to be as steady as possible. If they're still you're in perfect tune.
     
  4. Eric Pykala

    Eric Pykala Member

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    Another trick for a newb is to just pay attention to the right-most part of the display. The others will just confuse you.-e.
     
  5. lapis

    lapis Member

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    Peterson says to pay attention to the leftmost bar as that is the fundamental, the other bars are the harmonics.

    For newbies it is easier if you

    1) Lightly pluck at the 12th fret

    2) Use the neck pup

    3) Roll back the tone some

    When you get the hang of it, it becomes easy & you can throw those guidlines out the window.
     
  6. paddywhack

    paddywhack Silver Supporting Member

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    ...i stare at the middle band and ignore the outer two....makes it easier for me
     
  7. 6789

    6789 Member

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    also pluck with your finger, not a pick.
     
  8. localmotion411

    localmotion411 Supporting Member

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    Also, don't pluck the string too hard. Pluck fairly lightly but enough to get a solid reading. Use neck pickup. Turn tone knob down some. I recommend volume knob all the way up.
     
  9. 205

    205 Senior Member

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    considering how expensive those things are this sounds like a lot of messing around just to tune a guitar.

    You can always get a TU-2...
     
  10. localmotion411

    localmotion411 Supporting Member

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    I used a TU-2 for years but switched when I started playing Suhrs with Buzz Feiten tuning. The Strobo is a must-have with BFTS. It is worth the extra tuning effort to get tuning as good as what I'm experiencing, and FWIW, it's not that much effort once you become accustomed to it.
     
  11. les_patlaw

    les_patlaw Member

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    ...and be out of tune.

    Kidding. I know you Tu-2 fans are hardcore and more power to you!
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2014
  12. eru

    eru Member

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    My understanding is that the BFTS changes string lengths (new saddles and nut)...can't figure out if it moves frets.

    Either way, why would you need a special tuner to use with it?

    I admit there may be a reason I haven't thought of, but for the life of me, I can't figure out why those tuners are popular as opposed to any good cent-accurate chromatic tuner that costs LOTS less... you can even tune harmonics, which is a habit I've picked up. I do it, but I haven't noticed a difference in my intonation as long as the guitar is set up well.

    Can someone explain it to me in a way that actually makes sense besides "it's better," or "it uses harmonics."
     
  13. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    just look at the whole display. if it's moving up, you're sharp, if it's moving down, you're flat. if it's just sort of shifting around in place, you're in tune. it will never stand still, because your string doesn't stand still.

    the reason these things (and others, like the sonic research turbo-tuner) are preferred is because they're way more accurate, and once you understand how they behave, way faster than a regular tuner.

    a regular chromatic tuner counts the cycles of the note, averages them, then displays what that average pitch is, by which time the string might have already drifted up or down. this is why the tuner display sort of lags behind you when you tune. once you're in the tuner's window of "ok, this is close enough", the "in-tune" light will come on. this window can be several cents wide, close enough for rock and roll, but that's about it.

    a strobe tuner doesn't count or average anything. the sound basically "creates" the display, and what the sound does, the display does, at the same time. turn a tuning key, and the display moves instantaneously. once you get used to this, you can tune right to the note, and when the display is still enough for your satisfaction, you're done. if you're in a hurry (in the middle of a song, for instance), yank that key until the display just moves a little, and you'll be as in-tune as a tu-2 can tell. if you have more time (in the studio, say) you can try to make the display stand as still as possible. the advantage is, now you can tell what the string is really doing, and to a degree that's actually more accurate than the human ear.
     
  14. usc96

    usc96 Member

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    Plus you can tune the strings to each other in the sweetened tuning mode.
     
  15. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    It's popular it is much more accurate. When I switched I could hear the difference significantly and immediately.
     
  16. localmotion411

    localmotion411 Supporting Member

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    Umm... what he said! :AOK
     
  17. KennethC

    KennethC Member

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    I really liked your post, thought it answered the Q v well.

    A Q arose in my head tho...

    If your above statement is really what's happening, then how would the human ear be able to discern the difference between one that's tuned by the Strobostomp and another by a TU-2, for instance?
     
  18. stonevibe

    stonevibe Member

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    What happened to tuning by ear?
     
  19. Laird_Williams

    Laird_Williams Member

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    Amen to that....and especially when using alternate tunings of any kind.

    Remember that a guitar is NEVER perfectly in tune, never perfectly intonated - no matter what your tuner says. And, even more importantly, sometimes a less perfect tuning is what you want. Our perception of frequency as pitch is also not the nearly-perfect mathematical relationship that is encoded in a tuner. You want a tuning that SOUNDS good - not necessarily one that looks good on a tuner. As your ear develops, the satisfaction you get from using a tuner is reduced (not eliminated though...I still think its an important tool.)

    When I am in a hurry, I may use the tuner to tune all 6 strings. But rarely. I find that tempered tunings sound better. Some alternate tunings require a LOT of tempering and even the best Strobe tuners do not really support this. Even when I use a tuner on all 6 strings, I end up tweaking by ear.

    Even in standard tuning, I generally only use a StroboStomp to tune strings 3 and perhaps 4, and then tune the others using harmonic relative tuning by ear (from inside to outside).
     
  20. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    One thing that doesn't get mentioned much, but especially important with a tuner as accurate as the strobostomp...

    you want to be picking the string lightly over and over while tuning, NOT letting it ring out. Strings when they ring out (i.e. you hit it once and let the note go through its attack, and decay while tuning) go sharp as they settle down. Unless you play a lot of hanging notes, you want to have it be tuned when the note is hit.
     

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