How do you smooth out a neck finished in tung oil?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by GuitarInnovations, Apr 15, 2015.

  1. GuitarInnovations

    GuitarInnovations Member

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    I guess tung oil is supposed to be pretty smooth, but this particular neck could definitely be smoother. It's an SG that had the neck stripped and redone in tung oil.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 15, 2015
  2. sharpshooter

    sharpshooter Member

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    It's called "tung" oil, and you would wet-sand the neck, using the oil
    and 800/1000/1200 paper.
     
  3. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Tongue Oil, eh?

    I think I better subscribe to this one. :^)
     
  4. GuitarInnovations

    GuitarInnovations Member

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    Does this process essentially fill in any grains with dust?

    Also, it sounds like these kinds of finishes don't benefit from buffing?
     
  5. halcyon

    halcyon Supporting Member

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    I simply don't buy guitars finished in tung oil -- neck or body. I really, really dislike the feel. ;-)

    EDIT: And no, they don't benefit from buffing. Tung oil isn't like a finish in that way.
     
  6. shane88

    shane88 Member

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  7. billywade

    billywade Member

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    Tru Oil also offers a wax. My main strat neck is tru oil finished and it played much better (much less sticky) after the first wax and buff.
     
  8. GuitarInnovations

    GuitarInnovations Member

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    I just did a search for Tru Oil Wax and couldn't find anything.
     
  9. Last

    Last Member

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    Tung Oil takes a very long time to cure out.

    Give it some time and use wet sanding starting with 800grit ending with 1500 to smooth it out once you can use the neck for more than a half hour before it gets sticky.

    If it's getting sticky after use, it's not dry enough.

    To answer a couple of questions posted so far;

    No, any sanding will not help with pore filling. Tung Oil will not buff out very well, but, you may like the results when tried.

    Good luck!
     
  10. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Raw Tung Oil doesn't have enough of the molecule chains that serve as "driers", so it might dry in the deserts of Northern Chile or on the driest week all year in Arizona, but it surely won't dry in Missouri. And in New Orleans, are you kidding?

    IMO it must be cooked or polymers have to be added to make it workable. Sometimes adding enough Stoddard Solvent is enough in some environments, but not often enough in NOLA.

    I like Minwax Tung Oil Finish but I'm not sure how much, if any, Tung Oil that product even has. I like something I can wipe on, wait 5 minutes, then wipe the residue off, then repeat. Great over an oil based toned grain filler to seal in the pop and tone and smoothness the grain filler brings.

    I had a 48 oz. bottle of Finished Tung Oil that wasn't cheap, and I tried to devise some guitar finishing uses for it, but none were satisfactory for Louisiana. But eventually I added it here and there to the Exterior oil based Deck Finish I was using on The Cabin, and it really improved the performance of those cans of finish.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2015
  11. poolshark

    poolshark Supporting Member

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    First off, need pics. Next, it depends if the 'tung oil' is actually tung oil or a mixture of boiled linseed oil. Most over the counter oils are the latter and, IMO, better of the two. Either way, I've always had the best luck giving it a light buff with a scotch brite pad, just enough to knock off the gloss. No reason to wet sand, IMO.
     
  12. GuitarInnovations

    GuitarInnovations Member

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    I have no idea what exactly was used, but the previous owner said it was done in tung oil. Here are some pics:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. SPROING!

    SPROING! Member

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    It will never be flat and smooth like gloss lacquer. The film left behind is so thin it's barely there at all.
     
  14. kmcmichael

    kmcmichael Member

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    I have used real tung oil but live in a dry climate. I now use boiled linseed oil because of the way it looks on maple. You could seal it with shellac and get it lacquered.
     

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