How do you wind your strings when re-stringing?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by JDavisNJ, Oct 21, 2008.

  1. JDavisNJ

    JDavisNJ Member

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    I've played for over 10 years, but have never got around to understanding the "proper" way to wind strings. If I'm changing strings on a strat, for example, I'll feed the string through the peghole to the left of the headstock. I'll then bring it underneath the string 1 or 2 times, as tight as I can. Then I begin to wind.

    Is there a "proper" way to do this? Should I be wrapping around the peghead at all?

    Thanks

    -Joe
     
  2. SgtThump

    SgtThump Member

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    Heck, I don't know either. I do one wrap over the top of the string I stuck through the tuner, then another wrap or two below it. That works very well for me, but I wouldn't say it's "proper" or anything.
     
  3. telemike

    telemike Member

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    I do the over/under wrap on the wound strings and the tie method on the unwound strings. I've tried to tie the wound strings but they just don't seem to work as well.
     
  4. JDavisNJ

    JDavisNJ Member

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    Thanks for the replies fellas.

    What do you mean exactly by the "tie" method?

    thanks

    -Joe
     
  5. bluesjunior

    bluesjunior Member

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    On the E_A_D strings I go round the string post one and a half times and then through the hole I then pull the string hand tight and give it a sharp 90 degree twist where the excess comes out of the hole to lock it. I find that this then gives me approx three turns when the guitar is tuned. I do the same on the G_B_E strings except I give them two and a half turns round the post. Once I tune the guitar I stretch the strings until they remain in tune and i'm good to go and my guitar stays in tune.
     
  6. thetourist

    thetourist Member

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    I put the string through the hole in the tuner and pull without force so far that it is straight, then bring it back little less than 2'' and start winding. Be careful that each wind is below the previous one.
     
  7. guitarmook

    guitarmook Member

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    I do a version of this, except the first wrap goes 'under', then the remaining wraps go 'over'...
     
  8. klaetos

    klaetos Member

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    For my electric...Sperzel locking tuners absolutely love them no winding needed. For my acoustic and when stringing others I use this method from Taylor Guitars. This was really helpful for me to learn how to string my Taylor, it was always a huge pain in the butt for me to change strings until I started using this method, I also use a string winder to speed things up.

    http://www.taylorguitars.com/global/pdfs/Steel_Restring.pdf
     
  9. SgtThump

    SgtThump Member

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    I would think it would be better to go under, so there's more pressure on the nut. The same type of thing as a string tree.
     
  10. XKnight

    XKnight Member

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    I use Dan Erlewine's book for guidance.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

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  12. AndrewC

    AndrewC Supporting Member

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    Locking tuners. You'll never look back. :)
     
  13. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    Big fan of the back tie method, with a single wrap or a wrap and a half max. I like light strings, so I can back tie everything.

    On my Bigsby equipped Les Paul, I put Boomer 11's on there last week and back tied all six.

    For those inquireing about tying, I put the string through the hole, with about 1" deflection slack on the fingerboard. The bitter end coming out the tuner hole goes backwards around the post opposite the direction the tuned length is about to go. Then you tuck it under the string length that's headed toward the nut, remove all slack in that short semicircle, and bend it back over top of the string in a tight hairpin return. Then as the string comes to tension, it locks the string really positively. I find that a freshly strung guitar gets stable for me very promptly when using this method. Almost as good as locking tuners.
     
  14. John Coloccia

    John Coloccia Cold Supporting Member

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    I stick the string in the hole and turn the little knob. Anything more complex than that is too much work.

    I definitely don't like overlapping strings at all, though. Steel strings don't really stretch as far as I know. Going in and out of tune at the winding post is about slipping and settling (i.e. compressing strings underneath). It seems to me that the best tuning stability can be had if it's direct string to post contact. This minimizes the friction (easier to take up all the slack) and eliminates any slow, compression effects on the wound strings.
     
  15. Julia343

    Julia343 Member

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    Simple over and under on all 6. Never have tuning problems.
     
  16. FlyingDutchman

    FlyingDutchman Member

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    same here...
     
  17. leofenderbender

    leofenderbender Member

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    For a *strat* I purposely leave the D & G strings long and wrap the post so that the strings end up at the very bottom of the post. It takes longer -but- definitely improves the angle of the string over the nut.
     
  18. Mercury25

    Mercury25 Member

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    I'm addicted to locking tuners! :AOK
     
  19. edgewound

    edgewound Gold Supporting Member

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    +1;)
    ....this is also the fastest way to change a broken string during a song mid-gig.
     
  20. stevel

    stevel Member

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    Some advice:

    1. Hold the string taut as you wind so that the windings around the post are tight - otherwise they'll "take up the slack" later and slip when you bend and so on.

    2. Once you've got the string on, wrapped around the post a couple of turns, and rough-tuned, pull the string up, away from the fingerboard to stretch it. Make sure it comes out of the nut - here's why - as you wind it, the amount of tension on the headstock side is different from that on the fretboard side - especially if you've got a steep angle (downward with a string tree or down winds, or sideways like with a 3+3 headstock). This lets you equalize the tension on both sides of the nut so the string doesn't try to equalize itself later (which it will) when you bend or use the tremolo.

    3. My locking tuners say not to even have a complete wrap around the post! The logic is that, if you use the tremolo, the winds around the post will slacken up, and when you release the bar, the winds might not tighten to the same place they were before. This will make the string stick sharp.

    Nonetheless, I don't trust them, and I wrap them at least 1 turn on the the wound strings, and at least 2 or more on the plains (the B string slips a lot even with the locking tuner).

    4. Winding strings down (running under string trees, etc.) produces downbearing, which is important for creating a speaking length of the string that vibrates "true". However, too much downbearing also cause the string (especially the wounds) to stick when using the tremolo.

    5. Some cats like Van Halen used to wind so that the strings had very little downbearing across the nut - they literally wound the strings over on the posts. But this is for heavy tremolo use. And it doesn't prevent the winds from coming loose and not returning to zero when the tremolo is released. In fact, I'm beginning to think that it would be most efficient if the string never moved through the nut at all during tremolo use (so real heavy downbearing). My strat with the locking tremolo (and nut) NEVER went out of tune. I mean, seriously, never. I could leave it in the trunk all week, take it out, and it would be in perfect tune. Only problem was after a while, the bridge itself started to stick (I think the bridge posts got flat wear spots in them).

    HTH,
    Steve
     

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