How does one transform to become a legitimate blues player??

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Mayflower, Aug 23, 2019.

  1. vanderkalin

    vanderkalin Member

    Messages:
    2,125
    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    Location:
    Kimberley BC
    I
    was gonna like the previous post with the same opinion, but then he went on to spout some absolute rubbish about DT.
     
  2. SILA

    SILA Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2019
    A friend of mine once said...

    „If you don‘t get something, you just don‘t get it.“

    I clearly don’t get this whole play authentic and “either you got it or you ain’t” thing! And I’m happy I don’t when I look at some of the miserable comments and faces that hold this sort of thinking dear to them.

    Whatever happened to play what you enjoy and enjoy what you play?
     
    amstrtatnut and mycroftxxx like this.
  3. NotTheArrow

    NotTheArrow Member

    Messages:
    744
    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Location:
    Arizona
    In 2019, you don’t.

    There are no new legit blues artists. Sorry, game over.
     
  4. Miroslav L

    Miroslav L Member

    Messages:
    1,199
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Location:
    Southern NY
    Get a buddy to loosen the lug nuts on your car when you won't expect it.
     
  5. davidespinosa

    davidespinosa Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,073
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    Great players from non-traditional backgrounds:
    * Eric Clapton
    * Duane Allman
    * Ronnie Earl

    For me, blues guitar is about phrasing — telling a story with the guitar. The flashy, aggressive players don’t interest me at all. And that includes SRV !

    The great players sound like themselves, even though they’re playing the same five notes as anyone else. :)

    Some ramblings, not super coherent:

    In Clapton’s 13-minute version of Steppin’ Out, he doesn’t have enough to say all on his own, but he never plays nonsense.

    IMO, the last truly great player was 90’s-era Ronnie Earl. Check YT or the album Live in Europe.

    Or check Larry Carlton playing the B.P. Blues from Last Nite. Is he a blues player ? Nope. But it’s the most flawless two minutes of blues guitar I’ve ever heard.

    If you can hear the player thinking, it’s game over. Robben would get run over crossing the street in China. But Ronnie Earl would part the traffic like Moses.

    B.B.’s tone was like nothing else, to the very end. The recordings don’t do it justice. But after about 1985, he was phoning in his performances, repeating the same licks, with very little invention.

    I have a theory about Albert King. The licks repeat, but the way he places them against the beat changes constantly. I’d call it “micro timing”. He was a drummer before taking up guitar.
     
    SILA likes this.
  6. Vic Interceptor

    Vic Interceptor Member

    Messages:
    2,598
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Blues is the martial arts of music. A lot of people can chop and kick, but there are very few "masters".

    Josh Smith is a phenomenal talent. He knows SO much guitar. He reminds me of Danny Gatton, and that's not a compliment in my book. He should focus on being the next Larry Carlton or fusion/jazz player. Every time I hear him, like Gatton, he seems to want to play every lick, scale and note on the guitar... he just screams "LOOK AT ME!! I SHOULD BE A STAR!" with his playing. If he ever stops thinking and just starts playing.... look out! He really should be a star in a world where Joe B is top gun. He is lightyears beyond Joe, maybe only Marcus King rivals Josh for guitar wizardry in the young sector, and honestly, Marcus is no match for Josh. I can't think of anyone except Mark Lettieri who could tangle with him in a long jam over jazz blues. (this is all modern guys, I'm talking about here)

    And with that said - they ALL need to take lessons from Jack Pearson when it comes to a true guitar master who knows when and how to lay back or hit the afterburner. For my money, he's the best overall guitarist alive today.

    Peter Green had a touch, dynamics and a gift for phrasing. Kirwan did too but not as deep. I agree 100% PG was the best guitarist of the 1966-1970 era regardless of continent or color. I hope whoever dosed him suffers greatly for what they robbed the world of.
     
    drlucky and Laurence like this.
  7. davidespinosa

    davidespinosa Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,073
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    So who is the most recent truly great blues player ?
     
  8. JohnnyBGoode

    JohnnyBGoode Member

    Messages:
    707
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    People were debating about what is real Blues in the 1960s.... What's new? Why should you care?
     
  9. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,282
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    I don't know of anyone who's shifted from being successful in one genre to the blues, for better pay, or gigs, because most everything else pays better and seems to be appreciated more widely.

    Don't worry about how to be "perceived" as "legit". Let your playing tell the listener. Like any genre, you'll need to study the roots, dig deep, woodshed styles you'll probably not use, learn songs nobody else will know, and study the similarities and differences between the "greats" of the past. A genuine appreciation and knowledge of the history, and a handle on the subtleties of the style is what you'll need. You don't have to be a string "dazzler", plenty of great blues was done by not-too-proficient players. How many players at a jam or playing professionally in your area could, on request, pull off a Lightnin' Hopkins tune?
    If you've done the homework and have a true appreciation for the genre, it'll show, even if you're not playing a particularly old song, or identifiable vintage style.

    How do you "need" to look? Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.

    Yep. I can tell pretty quickly listening to a player, and particularly, drummers, if they have listened, or studied the style(s).
    How many different ways are there to play a mid-tempo shuffle? Rock and variety players have one, maybe two. They'll play it all night long, because it's all they have in their toolkit. I once made a disc for a drum instructor with a full 80 minutes of shuffles, all different.
    If you want to be the next Stevie Ray, Clapton, Bramhall, or whatever, don't listen to them, listen to what they listened to. Learn what they learned.

    Uh huh....
    I'll preface by saying that the blues genre seems to move slower than others. There are artists considered to be on top of their game, who put out their last disc years ago. Also, are these players who just popped onto the scene, or players who have been putting in the dues for decades and are clearly all time greats?
    Do they have to be currently playing "blues"?

    Here's a list. @NotTheArrow can look 'em up if curious.

    Nick Curran
    Laura Chavez
    Kid Andersen
    Sean Costello
    Kid Ramos
    Junior Watson
    Kirk Fletcher
    Mike Henderson
    Doug Deming
    Shawn Pittman
    Gordie Johnson
    Rick Holmstrom
    DBII
    Matt Hill
    Johnny Main
     
    drlucky likes this.
  10. sidekick

    sidekick Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,499
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Location:
    My home
    On a more humorous note regarding one of the 'keys' to playing the blues, I liked 'The Simpsons' episode when Bleedings Gums Murphy at around 2.29 says to the low spirited Lisa after their jam on the bridge: "The blues isn't about making yourself feeling better, it's about making other people feel worse."

     
    Tonekat and MkIII Renegade like this.
  11. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,282
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    Just to put a cap on the sentiment that it doesn't matter where you came from, if you love the blues and study the history, it'll show.







    It doesn't matter what genre, either. Love it, learn it, play it.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYRRzcZcq_M
     
  12. JohnnyBGoode

    JohnnyBGoode Member

    Messages:
    707
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    That's very true. The Blues is really not about pentatonics. It's about the lyrics, history, mood... If one studies these he can play the Blues in almost any musical context. Otherwise - all the 12 bar shuffle in the world won't make it work.
     
  13. tapeworm

    tapeworm Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,803
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2010
    Location:
    Clutch City
    Kid Andersen or Nick Moss, depending on what we define as “recent”. Tons of guys from the generation just before him such as some but not all of those mentioned a few posts above.
     
  14. BBQLS1

    BBQLS1 Member

    Messages:
    3,279
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Red Stick, LA
    RL Burnside was pretty legit. But he is gone.
     
    makeitstop likes this.
  15. Jon C

    Jon C Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    16,591
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2002
    Location:
    Mid Atlantic USA
    A dear friend of mine is one of the greatest guitarists and musicians I’ve ever seen. He doesn’t have an authentic blues feel. He can play it and sound good but it’s not the real thing.

    You must learn (will?) where you fit on that spectrum.
     
    AZJim likes this.
  16. Jon C

    Jon C Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    16,591
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2002
    Location:
    Mid Atlantic USA

    You forgot Mike Bloomfield .... Howlin’ Wolf-sanctioned and approved. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
  17. BBQLS1

    BBQLS1 Member

    Messages:
    3,279
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Red Stick, LA
    Blues is just a style of music. Musicians learn to play styles of music. The more attention they pay to the nuances of that style, the better they become in that style. We all start at the bottom and work our way up.

    Aside from the joke comments in this thread, the whole idea that you can't play blues because you haven't suffered is just ridiculous. Just go play, even a rich man who was given everything can be a tortured soul. Even if you aren't tortured, you can still feel and express your feelings. Just go play your damned instrument.
     
  18. homerayvaughan

    homerayvaughan Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,540
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Location:
    Maine
    First off, in 2019, what defines a "legit" blues player?
    On the world wide stage, I know there are polarizing figures, like Bonamassa. Is he legit? Some say yes others, no. You can go on and on, players like Schofield, Josh Smith, Kirk Fletcher, Sayce, who are among my favorites...are they "legit"? To me, I don't know and don't care, but I like them, so...
    On a local level, good luck. The scene in Maine is weird. Pockets of "clicks" will call out people for not playing "real" blues...blues nazis...again, what's legit to them is not necessarily what I like, or feel is good music. Play what you feel, what you like, labels be damned...
     
    El Rey likes this.
  19. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Member

    Messages:
    41,317
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Location:
    East of the Rockies...
    Heck, I LOVE that song, and what a monster solo!
     
  20. Whittlez

    Whittlez Member

    Messages:
    2,187
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    Location:
    Seattlr
    I don’t think this idea is just dumb I also think it’s elitist, cliquish, and absurd

    The blues is not some exclusive club that you have to pass a purity test to get into

    I am sure there are people in other various genres of music such as metal, jazz, etc that might make similar ridiculous comments about inauthenticity if you don’t pass some kind of purity test or you haven’t paid your dues for X many years but it’s just a bunch of nonsense

    This is music. It’s an art form.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice