How flat should top of guitar be below the bridge?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by Cubicle, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. Cubicle

    Cubicle Member

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    Swedesboro, NJ
    How flat should the top of a new acoustic guitar be just below the bridge? Meaning, if I lay a straight-edge across the guitar from one side to the other, just below the bridge, and from that point to the bottom edge of the guitar, how flat should it be when new?

    I picked up a Martin D-16GT last night, and if I lay a 12" straight-edge across the guitar as described, there is a gap on either side of the straight-edge. I can rock the SE from side to side and near the bridge, there's almost 1/4" of room under the SE when rocked to one side.

    The top doesn't appear completely flat till you get as close as 2" from the bottom edge.

    Help, should I take it back?
     
  2. Cubicle

    Cubicle Member

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    Location:
    Swedesboro, NJ
    Never mind, found my answer...Should be slightly convex....Flat or Concave indicates a problem with lack of humidity.
     
  3. DeaconBlues

    DeaconBlues Member

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    way down below the ocean...
    I'm glad you posted this.
    What is the optimum amount of rise in the convex shape? I know a higher vs. lower string tension can cause the area behind the bridge to pull up more, but is there a guide line for this? How much is too much?
     
  4. Cubicle

    Cubicle Member

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  5. in a little row

    in a little row Member

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    Memphis, crime capital of the South
    it will vary by builder...but excessive bellying is a whole different story, implying a structural problem
     

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