• The Gear Page Apparel & Merch Shop is Open!

    Based on member demand, The Gear Page is pleased to announce that our Apparel Merch Shop is now open. The shop’s link is in the blue Navigation bar (on the right side), “Shop,” with t-shirts, hats, neck buffs, and stickers to start. Here’s the direct link: www.thegearpageshop.com

    You’ll find exclusive high-quality apparel and merchandise; all items are ethical, sustainably produced, and we will be continuously sourcing and adding new choices. 

    We can ship internationally. All shipping is at cost.


How hard is soldering?

bgriffin

Member
Messages
51
I've never soldered before, and am tired of spending money on pickup changes at a guitar tech. How hard is it to change out pickups? Specifically on a fender nashville tele!

thanks in advance guys.

B
 

markj

Member
Messages
47
It's not very difficult at all if you have a somewhat steady hand. You can probably find some decent "how to" examples on youtube. If you can follow a wiring diagram then hooking up the pups is very simple.

I hadn't done much of this until recently and now I've modded a couple of pedals and have an amp project in the wings. Once you get the hang of it, it's actually a bit of fun as well as satisfying.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=&search_query=soldering+tutorial&aq=0&oq=soldering+
 

skronker

2010/2013/2015 S.C. Champions
Messages
5,398
I've never soldered before, and am tired of spending money on pickup changes at a guitar tech. How hard is it to change out pickups? Specifically on a fender nashville tele!

thanks in advance guys.

B
soldering is easy, but you should practice before you do your first soldering job http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X87Vt38ceSg&feature=related

just google soldering and there are a bunch of video demonstrations available...
 

GAD

Wubbalubbadubdub
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
14,682
One of the toughest things to get right is soldering to a pot, which is often where pickups connect. Problem is heat dissapation, and the pots take a lot of energy to heat.

I recommend making some small kits before you attack the guitar.

GAD
 

Pat Healy

Senior Member
Messages
10,952
Get some clamps, alligator clips, or something to hold your work piece in place while you solder. Otherwise you'll be wishing you had three hands.
 
Messages
855
I just recently learned myself. One of those helping hand tools is essential imo, especially when you're soldering multiple wires into one location like the backs of pots. I practiced one a bunch of el cheapo pots till i had the confidence to tackle my first pickups/electronics install. Oh, and make sure you clean the tip often and tin the tip, area to be soldered, and the wires or whatnot that'll be going to it. Hope that helps :AOK
 

rick13

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
770
Get the right wattage iron for the right job. I use a big mother 100/140 watt gun to solder to pots, and a pencil tip soldering station set to 600 + degrees to do fine work.
It's really easy once you get the practice.
Rick
 

john b

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,050
I just did my first "big job" on a guitar - pots, wires, cap, pickups. I had done some soldering before and it always turned out badly. I went on youtube and searched "guitar soldering". There is some really useful stuff there and very helpful. When I did the job I felt pretty confident, had all the necessary stuff and, it was a blast!!!

I say go for it, just practice a little first to get the hang of it. I had used a 25w iron in the past and it wasn't hot enough. A 40w did the job no problem.

BTW - I'm just about to add a middle pup to my tele, turning it into a "nashville" tele. I've got it down pretty good if you have any questions.
 

JLee

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,742
One of the toughest things to get right is soldering to a pot, which is often where pickups connect. Problem is heat dissapation, and the pots take a lot of energy to heat.

I recommend making some small kits before you attack the guitar.

GAD
Use a large chisel tip for soldering to the back of pots. A 40 watt iron, a chisel tip and a finer tip for wires and lugs is all you need. Just watch out for surrounding wires and caps. I've burned/melted more than I care to mention.:puh
 

RL in Fla

Member
Messages
3,197
+1 on " Bigger iron " for pot bodies , get a "3rd Hand" gizmo , and I change out one of the gator clips on it for one like this : (Mueller 48b)





or a "modded" plain old clothespin . Gator for wire , Big'un for potshafts .... ;)
 

SnidelyWhiplash

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,280
I got all the info i needed from Stewmac's website. A month & a half ago,
i bought a soldering iron. Took my time & everything went as planned. If
a moron like myself can figure it out,anyone can.
 

Kingbeegtrs

Senior Member
Messages
1,926
if you do enough soldering you'll get so good at it that you'll brag to your friends about how well you can solder....and they'll look at you like you're absoulutely crazy.
 
Messages
23,951
Terry Downs over at TDPRI has an instructional video which is superb.

He's recovering from a serious car crash but I think he's able to fill orders at this point.
 

bgriffin

Member
Messages
51
Terry Downs over at TDPRI has an instructional video which is superb.

He's recovering from a serious car crash but I think he's able to fill orders at this point.
Someone recommended that DVD earlier in this thread, and i pulled the trigger and bought it! I'm not doing any soldering until I watch that whole thing!
 

Eagle1

Senior Member
Messages
8,655
A 25 Watt iron is big enough for all but Gibson pickup covers and strat spring claws. If you go with a 40 be careful not to overheat stuff and destroy it .
DPDT switches and small stuff will melt.
 




Trending Topics

Top