How important is structured practicing?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by boltzmann, Mar 28, 2020.

  1. The bear

    The bear Member

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    Ok, I will get to work.
     
  2. JosephZdyrski

    JosephZdyrski Member

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    I think there are various opinions what is VS what is not structured learning.

    I sometimes don’t know where to draw the line myself.

    I don’t think unstructured necessarily equals mindless noodling.

    I definitely do some structured practice, I study songs, scales/ chords relationships. Other people’s lines, etc.

    But when I’m learning say a jazz head or something else complex note for note, I rarely learn those things in a structured way, it’s usually out of sheer force of will because I love the song, or just out of pure obsession to be honest.

    Playing the same exact thing over and over for 7, 8, 10+ hours a day, until your hands are sore... nothing structured about that in my opinion.
     
  3. Ed DeGenaro

    Ed DeGenaro Supporting Member

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    You're a riot...lol
     
  4. Jamie_Mitchell

    Jamie_Mitchell Member

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    whatever it is you're doing seems to be working quite, quite well ;)
     
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  5. The bear

    The bear Member

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    Sometimes one needs to sound bad in order to sound good. Working on something that's not together yet might not be pretty, nevertheless it's important to keep at it.
     
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  6. Duffy Pratt

    Duffy Pratt Member

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    Before you pick up the guitar, or once a week, set a realistic goal of what you want to achieve in that practice session, and then do it. If you keep that up consistently, and set realistic goals for yourself, you will continue to improve. What those goals are is up to you. If you have no idea how to set realistic goals for yourself, or how to evaluate whether you've met them, then you could probably use a teacher/mentor.
     
  7. neonknight

    neonknight Member

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    This is excellent advice.
     
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  8. darkwaters

    darkwaters Member

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    Allow yourself time for unstructured non-practice time as well...

    We're all kids at heart and we need play time too. I find that it's during that play time that things I've learned come out in spontaneous and novel ways.
     
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  9. The bear

    The bear Member

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    Yes, sometimes messing around with the instruments, trying out new things, searching for sounds for new sounds is important. If every note you play is part of some super structured and calculated practice it wouldn't be very creative.
     
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  10. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    I feel like you and I have had this discussion in carbon-based reality at some point or another...

    I've always let the repertoire guide me, and when that lead to a technique I needed to learn, or sharpen, I addressed that technique. When I wanted to work on "Recuerdos" I developed a daily routine for working on my RH tremolo. When I wanted to learn the basics of playing over chord changes I took the tunes I was learning and practiced playing as melodically as I could with chord tones. Etc. But there was a body of repertoire always leading the way.

    One funny thing I've noticed about myself over the decades is that the strictness of my practicing is generally a counter-balance of my professional life. The more regimented my professional life, the more open and creative my practice tends to be, the more unstructured my professional life, the more disciplined my practice is.
     

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