How long until you "give up" on a new guitar?

supergenius365

Disclaimer: Not an actual supergenius
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I am the King of Instant Gratification.

If something doesn't impress me in the first 5 minutes, I get rid of it.
My wife. My car. My Boogie IIC+. My Barber Tone Press. All of these hooked me from the beginning.

Having said that, I am fiercely loyal to the stuff that does impress me.

What I am not good at is giving something a try out or experimenting time to get familiar with it, which has probably caused me to lose some quality stuff.

How long do you play a new guitar before deciding to keep it or move it?
 

Smakutus

Member
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8,367
Even if the guitar needs new strings and a set up I seem to know it's a good one, or it's not a good one right away. I've had guitars that I really wanted to like (colour, shape etc ..) that I have put money into to try and get them to be "great" and it never works.

With an amp or effects where you need to tweak controls it takes longer but not much..

Jeff
 

smallbutmighty

I do my own stunts.
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11,482
I give things a LOT longer than you....10 minutes. :RoCkIn

All of my keeper gear rattled my sockets right away. That's not to say I don't spend a good deal of time dialing it in. Usually it takes a good year for me to get to know a guitar, and get it tweaked just the way I like it, but there has to be something that grabs me about it the first time I pick it up, or I move on.

A
 

shallbe

Deputy Plankspanker
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12,951
Honestly, I won't buy it if I don't think it is a good guitar. If it is a custom-build, I truly expect it to be a good guitar before it arrives.

When I get a new one, I set it up FOR ME, my style and my amp. No one else can really do that. After playing it a whille, I will still make tweaks to action and pickup height, etc., until it feels just right.

I give a guitar a couple hundred hours before I bail on it. Then again, I don't buy a lot of guitars, and really enjoy the playing/tweaking/learning/bonding process with a new instrument.
 

Dave Orban

Platinum Supporting Member
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16,881
These days, I have a pretty good idea of what I'm looking for in a guitar, so I can typically get at least "in the ballpark," when it comes to choosing an instrument... That said, it generally takes me at least a couple of actual gigs, to really know whether it's a "keeper" or not...
 

dave s

Member
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6,440
One gig. It either works well for me, or it doesn't. The 'doesn'ts' don't stay around long at all.

Could be why all my amps and guitars are similar. I seem to gravitate toward what I know works well in a live situation.

dave
 

Jahn

Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver
Silver Supporting Member
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29,240
A guitar never comes home with me if I don't even get one single twinge from it. Too many other fish in the sea to have to "develop" one along.
 

supergenius365

Disclaimer: Not an actual supergenius
Silver Supporting Member
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12,140
Here's the culprit for me right now:

1996 Hamer Studio Custom - Absolutely mint condition.

100_2606.jpg


I love the look.
I love it is USA made - near my house in Illinois to boot.
I love that it is high quality hand made.
I love that it has humbuckers.
I love that my tech/repair/luthier called it "structurally perfect".

It just doesn't feel like my best friend.
 

Scotty J

Member
Messages
63
I bought this acoustic because I love the way it looks and feels, the only down side is, it was a bit difficult to play. The strings just felt like they were too tight. I figured I would just get used to it. After a year and a half of playing it, I decided that I still absolutely loved the guitar, but absolutely hated to play it.

I took it to my Luthier to see what he could do with it. A week and $45.00 later, the thing plays like a dream. I'm not exactly sure what he did, but it was some luthier magic.

1_Gibson.jpg
 

rockinlespaul

Member
Messages
3,854
These days, I have a pretty good idea of what I'm looking for in a guitar, so I can typically get at least "in the ballpark," when it comes to choosing an instrument... That said, it generally takes me at least a couple of actual gigs, to really know whether it's a "keeper" or not...

Yup...
 

gerryguitar

Member
Messages
830
it takes time I think to get used to something, how many times have you sold something only to discover you shouldn't have..?? I take my time before I buy something( unless it's just fantastic straight away ) and I take time afterwards to get to know what it can do... as a result not much that I buy is sold on again...
 

Structo

Member
Messages
9,553
A long time for me too.
I have to like it after spending the bucks, I just have to!
Then to try to unload it usually at a loss keeps it in a case.....
 

jazzandmetal?

Silver Supporting Member
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8,754
I give things a LOT longer than you....10 minutes. :RoCkIn

All of my keeper gear rattled my sockets right away. That's not to say I don't spend a good deal of time dialing it in. Usually it takes a good year for me to get to know a guitar, and get it tweaked just the way I like it, but there has to be something that grabs me about it the first time I pick it up, or I move on.

A

+1 10 Minutes.
 

fullerplast

Senior Member
Messages
6,781
Rejects go quickly. Definate keepers are are also easily identified.

The ones that are the "stragglers" are the guitars that sound great acoustically, have the perfect neck, and play great....but may not have the right pickups to really make it come alive. If it's that close, then I'll want to try a few things. Sometimes the difference between good and great is only one or two minor changes.

Same thing with amps.....a different speaker, tubes, or bias may transform a "fence sitter" amp.
 

mad dog

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,207
A couple minutes, a couple days, weeks, months. It depends on the instrument. Nothing comes home with me if the feeling isn't there. But that does not guarantee keeper status per se. I get to know over time whether the sound and feel can continue to inspire me (real important), then see if it can work for me live. Some very good ones -- keepers at another time in my life -- got sold lately. It's the price of experimentation.
 

Randaddy

Member
Messages
1,144
I've never bought a guitar that I didn't love in the first moments of playing it. And the only reason I would sell it later is that I'd found a guitar that I loved more! If it isn't magical from the beginning, it doesn't come home with me.
Having said that, I do set it up and tweek it perfectly for my playing, and that makes a noticable difference.
 




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