How many screws should a bolt-on neck attachment use?

How many screws should a bolt-on neck attachment use?

  • 1

    Votes: 4 6.3%
  • 2

    Votes: 8 12.5%
  • 3

    Votes: 9 14.1%
  • 4

    Votes: 52 81.3%
  • 5

    Votes: 4 6.3%
  • 6

    Votes: 3 4.7%
  • 7+

    Votes: 4 6.3%

  • Total voters
    64
M

Member 995

I’ve seen everything from two to six. Maybe there are guitars with one or more than six. Three had a bad rap, but I’ve had guitars that had no issues.

Let’s let the poll sort it out! Note: you can pick multiple options.
 

Benz2112

Memba?
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,920
Whatever works for the design. I always thought 3 bolt necks were junk by default, and now i have one and love it.
 

Guitarworks

Member
Messages
12,197
Well, The Red Special has only one bolt, but that's probably an isolated, unique example. Four is sufficient for most others. Six is extra secure for a bass I suppose. You could possibly get away with three on generally anything, but why risk it?
 

Jayyj

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,069
I think the poor press for the three bolt was that it was coupled with very sloppy neck pockets and a micro-tilt gizmo. With a decent neck pocket it should be more than enough.

There again, my old Danelectros do just fine with just two bolts and a sloppy neck pocket.
 

Blix

Wannabe Shredder
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
29,249
What Yamaha does on some of their basses are pretty solid:

overview_neck_joint_638x358_abe7f16a0b15c12752eeccd8c241e3b9.jpg
 

cap10kirk

Member
Messages
9,604
As long as it holds the neck to the body and doesn't allow it to move around, that's all that matters. 4 screws are the most common, some manufacturers use 6, and some even only use 2 and that still works just fine.
 

Blue Lizard

Member
Messages
1,176
Voted “4” as it’s kinda the magic number (and will be the runaway winner) for this, but my MusicMen do a good job of having a very neat & ergonomic 5 screw plate that I wouldn’t change.
 

colinesquire

Member
Messages
1,121
1,2,3,4 not including basses. It depends on the design too.

Are there examples of just one bolt? I think Taylor has a one bolt guitar.

SolidBody_neck_joint.jpg


Anderson uses 2, The neck and pocket have 45 degree walls. Probably with machine bolts/threaded inserts

file.php


Yanuziello uses 3 centering the third

Yanuziello_coppertop_2010_cons_neck_joint_1.jpg
Lots of supro/valco/national resoglass guitars were 1 bolt. They look like 2 with the silver covers but iirc the other is neck tilt. I had the jb hutto/jack white resoglass years ago and it was 1 bolt. My silvertone is 2 bolt. Never an issue.
 

Sofakingblue

Member
Messages
163
I had a '79 strat with a three bolt neck. If would pull bends too hard, I would hear click and the neck would move slightly, but just enough to go out of tune. I traded it for a 4 bolt '91 that I play today.
 

Wishing Wells

Member
Messages
194
I voted 4 because that's all you need most times but I also like the 4 straight + 2 toenailed screw configuration that Blix mentioned. Billy Sheehan insists on it for his basses. Might not be necessary for a guitar but I can't imagine a more rock solid attachment method.
 

Sweetfinger

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,861
It isn't the number of bolts, it's the design and tolerances that make up the design. Generally though, the kinds of instruments that use more than four are not the kind of things I like in any way, so there you go. Make a semi-hollow offset that's entirely covered in pearloid with more than four bolts and I'll revise my bolt bigotry.
 




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