How many steaks are safe to eat a week?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Jarrett, Feb 25, 2016.

  1. Jason_77

    Jason_77 Member

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    I don't have an answer for you; I just like this video:



    Actually, If you're eating sensible portions, I don't see why it would really be an issue. The key word being sensible.
     
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  2. Jarrett

    Jarrett Member

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    I feel like you are pulling my leg :)
     
  3. Jarrett

    Jarrett Member

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    I'm not grilling the steaks, but cooking them in a pan like this:

     
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  4. jaycee

    jaycee Member

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    Pay very strict attention to nutrition guidelines, both from a doctor and nutritionist. Read up until you know the proper serving size and proper frequency. After you've done all the necessary reasearch, forget everything you learned and do what feels right to you.
     
  5. derekd

    derekd Member

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    One of the things I've found moving toward a lean protein diet is it ups the acidity in my system.

    Ditching the carbs, particularly the bad ones has helped with reflux, but I get diminishing returns when eating too much protein.

    I think others have hit it by saying our body chemistries are all different, and we have to find our own balance. Good luck with it.
     
  6. hogy

    hogy Member

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    One thing to consider is that there is no such thing as a low carb, lean protein diet. That doesn't work.

    There are three sources of energy in human food:

    1. carbs
    2.protein
    3. fat.

    Essentially, that's it. So now you remove carbs, that leaves protein and fat. There is a metabolic limit to the amount of protein calories the human body can utilize, and it is surprisingly low. I'm going from memory, but it is in the 20-30% of total caloric intake range. More is not possible.

    So what is left to get the remaining 70-80% of energy from? Well, fat.

    And for that reason, any low carb diet you wish to survive is, by definition, going to be a high fat diet. No way around it. Google "rabbit starvation" to learn what happens on a low carb, low fat diet. It is the reason Inuit people eat seal blubber, it is also the reason why animal predators eat the fatty organs and brains of their prey and leave the back strap for the birds.

    And this is also the main reason why the quality of the fat you will be consuming on a low carb diet is so important.
     
  7. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Member

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    omg, I'm no vegan by any stretch of the imagination but I can't remember the last time I had a steak, never mind steaks per week. It's probably been 2 or 3 years since I've had a steak. And yet my stupid doctor keeps saying my cholesterol is too high and wants to put me on pills. I don't even eat that much meat never mind steaks. I swear they make up these guidelines just to try to get as much of the population on medication as possible so they can then start medicating us for the side effects of the blood pressure or cholesterol stuff they start you on.
     
  8. GasMask

    GasMask Member

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    Until science develops another detection method, I strongly disagree with this statement. Colon cancer is perhaps the single most preventable cancer (ignoring smoking caused lung cancer). A colonoscopy can detect and remove pre-cancerous polyps before they become cancerous. It can also precisely locate actual cancer, which if pre-metastatic, can be removed with a very high success rate. It's exceptionally important to do colonoscopies, and avoiding them is foolish.
     
  9. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Member

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    Is that per day or per week?
     
  10. RTR

    RTR Supporting Member

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    In my experience you can eat it as often as you like, as long as it's a lean cut. As @hogy stated, grain fed is the better choice. The diet choices you have ready made, (low carb/sugar) are the most beneficial IMO. So, eat all you like but mind your portion.
     
  11. hogy

    hogy Member

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    As I said, everybody is different, but for me (and I have monitored this), my "good" HDL goes way up (140ish) on a high fat meat diet, LDL and triglycerides go way down (into the 70s).

    I'm not a scientist, but I believe this is a genetic thing. I'm Northern European, I am here today because my ancestors survived thousands of years of ice ages. They obviously thrived on animal products.
     
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  12. Jarrett

    Jarrett Member

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    I've been following this one instead:
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. harmonicator

    harmonicator Member

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    It's all about the fat in the beef. Commercially raised beef's fat contains hormones and toxins. You want grass-fed beef. More essential fatty acids, CLA, no chemicals or hormones artificially introduced. Bison is also a great choice because they're not allowed to be commercially farmed.

    I think there was a blog post just the other day on MDA about this:

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/grass-fed-vs-conventional-when-does-it-matter-most/#axzz411PgwuH2

    Find a local small rancher offering 100% grass-fed and grass-finished beef and buy a whole cow, invest in a freezer for the garage. Eat it as often as you would like.
     
  14. bluesdoc

    bluesdoc Gold Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Denise Minger's Death by Food Pyramid is a good, informative read.

    Another factor is portion size. Limiting meat portions to the size of your palm helps keep from getting too much methionine, a health risk factor.

    jon
     
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  15. tholmes

    tholmes Member

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    How many will fit on your grill? Multiply that number by 7. There's your answer!

    Tom
     
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  16. Summa

    Summa Member

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    STEAK! Damn, now I'm hungry.
     
  17. AZChilicat

    AZChilicat Member

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    Thanks for explaining what a colonoscopy does...

    Ever crunch the numbers and do a cost/benefit analysis on a population wide scenario? Remember the rejection of the blue ribbon panel that studied mammograms? Then five years later that's now the protocol. What the hell do them people trained in epidemiology, study design, and biostats know, right?

    Before I "strongly disagree" with something I would make sure I had some knowledge in the field and the data set to hand. I really have no opinion who is right or wrong at this point, as I don't have the data set nor a working copy of SPSS anymore, but thought I'd put that report out there.
     
  18. aiq

    aiq Supporting Member

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    Birth father died from colon cancer.

    Two polyps removed at 54 after first scope. Negative

    Second one clean, the doc said not needed as often and if the next one is clean I'm done.
     
  19. GasMask

    GasMask Member

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    A cost/benefit analysis is certainly reasonable for any procedure, drug, etc.... Perhaps given the type of health care system in Canada, it should not be surprising that the study/recommendation you referenced came from there. (observation only, not a criticism)

    There's a difference between a cost/benefit analysis that makes a value judgment, and the statement that "there's no need for a colonoscopy", which implies lack of benefit. The current medical consensus is in strong agreement that there is an enormous benefit.

    Please let me give a couple of examples, and you'll see why I have some strong opinions on the subject. My mother had a routine colonoscopy, which discovered actual cancer. A small portion of her intestine was removed, and she has been 100% cancer free for years. In her case, it's safe to say the colonoscopy saved her life. My father (a retired surgeon) had received routine colonoscopies for years, but had reached an age where the doctor said he no longer needed them, so he stopped. A few years later, abnormal blood results led to the discovery of metastatic (had spread) colon cancer. He is dying now, and the lack of a colonoscopy will certainly prove to be fatal in his case. He regrets not continuing with colonoscopies. So I say to anyone who will listen- don't lie on your death bed wishing you had a colonoscopy- it can save your life.

    My apologies for the de-rail- you can return to discussing steaks!
     
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  20. Structo

    Structo Member

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    That doesn't include Kobe beef does it? :drool
     

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