How many would buy a Ernie Ball Musicman if necks were WIDER?

tremonti

Member
Messages
1,456
This should piss Sterling off, but....I don't care. How many like Ernie Balls but the necks are too narrow? I'd buy several if they were wider as I believe they make the best necks in the business.
:mob
 

shg

Senior Member
Messages
1,219
I always liked the look and tone of the EVH/Axis, but I wouldn't buy one for just that reason. Every time I've picked one up it felt like a toy. 1 5/8" at the nut is tiny.
 

mikeller

Member
Messages
1,478
It doesn't take much time to get used to the width. Once I got used to it, other necks started feeling clunking and awkward.

And like I said the JP models have a wide neck, and my JPX has very large frets.
 

turbolx5oh

Member
Messages
82
I always liked the look and tone of the EVH/Axis, but I wouldn't buy one for just that reason. Every time I've picked one up it felt like a toy. 1 5/8" at the nut is tiny.
I love the EVH, Wolfgangs, Peavey HP/CT and Axis for all the same reasons. LOVE the narrow neck!
 

PedalFreak

Supporting Member
Messages
5,886
I'd love to get an Albert Lee, but the necks are WAY too small. I'm a Music Man dealer, and I've begged them to make a larger neck for me, but they wont do a custom order like that.
 

djpatb

Supporting Member
Messages
260
I agree! I mainly play Gibson SG's, or 50's neck LP's. I used to have a Musicman Axis, and it was such a sweet guitar..but that narrow neck was a problem for me.
 

buddastrat

Member
Messages
14,712
I like the 1 5/8" width. Feels like a vintage Fender. Real comfy. What bugs me is their funky shapes and they always look and feel small to me, though I'm only 6'.

Play great and their frets are perfect. Love the oiled necks too.
 
Messages
11,135
i'm generally not a fan of the colors they choose though, and i've never found one that i absolutely have to have. if i did though, the necks are fantastic.

i think that the people who don't like MM necks are the same people who don't like Ric necks. both are selling very well though, so maybe it's ok that there's a guitar out there that isn't for you.
 

beej

Supporting Member
Messages
806
One builder can't be all things to all people. They make amazing instruments ... if you love them, fantastic. If you don't, you have lots of other choices in the market.
 

cutaway

Supporting Member
Messages
18,216
One builder can't be all things to all people. They make amazing instruments ... if you love them, fantastic. If you don't, you have lots of other choices in the market.
it's still off-putting that builders won't work with potential customers. like trying to get an ebony board on a PRS--having to go private stock, so it winds up costing you another 4k for an ebony fb. :(
 
Messages
11,135
One builder can't be all things to all people. They make amazing instruments ... if you love them, fantastic. If you don't, you have lots of other choices in the market.
exactly. people complain that Gibson makes 900 models and that they don't stick to a small core of products. but then people would complain that they don't make a product just for them. so you can't win.
 

beej

Supporting Member
Messages
806
Exactly, you can't win.

it's still off-putting that builders won't work with potential customers.
Here's the thing: if you're not buying what they're selling, you are not a potential customer.

I can't count how many times the discussion of why EBMM doesn't have a custom shop has come up. The usual argument is "they'd sell way more if they did", usually based on anecdotal evidence, or gut feeling. But there's really no way to gauge this. Like most successful vendors, EBMM knows who its big clients are - they're the big dealers (Guitar Center, overseas vendors, etc.), and they cater to them. That's good for their business. They're not interested in making one-offs, re-tooling for small orders. Demand is such that their production is already back-ordered for months, so this would set them back even further.

If you know Sterling, you know he very deeply believes in moving the instrument forward. He spends his own money (and a lot of it) developing things like the Silent Circuit (noise removal), tone block, compensated nut, renewable materials, switchable electronics (the "Game Changer"), etc. Some of these things make it into their guitars, some don't. Point being: they could have sold the same old models over and over, but they're putting their money where their mouth is, trying new things, working with artists on new designs, sticking to their core philosophy.

Downside is that they don't cater to individual requests. Upside is that sticking to their guns and taking risks has made them into the company they are today. IMO, they make an extremely high quality instrument at a very reasonable price, all USA built. Again, it's not for everybody (you have other choices in the market, including a handful of vendors who make EBMM clones with different specs).
 


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