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how steep is the learning curve on pro tools le

splatter

Member
Messages
1,018
I'm currently useing a boss br1600 cd for recording . I'm not happy with the finished product . It sounds good just not quite good enough .
I was thinking about getting a roland vs2480 then I started researching different ways to record and most people that get the kind of results I want use a computer . Even if they record it on a roland most of them drop it into the computer to polish it up . So I started researching computer recording .Pro tools is haled as the industry standard and it can be had at a very affordable price . I know there are LOTS of options in softwear and hardwear . However Everything I read says pro tools is user friendly so I figure why not get the industry standard rather than get somethng that may not do what I want . So I was wondering what the learning curve is like . I'm not afraid of putting some time in it . I just don't want to spend the next year trying to learn to use my new recording setup . Any input is appreciated .:D
 

mcholley

Member
Messages
76
Well, my experience, is that it can't get too much easier to get going. But like any program, the more time you spend with it the better you'll be

and as long as you don't walk away for long periods of time, you'll be amazed at how good you can get.

Take the leap, you'll love it.

Mark
 

moody07747

Member
Messages
1,203
Both Sonar and Pro-Tools are great programs but you need the Pro-Tools hardware to use the software... I use Sonar and prefer it since I do a fair amount of work with MIDI

I think you would be happy with either one and it all comes down to how well you can use your software to polish your tracks in the end...

I could spend $1,000,000 and give a top notch studio to a random person on the street but will the sounds be great in the end?
nope, because he or she has no clue how to use the software and get the most out of it.
 

rosscoep

Member
Messages
1,226
Depending on your area there are protools 101 classes at some community colleges. Cheap and informative. I did it was pleased.
 

MarkL8

Member
Messages
1,466
Both Sonar and Pro-Tools are great programs but you need the Pro-Tools hardware to use the software... I use Sonar and prefer it since I do a fair amount of work with MIDI

I think you would be happy with either one and it all comes down to how well you can use your software to polish your tracks in the end...

I could spend $1,000,000 and give a top notch studio to a random person on the street but will the sounds be great in the end?
nope, because he or she has no clue how to use the software and get the most out of it.

+1 When I was deciding platforms I went with Sonar. It just seems PT can be very finicky hardware wise and seemed like you paid a premium just because it is an industry standard.:BEER
 

Jayson Chance

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
439
Pro Tools is certainly fickle with hardware, but I think it's fairly easy to grasp in terms of overall use. I learned most of what I needed pretty quickly, especially with the included "Method One" DVD. It explains most of the basics.
 

teleking36

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,991
i, too, am moving from a digital recording console to a DAW setup. i'm deciding whether or not to go with ProTools or Logic. is there a huge difference between the two? i know that protools seems to be more widely used, so that may be the way to go; but i've heard a lot of good things about logic.
 

richpeax

Member
Messages
114
Pro Tools seems to be the studio standard, you can bring your le file to a studio and they can work with it. There are good instructional videos like Method one and Secrets of the Pros. I didn't know anything when I bought my system. A nice computer helps with lots of ram. There is so much you can do. All you have to do is get it on the grid. I cannot speak about Logic, never used it.
 

Brian Scherzer

Co-Founder of TGP
Staff member
Messages
5,147
I tried an all-in-one recording box years ago and never got the hang of it. I sold it and bought the Digi001 with ProTools LE and began recording with it the next day. I'm no computer tech guy, so I'd have to say that it was pretty easy. Believe it or noty, after mothballing the recording computer for about 3 years I just set it all up again and it was easy to do.

Having said the above, recording tracks is the easy part. Learning how to mix your tracks takes more time and effort. I don't mean that it is difficult to understand......it's difficult to get good at it without experience.
 

Grant Ferstat

Some guy in obscure bands in a far away place...
Messages
12,571
I actually find LE simple as far as the basics go and getting recording can be done within a very short time.

Obviously the the more advanced editing and sonic manipulation requires a bit of work but then again it's not like you'd start cutting tape on your first day as an assistant engineer in the analog world either!

The main reason I went with LE was compatibility with the systems in the studios that I've frequented but I've found that another advantage being the industry standard is that there is always plenty of people around to give you some good tips.
 

Tonefish

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,281
When it came time to upgrade, I considered both Sonar and Pro Tools. I'd like to think I picked Sonar because it was easier, but I may be biased by having used Cakewalk products in the past. I was also influenced by many who brought up that while Pro Tools was the standard, it was also difficult.
 

KungFuLio

Senior Member
Messages
696
DAWs under my belt...

ProTools
Digital Performer
Logic Pro
Nuendo (enough to be dangerous)

hmmmm all mac based, but that's another nasty thread

They all sound great, work great and took about the same time to learn.
 




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