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How the F wasn't Saraya bigger than they were?

cvansickle

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
12,331
I liked this band too, but I can think of a few reasons why they weren't bigger (my opinions, of course):

- A woman fronting a band that was dominated by male singers, for one. Sure, it's sexist to say, but it was the reality of the late 80s/early 90s. Glass ceilings weren't broken yet.

- By the time Saraya came along, the market for this kind of music was over-saturated and interest was waning. Nothing in their sound set them apart from the rest of the pack. And Grunge was knocking at the door.

- Besides the woman in front, no real visual appeal for the band, no visual hook or gimmick either.
 

Dasein

Senior Member
Messages
4,376
Loved Saraya but cvansickle nailed it. It was more of the too little, too late in the 80's.
Too little too late is the correct answer. It wasn't glass ceiling or sexism - it was talent and market factors....

Edie Brickell broke through in 1988 and proved that the market was hungry and eager to embrace female performers (and more importantly singer/songwriters). Though not given enough credit, Edie laid the groundwork and determined the direction for a lot of what followed and later became successful - there was an "alt" quality to her music and authenticity was front and center. You wouldn't have had Sinead, Alanis, or Sarah, or possibly even Courtney without Edie..... Unless you were purely a pop act in 1991, you really needed to offer more than a pretty face - but you also had to be Alt -- that's where music was going as far as original rock acts. Saraya were just not good enough and there just wasn't anything exceptional there that couldn't have been found anywhere in the trailing days of hair metal.
 

cvansickle

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
12,331
Too little too late is the correct answer. It wasn't glass ceiling or sexism - it was talent and market factors....

Edie Brickell broke through in 1988 and proved that the market was hungry and eager to embrace female performers (and more importantly singer/songwriters). Though not given enough credit, Edie laid the groundwork and determined the direction for a lot of what followed and later became successful - there was an "alt" quality to her music and authenticity was front and center. You wouldn't have had Sinead, Alanis, or Sarah, or possibly even Courtney without Edie..... Unless you were purely a pop act in 1991, you really needed to offer more than a pretty face - but you also had to be Alt -- that's where music was going as far as original rock acts. Saraya were just not good enough and there just wasn't anything exceptional there that couldn't have been found anywhere in the trailing days of hair metal.
I agree with your points, but can we really put Saraya in the same discussion as Edie Brickell?
 

RayRay

Member
Messages
2,505
I thought Andy Timmons was the guitar player for Saraya but it was the other Danger Danger guitarist.

Yeah, she could definitely sing. And that's a great song, IMO
 

T Dizz

Member
Messages
21,231
how the F could someone think this band should/could have been bigger than they were?

they're like "Whitesnake for girls":


they're actually a little better than i expected, but come on...
So funny, I just heard this on I heart radio a few minutes ago.
 

Dasein

Senior Member
Messages
4,376
I agree with your points, but can we really put Saraya in the same discussion as Edie Brickell?
Yes and no -- which is kind of the point too. I mean after 1991 Winger was basically DOA for the 3rd album.... how do you imagine a band like Saraya would have been receivedin and around 1991? And really - let's be fair - there was nothing really exceptional about her or the band at all right? it was generic.... as for rock you had Sass Jordan who started around the same time, Melissa Etheridge too .... generic vs unique -- Singer songwriters with vocal/performance chops (both established their reputations with live performances that killed...) Teased hair and New Jersey Cowboys were never going to break through at that point.
 

pak1001

Member
Messages
1,708
Bad timing.

There were a ton of bands that would have been much bigger had they come out between 1983-1988 rather than 1989-1993.

Saraya
Hardline
21 Guns
Spread Eagle
Sven Gali

Skid Row was really the last band of that style of music to hit it big.
Siren was a victim of bad timing, too:
 

DustyRhodesJr

Member
Messages
11,973
Bad timing.

There were a ton of bands that would have been much bigger had they come out between 1983-1988 rather than 1989-1993.

Saraya
Hardline
21 Guns
Spread Eagle
Sven Gali

Skid Row was really the last band of that style of music to hit it big.

Spread Eagle reminds me my nephew once played a show same bill
as a band called Dog E and the Styles. :D
 
Last edited:

Omega

Member
Messages
2,221
Bad timing.

There were a ton of bands that would have been much bigger had they come out between 1983-1988 rather than 1989-1993.

Saraya
Hardline
21 Guns
Spread Eagle
Sven Gali

Skid Row was really the last band of that style of music to hit it big.
Agree, especially with Spread Eagle. Had they come out a few years earlier, they would have been huge. Their guitarist Paul DiBartolo was/is a monster. He totally gave up everything, including his name. I really wished they would have been bigger.

They, like Saraya was basically timing. I saw Saraya open for Kiss at the Stone Pony and they definitely could play well. And they were really good, but "really good" wasn't good enough in 1990.
 




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