How to fatten up acoustic sound?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by mertas, May 2, 2015.

  1. mertas

    mertas Member

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    hi,
    i have custom build nylon classic and dreadnought, both equiped with LR BAGGS Anthem Stage pro going to AER compact 60.3

    what do you suggest to get more fat sound? trebles are quite thin now.
    thanks
     
  2. Gas-man

    Gas-man Unrepentant Massaganist

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    A compressor.

    I use this one on my acoustics.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. TheoDog

    TheoDog Silver Supporting Member

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    A simple Optical Compressor is always a nice bet
     
  4. guitarman_nebr

    guitarman_nebr Supporting Member

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    yep, that is it. I use one live and to record.....it is the secret weapon!!
     
  5. ctman64

    ctman64 Supporting Member

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    Eric Johnson uses the MXR bass compressor for live acoustic. Supposedly good for a whole lot of things other than bass.
    And of course, bump up the mids if you can.
     
  6. Blindjoedeath

    Blindjoedeath Member

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    How could a compressor fatten up a sound? All it does is limit the peaks. It's not fat at all. I'm not sure how or why one would fatten the sound. A compressor wouldn't be on my short list of options.
     
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  7. Barnzy

    Barnzy Member

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    I have an Empress ParaEQ Pedal that has alot of tone shaping ability in a small package. That's all you're asking for from your post...a way to shape your tone. The answer is EQ, and the solution is to choose an equalizer that boosts and cuts where you want. That's the easy part...the hard part is learning how to use an equalizer to boost and cut in the right places. Anyway...look at parametric equalizers.
     
  8. Gas-man

    Gas-man Unrepentant Massaganist

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    I don't really care how it does it, I just know it does it.

    Fatter is the only way to describe what it does to acoustics through a PA.
     
  9. mrpinter

    mrpinter Supporting Member

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    The now out of production Boss EH-2 Enhancer will get the result you want. If you don't want to go this route, an equalizer will certainly help.
     
  10. Drumnbum

    Drumnbum Member

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    Actually, that's just exactly one of the things a compressor is intended for - depending on how you choose to utilize it. Sure, you can keep your volume the same and merely use it to limit your peaks....but if you want to "fatten", simply clamp down on the peaks a bit and simultaneously raise the output volume. Bam! There you go. The RMS (average) volume rises, creating a fuller sound.
     
  11. wrathfuldeity

    wrathfuldeity Member

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    parametric eq like a vfe rocket
     
  12. Blindjoedeath

    Blindjoedeath Member

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    I guess we don't mean the same thing when we say "fatten" the sound. If a compressor works for you, I'd be the last one to discourage you from using it. To my ears, limiting the peaks just takes away from the dynamic range of the instrument and you lose a lot of it's natural timbre. So a lot of jangle and growl are lost, to my ears. That's all I'm talking about.
     
  13. Multicellular

    Multicellular Supporting Member

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    The MXR bass compressor does work really well on acoustic. The reason it fattens the sound, perceptually, of a piezo pickuped acoustic, is it tends to chop off the transients, which are trebly, more than the lower bits.

    That said, I use both a comp and an EQ. I think that's the best.
     
  14. gibsonjunkie

    gibsonjunkie Member

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    I use one of these - it adds a lot of presence (plus the EQ lets you dial in the sound. They can be found pretty reasonably now...

    [​IMG]
     
  15. OM Flyer

    OM Flyer Member

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    Maybe try some heavier strings?
     
  16. ballynally

    ballynally Member

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    a limiter as opposed to a compressor
     
  17. Cosmik de Bris

    Cosmik de Bris Member

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    A compressor can be set to bring the peaks down and the troughs up, this has the effect of increasing the mean signal level which sounds stronger to the ear.
     
  18. Lo Blues

    Lo Blues Member

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    I use a boss equalizer. Boost the lows a bit. Works wonders.
     
  19. Blindjoedeath

    Blindjoedeath Member

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    That may be true, but fatter? I'm still not convinced.
     
  20. Cosmik de Bris

    Cosmik de Bris Member

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    The problem with English, which you guys nearly speak, is that describing things like this are very difficult. What does "fatter" mean to you. what did "stronger" mean to me? We're becoming like the wine tasting club: "tastes like old french kitchen to me".
     

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