How to remove scratches from finish?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by RocknPop, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    Which one would you guys recommend if any? ScratchX, Novus, or GuitarScratchRemover?

    The scratches are on my Gibson Les Paul Classic so I'm guessing it's a nitro finish?
     
  2. guitarrhinoceros

    guitarrhinoceros Senior Member

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    If they are light, you should be able to just buff them out. Especially with a nitro cellulose finish.
     
  3. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    How can I do that? They are not terribly light, it seems like the shop repair gut was too rough when doing the fret leveling or something. There's a scratch as if someone had sandpaper and gently touched the guitar.
     
  4. modernp

    modernp Member

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    If you never take your guitar out of the house and idolize it I could see fixing it. If you play out it's just the beginning of scratches and dings.
     
  5. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    Thanks, I don't gig with this guitar. If you have something valuable to contribute feel free to reply.
     
  6. dazco

    dazco Member

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    Wet and dry sandpaper used wet, then a fine polish. Nitro is easy. The grit depends on the depth of the scratch. And of course if the scratch goes thru the clearcoat then theres no getting the scratch out wq/o going thru and ruining your finish. If i could see it i could tell you what you can do and what grit to use, but since i can't i'd suggest very very light such as #1500 or even 2000. It would take a lot to go thru the clear with that. And if the scratch isn't deep that will take it out leaving a hazy patina area that you can then buff to a mirror gloss with a final polish. There are many automotive polishes that'll work. Mothers scratch remover is one thats readily available. And if the scratches are light enough, that may even do it w/o sanding. So you can try that then if no go, then hit it with the paper. Use microfiber cloths to do any polishing.
     
  7. cjp54

    cjp54 Member

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    What dazco said! +100
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  8. gpro34

    gpro34 Member

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    Mequires Scratch X 2.0. I checked with a very well respected luthier here and it's what he uses. This product does not contain silicone either. You do not want a product that contains silicone. I used it on a guitar that had some deep scratches and it now looks like brand new.
     
  9. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    Here are the pictures of the scratches. What do you guys recommend?


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. dazco

    dazco Member

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    Yeah, that looks easy. Just use some mothers scratch remover and that'll likely do it. If not, try using #2000 wet and dry with water then the scratch remover. Should be easy. the only problem i see is the rest of the finish doesn't look very glossy/mirror smooth, so the area you fix may look smoother and shinier than the rest, so you may and up wanting to do the whole top.
     
  11. rabbuhl

    rabbuhl Member

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  12. Auriemma

    Auriemma Member

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    If your Tech did that... Take it back and chew his ass! Seriously! Let them fix it.

    Otherwise, what the others have said should work. I use Scratch X when the are light, wet sand and buff when more than that.
     
    T Dizz likes this.
  13. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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    Yeah man, I thought about that but he's so sloppy that I don't even want to waste my time going back there again - Geoff Benge. If you are in Chicago, stay away from this animal.

    Thanks for the rec's.
     
  14. tonydetiger

    tonydetiger Supporting Member

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    I swear by this stuff.

    http://www.guitarscratchremover.com/

    I've used it on guitars with pick scrapes, scratches from changing strings, and even buckle rash. It removed or lessened the scratches down to either nothing, or so miniscule that you have to be 2 inches away from the surface with a flashlight to see it. It's a little pricey, but a little goes a long way.
     
  15. dazco

    dazco Member

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    metal polish will do the same thing. I've taken poly guitars (which are extremely hard finishes) with tons of scratching like that black SG on that linked page and taken it to the secomd "done" pic easily. Most of those kinds of products are just like similar products for automotive or other and just renamed as a guitar polish. Theres more stuff like that on the market than you'd believe. Take a known type of auto polish, call it guitar polish or motorcycle polish or any number of things. Price it like the unique product you're saying it is and people will buy it. But mothers mag and aluminum polish or blue magic will do the same thing. Or for finer polish, mothers billet polish. In any case, whatever you use be sure to use a microfiber cloth, or better yet a "Peak" brand polishing towel. They are amazing and won't impart fine scratching like even microfiber because they are a super slick material that doesn't grab at all. The only way i've ever seen that works to polish plastic is any good polish and one of those peak towels. i was literally about to remove the pick scratching from a well used strat guard ! If you don't know how incredible that is, try it sometime with any other towel and the best polish you can find, even a plastic polish. You'll never make it look new but this will. really an amzing feat. Only place locally i've seen that sells them tho is pep boys. But you can get em online.... http://www.farmandfleet.com/products/638043-spa_polishing_towel.html#.Tz7LjoEdqHs
     
  16. RocknPop

    RocknPop Supporting Member

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  17. PhilF

    PhilF Member

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    Both of those will work just fine with polishing compound/scratch remover on them. I'd reccomend just going to Auto zone to get either the mother's or Meguiars scratch remover and a couple polishing pads. Sometimes they'll even come in a little kit.

    I suggest auto zone/napa/pepboys just because they are so easily found and generally the least expensive.
     
  18. dazco

    dazco Member

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    The peak SPA is the only one i know of like this. You have to feel it and try it to understand it's different. It's not black magic, but in many situations it will do what nothing else can. It really is great, and much different than microfiber. Microfiber is NOT scratch free. It DOES induce scratches even tho it feels soft. Because it grabs. If you try and remove wax from a car for example after it dries, microfiber will take it off easily. The peak towel will hardly remove it at all because it just slides over it due to being so slick. Sorta as if it were made of teflon. Thats the key....because its so slick it allows you to polish a finish with polish only, leaving the towel out of the equation. It may not be nesassary in most cases, but in some instances it will do what nothing else will.
     
  19. rockonomics

    rockonomics Member

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    It really depends on hwo bad the scratches are. I've had good luck with automotive rubbing compound followed by polishing compound. Sometimes you need to get more agressive and use fine (1500 grit) sandpaper to start working to 2500 and then rub and polish.
     
  20. evildik

    evildik Member

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