How would you handle this workplace situation?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by 27sauce, Mar 31, 2015.

  1. 27sauce

    27sauce Supporting Member

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    Long story short, we went down an employee recently, and I have had to pickup the majority of the slack. Before this took place i enquired about more money for basically doing 2 jobs. I was met with "we'll deal with it when it happens." Well, that didn't happen. The flip side is that we've had to compromise, and with that I'm basically calling the shots and it's working. We've had one of the best weeks in months in this situation. The compromise, is basically me being stubborn about working double for the same pay...

    What now? Keep going with me calling the shots, compromising, and it "working", or push for more money and do it "right", which wasn't really working?
     
  2. taez555

    taez555 Member

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    I'm going to go out a limb here and say that what you're experiencing is extremely common in the current economy, and quite a few people are going to chime in that they're in the exact same position. Consolidation of labor, with a larger burden being placed on fewer employees, for stagnant pay.
     
  3. Johnny Moondog

    Johnny Moondog Member

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    If you took on more responsibility AND it turned out better for the company, I think you SHOULD get a pay raise .
     
  4. Astronaut FX

    Astronaut FX Member

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    I'm not sure I follow. I understand that you downsized, and as a result, you've taken on more responsibility. You asked for more money, but I'm confused about the "compromise" and what that means.

    As to your basic situation, unfortunately that is one of the realities of the working world. At the moment, folks are either unemployed or over-employed (meaning doing the work of more than one but being compensated as one).

    The only thing I can do is point to the silver lining and suggest that over-employed sure beats the alternative. My girlfriend is going through the same thing (and so am I to some extent), and she gets pissed every time I say this. But the reality is, that it's true...being overworked and undercompensated beats the the heck out of not working.

    If this is a permanent downsizing, then the company likely did so to save money. If they dramatically increase your salary, they will have defeated the purpose of the savings related to downsizing. If this is a temporary downsizing, and the position will be filled, your taking up the slack without further pay will at a minimum get you some career currency, which I define as future opportunity.

    Probably doesn't make you feel any better.
     
  5. hellbender

    hellbender Member

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    Your boss will point this out in their Thursday staff meeting as a "win". It's a feather in his cap, not yours.
     
  6. Tylenol Jones

    Tylenol Jones Member

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    That's how I would present it.

    OP, the bottom line is you have to decide ;

    - how much you want to push this.
    - how much additional work you'd be OK with taking on (because it WILL happen).
    - if you're OK with potentially walking away if you don't get what you're looking for.

    If a company can get away with making one person work 3 jobs for the same pay, they'll do it. The company I work for at the moment has had a long legendary string of managers either quit or get fired due to performance issues. The problem is that the company asks insane availability times. One manager I know had to have conference calls during his vacation in his hotel room halfway across the world at 2am. Working 60-70h weeks and getting swamped with pointless paperwork for no reason other than the company wanting to micromanage...

    I was asked once if I was interested in taking one of those positions and I flat-out refused. One co-worker fell into the trap and got fired 2 months later. No thanks.
     
  7. BeBop

    BeBop Member

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    Well, if you have taken on more of a role in the music director department then for sure you should get a pay upgrade, especially if you are running rehearsals.

    Are they thinking about filling the slot? If not, then that is another reason for the pay upgrade.
     
  8. 27sauce

    27sauce Supporting Member

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    See, it hasn't been that simple. We have an MD who is caught in the middle of the whole thing. I basically told him, here are the songs, I've got everything covered. And it just kinda went like that. This week, no new material...I don't know where we're at. Me "calling the shots" sort of undermines the MD as well as my boss. Super touchy situation. I do not want anything to do with an MD type job

    And no, there's has been no talk of filling the slot. I'd be the last to know, though.
     
  9. 27sauce

    27sauce Supporting Member

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    Yeah, that's kind of what I'd like. I'm hesitant to rock the boat, but I sure don't want to bust my ass for free. I think they're looking at this as an opportunity to save some money, and good enough is good enough. This is one of those places where no news is good news, and everyone seemed to be pleased. I think I'm just going to keep doing what I do, until someone says something.
     
  10. ungarn

    ungarn Member

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    Additional responsibility and improved performance should translate into a bonus or merit increase...every industry is different.

    If you set the precedent that you are willing to do more work for the same pay, that will be the expectation moving forward.

    Give it 2 more months and evaluate then.
     
  11. T Dizz

    T Dizz Member

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    I had to re-read this part like, 3 times. ;)
     
  12. Fishyfishfish

    Fishyfishfish Member

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    I would look for a better job while working this one. It is only going to get worse, the more you can do, the more they want you to do. At least you are working!
     
  13. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    You forgot "incentivizing" them by playing the "in this economy, you're lucky to have a job" card...
     
  14. Staggerlee

    Staggerlee Member

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    Take in stride. What would happen if the company went the other way and decided not to pay on days where your workload is very low, like on a summer Friday for example. That wouldn't be very nice right?

    Keep doing what you are doing and find ways to prove your value and plot how to get a promotion out of this.
     
  15. JackJordan

    JackJordan Member

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    I once worked at a business that lost three employees from different departments and had me cover for all three. The Owner was supposed to come in and take up the slack, but after two weeks of me doing everything, he changed his mind without telling me. It was back breaking work and I never got a raise, despite taking on some very different positions that were way outside the realm of what I was hired for.

    After a year of this I asked for a raise, and was let go two weeks later.

    It worked out well for me though, I had already been interviewing elsewhere, just in case, and got a much better job for double the pay, days later.

    From my experience, if you like your job and can handle the extra load, don't rock the boat, and perhaps give a subtle hint instead. If you want a raise, or the work really is too much, have a backup plan and be ready/willing to find a job elsewhere. Unless you can find a job elsewhere, your employer holds all the cards, and you'll have to judge how fair and reasonable he/she is before proceeding.
     
  16. hellbender

    hellbender Member

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    It will take courage but if you are truly a person with the stars in their future it could work out nicely for you.

    Accept the additional responsibility with grace.

    Do a much better job than they expect.

    Adjust your wardrobe if appropriate.

    Spend time networking with those new people who you will come into contact with in the position.

    Never discuss a raise until its offered.

    Give your plan some time to show results before making a change.

    This could very well be your chance to change your life.
     
  17. crambone

    crambone Supporting Member

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    That is one of the few things that keeps people from letting their employees know how they truly feel about their job situation.
     
  18. Madsen

    Madsen Member

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    the "you're lucky to have a job" mentality is > "reward performance" these days & that appears to be coming from the top down.
    i've worked for several mangers who went to bat for me & were shot down.
     
  19. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    They have no reason to reward good performance, if they can get the same amount of work out of them by threatening them.

    Win/win for management.
     
  20. Madsen

    Madsen Member

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    i don't believe slaves perform better than free men.

    there's a big difference between companies that build a business from the ground up by respecting the talent that enables that growth & companies that borrow money to buy an existing business model & then suck the life out of it, in order to pay off the loan & pocket a few bucks.

    expecting the latter to behave like the prior is delusional, though there are usually 3-5 decent years of dwindling resources as the transition occurs.
     

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