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How's the Timmy clean up?

steeeve

Member
Messages
206
I have one on the way. I did a search, but had trouble finding info on Timmy cleaning up with the guitar volume rolled back.

I'm assuming it does this well, but any additional info would be great.

Thanks,
Steve
 

sweetpea

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
893
It cleans up better than any pedal I have ever owned. Cleans up like a good fuzz but so transparent. You will love it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:)
 

Logan

Member
Messages
161
Awesome, I have one on the way as well and I'm hoping it's very sensitive to guitar volume changes...


on the by and by; sweetpea -- are you ready to sell me that Addrock fuzz yet?!? Or is it still playing well with that Fargen? Ha!
 
Messages
103
This is my 2cents. I am running with a 77 SFTR. I am not blown away with it using it for an OD pedal. I do love it as a boost with a tad bid of grind. It sound particularly impressive boosting pedals that sound great to start with. It is like using a pre-amp (other ODs) into a power-amp (Timmy) to get a complete amp like tone. The Timmy is very touch responsive.

Here is how I run mine

Marshall Guv'nor (original black) into a Landgraff OD into a Fulltone OCD with the Timmy at the end to boost the other drives. This is where it sounds best with my set up.

Now a different amp and guitar might have very different results.

Elliott Edge
 

steeeve

Member
Messages
206
Elliot, those are good points, but I'm a little worried ;)

I am hoping the Timmy will cover my low gain sounds into a clean amp. I am excited to try it as a boost as well.
 

tonemandan

Member
Messages
2,372
Low gain into a clean amp or clean boost is what the Timmy does best. Cleans up with volume on guitar better than most pedals. Just order one! You aren't exactly risking anything since a used one routinely sells for more than the new price due to limited availability.

I promise you won't want to sell it.

Dan
 

6789

Member
Messages
2,855
I like the Timmy for a boost - it's the best boost I've tried. the overdrive part is subjective. many guys love it. with my guitar and amp I prefer the Blackstone Mosfet overdrive. The Blackstone doesn't have a boost though, but I found I really prefer to NOT boost the preamp tubes, I prefer to just turn up the amp and let both the preamp and power tubes overdrive or just use the blackstone for overdrive. I'm using a Victoria Regal and an old 60's no name japanese single coil guitar.
 

Ben C.

Member
Messages
6,863
Like some, I liked the Timmy as a boost to other pedals stacked after it, not so much as an OD in its own. I think the Red Snapper, LTD, and Gainster clean up much better than the Timmy, and especially found the Gainster to be the most touch responsive... a lot moreso than the Timmy. My 2 cents.

-Ben
 

jcshirke

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,482
For those of you who use the Timmy as a boost pedal with other drives, do you put it first or last in line?

Jeff
 

erksin

Senior Member
Messages
23,130
Originally posted by jcshirke
For those of you who use the Timmy as a boost pedal with other drives, do you put it first or last in line?

Jeff
I use it last since the EQ is so killer - makes everything that's in line before it sound better...
 

Fernando

Member
Messages
237
For those who don't like the Timmy as an OD, I ask why is that? I mean, could you describe what unpleases you about this pedal as an overdrive?
 

Ben C.

Member
Messages
6,863
Fernando- it all depends on the amp and guitars you're using. IMO, this pedal may like a darker setup. I'm using 6L6 based Fender amps for the most part with a variety of guitars.

It wasn't a bad pedal at all, just not right for me and my ears. OD's are so subjective... one person's 'buzzy' is another person's 'smooth' (e.g. the BBOD). One person's 'warm' is another persons 'muffled' (e.g. Mosferatu). So my take on the Timmy was that:

1) It was a little too 'splatty' - the OD was a bit harsh unless you rolled off the treble, then it was muffled. Rolling the volume off on your guitar just made it 'spitty'. Wasn't really a smooth transition to my ears, with my gear.

2) Low strings lacked attack. The attack on the higher strings was the proper 'click' or 'quack'. Sharp and defined. But on the low A and E strings, the attack was spongy and not defined... like a muted attack. Rolling the bass off didn't help... it just made it sound like you rolled bass off.

Other than that the pedal was very transparent and a great boost, but I wanted a different kind of low-gain OD I suppose. Different strokes for different folks. I ended up buying a Gainster, Silver LTD, PCB Red Snapper, BB Preamp, and PTP Red Snapper to A/B against eachother for a low-gain OD to suit me... kept the BB for medium gain, and both the PTP and PCB Red Snappers for low-gain... the PTP is very transparent, and the PCB is a little thicker and softer sounding (and I mean a LITTLE) and I can't choose which I like better.

This is all IMO, YMMV, etc...

-Ben
 

6789

Member
Messages
2,855
I just happen to like the low overdrive of the Blackstone for now. I used to like the low overdrive of the Timmy. I think it's kind of like a couple of people agreeing that they like the color blue, but there are many variations of the color blue. one might like a greenish blue while the other likes a redish blue. and pedals sound slightly different with different amps and guitars. Before the Timmy, I liked the low overdrive of the Fulltone Fatboost.
 

Johnny Raz

Member
Messages
499
Last time Timmy was over, he left the beer bottles and pizza boxes scattered all over my apartment -- In my experience, Timmy doesn't clean up very well at all!
 
P

prof2915

Originally posted by sweetpea
It cleans up better than any pedal I have ever owned. Cleans up like a good fuzz
Is this a general opinion?

I LOVE my Timmy, but the clean up is most definitely not its strongest point. (IMHO)
 

jcshirke

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,482
Doesn't its perceived ability to clean up depend on several other factors besides the design of the pedal itself? In other words, amp, amp settings, guitar used, and pickups installed all matter. So couldn't that account for peoples' perceived differences in how well (or not so well) the Timmy cleans up? Someone correct me if I'm wrong. I don't own a Timmy yet--"yet" being the operative word.

Jeff
 
P

prof2915

Originally posted by jcshirke
Doesn't its perceived ability to clean up depend on several other factors besides the design of the pedal itself? In other words, amp, amp settings, guitar used, and pickups installed all matter. So couldn't that account for peoples' perceived differences in how well (or not so well) the Timmy cleans up? Someone correct me if I'm wrong. I don't own a Timmy yet--"yet" being the operative word.

Jeff
First of all: The Timmy is a GREAT pedal :dude

Regarding the clean up, I´ve got guitars with singlecoil PUs as well as guitars with humbuckers.
I´ve got guitars with active electronics and guitars without.

Still I must say that I don´t think that the cleanup is as good as the one of some other pedals. (The sound however as good as the sound of "any" of the other really good pedals!!)

Regarding amp and amp settings I base this opinion on the use of a tube amp set as "clean" as an EL84 amp can be.
 

Ben C.

Member
Messages
6,863
Originally posted by jcshirke
Doesn't its perceived ability to clean up depend on several other factors besides the design of the pedal itself? In other words, amp, amp settings, guitar used, and pickups installed all matter. eff
When I posted, I mentioned I didn't think it cleaned up particularly well either. This is what I'm doing gear-wise. I've played it through a Fender DeVille, '76 Twin, '67 Bassman, TopHat Ambassador 50, Rivera M100, Rivera Rake and... I think those are the only amps I used it with since I got it in April. I ran them as clean as possible, and used pedals to add dirt.

Guitars used were a '92 Gilbson LP Studio, '83 Fender Strat Elite, PRS CU24, Ibanez RGT3120 (Tone Zone / Air Norton), and a Parker Nitefly. So we run the gamut with singles, humbuckers, active pickups, etc.

So my experiences in my last post were based on experiences with that set of gear.

-Ben
 

sstweed

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,117
I have had a Timmy for some time now. As an op-amp based circuit it isn't going to clean up near as well as a discrete circuit. The Blackstone, OCD, and certainly germanium fuzzes, set the standard for what I consider to be pedals that clean up well with the guitar volume. Using those pedals as a benchmark, the Timmy doesn't clean up well at all with the guitar volume. I don't believe that the type of guitar will matter too much in this instance. It could matter how your amp is set up. If the Timmy is goosing your amp into its own mild overdrive and you turn your guitar volume down, the Timmy could appear to be cleaning up, when in reality your amp is cleaning up. Either way the Timmy is still a marvelous pedal and mine isn't going anywhere anytime soon. I love fratzy pedals, and love when the bass breaks up a little. Thats what I love about the Timmy and the Blackstone. In fact about the only stacked pedal combination I like (I don't stack as a rule) is the Blackstone into the Timmy. I set both pretty low gain, and approx unity output levels, both Timmy dipswitches off, the two together have a magic spot (you'll have to look for it or they can sound bad together) that is better than either pedal by itself. I use this sound alot. Very fratzy in a very good way. Cuts through mixes like crazy, loads of harmonics, lovely course texture. Feels like a small to medium tweed, but sounds huge. Think saxophone, not violin in texture. Cooler yet, because the Blackstone cleans up sooooo much better than the Timmy, when I back my volume off it is like the Blackstone drops out of the mix leaving the Timmy alone. Then mix the Blackstone back in as needed. Makes for a VERY flexible on-the-fly arrangement. I have come to accept that while cleaning up with the guitars volume is part of the art, it is also a valuable tool to have a few things that don't clean up so well. What if I need to be quieter, but not cleaner? This is very often the case when I play at church. The song selection there can run the gamut from totally clean, to all out pop crunch, to wailing lead, to quiet as a church mouse, all in the same service. And I don't want to have to readjust the amp and mess with the sound man or the on stage volume which through all this must remain low (I use a Weber mini-mass as well). I work way harder at church making my non-master old clean tube Fender Deluxe and pedals work in all circumstances than I do at louder gigs outside of church. Flexibility is a premium commodity for me. The Timmy has become a particularly important part of that flexibility for me.
 




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