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I am the worst at stringing up guitars. Help

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by sssmile, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. sssmile

    sssmile Member

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    I am the worst at stringing up guitars. Help
    I seem to always screw up one or two strings.
    I constantly ruin strings, and have alot of slippage.
    Can someone give me a good method, that
    prevents the most slippage, keeps your guitar in tune
    the longest, and won't ruin the strings? Does anyone
    else have a tough time with stringing up a guitar?
     
  2. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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  3. Chuckracer

    Chuckracer Supporting Member

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    Oh No!

    I do a little guitar set-up work on the side, and when ever someone brings me a guitar with the strings "tied" on the tuners like that, it's an immediate $10 up-charge for the PITA of getting the old strings off.

    Just put three to four smooth winds on the tuning peg spirialing downward and you'll be fine.

    http://www.precisionguitar.net/STRINGING.html
     
  4. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    I've found on my electrics (mostly Strats/Teles) if I measure the distance of about 3 tuners past the tuner it's being strung to it works perfect on all my Strats/Teles. On a LP I'd only do one peg distance past the string's peg since it's 3 a side.

    As for my acoustic I think it's 1 peg length (3 to a side so there's more distance there).

    That is the extent of my formula. I don't tie them or do anything special. I have had no issues since I learned my measurements. When the guitar isn't Klusons I just cut off the extra string right at the other side of the peg.
     
  5. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    That's the right way, and as the diagram specifies, use the string lock technique. I do so, and never have any slippage problems. If stringing with vintage 'split' tuners, utilize 2 - 2 1/2 peg lengths before cutting. AC
     
  6. DaveG

    DaveG Gold Supporting Member

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    Locking tuners make life so much easier... :AOK
     
  7. shallbe

    shallbe Deputy Plankspanker Gold Supporting Member

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    Pull the string tight, start wrapping from the bottom of the post, about three times around, THEN tread it through the post hole, bend it at a 90 degree angle, tune up and clip off the extra. Works every time, easy, quick, no need for string winders.
     
  8. Rock Johnson

    Rock Johnson Member

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    Ever since I got my first guitar, it just seemed obvious that the correct way to put strings on would be exactly as you described. I've NEVER used the various "locking" methods, because that creates a weak point in the string where one crosses the other.
     
  9. RGB

    RGB Supporting Member

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    I gotta agree with Chuck and Rock here. I pull the string tight through the post, clip it off 1- 1.5 inches on the other side of the post, back it up until it's nearly flush with the post and start winding so the wraps go down. No problems with slipping or tuning, even with a whammy bar on my old strat, (to a point, of course). The locking method does create a weak point and used to be the method suggested by Bob Taylor of Taylor guitars, but they now recommend that you use the method I use....which I learned on Taylor's site, btw!
     
  10. Badger71

    Badger71 Member

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    -Place tuning peg hole so it's parallel with the nut.
    -Feed strings through bridge and through nut slot.
    -Use thumb to hold string in nut slot.
    -Wrap string tightly around tuning peg starting low and working upwards
    about 2.5 to 3 winds. Don't go above tuning peg hole.
    -Feed string through hole and pull snugly and then sharply upwards away
    from the peg.
    -Clip excess string.
    -Tune to pitch.

    This is how I've done it on guitars that I've owned without locking tuners and it works just fine.

    Seymour Duncan does this on his "pickups" video tutorials on the seymour duncan website. You can watch the vid to get a better idea.
     
  11. lowendgenerator

    lowendgenerator Member

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  12. Giraffecaster

    Giraffecaster Member

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    i don't do the "tied" method but i just make sure there is about 3 turns around the peg to make sure it doesn't slip.

    one thing a lot of people forget to do when they change strings is to pull them before they tune. once everything is tight i hold the string down with my palm around the 12th fret, give a yank upwards (guitar is laying on it's back), then move my palm and the yanking position closer to the nut a few more times. make sure it's stretched out but be careful esp on the high e because i've broken strings before that way. play it after it's stretched for a few minutes doing big bends, and tune once more. you shouldn't lose tune again.
     
  13. Dana Olsen

    Dana Olsen Gold Supporting Member

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    I've been doing it like this on non Fender type tuners since the 70's. Works great.

    You do have to watch that you don't "tie knots" in the string - just crimp it back so the first winding holds it down. When you change strings you DO have to uncrimp it, which is a slight pain, but it holds well while playing.

    As far as the other methods described, I don't like that many windings on the post - for the high strings it's cool, but for the low strings it increases the break angle too much for me - makes 'em feel unnaturally stiff when I try to bend 'em. (At least that's my recollection - I haven't tried another way to string my guitars in decades - if it ain't broke ...)

    I highly encourage everybody to try different ways like the ones described above and pick one that works for you. Unburst and I use the way the above link details, but that doesn't mean YOU have to.

    Dana O
     
  14. hucklebee

    hucklebee Supporting Member

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    What is the stringing process with locking tuners? I have heard that instead of the equivalent length of two-three tuners (assuming in-line of course), you use a lot less distance. Do you know of a website, or can you walk me through the proper stringing process?
     
  15. Badger71

    Badger71 Member

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    Loosen the lock....on my Schallers and Sperzels the lock is underneath the headstock. Some locking mechs are on top of the pegs themselves. Thread new string through bridge, up the nut slot and into the tuning peg so that the string goes into the hole and out away from the guitar headstock. Again, have the peg hole parallel with the nut or at a 45 degree angle. Pull the string tight....no need for any slack. Tighten the locking wheel. Tune to pitch.
     

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