I changed picks today and like the attack better

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by HeeHaw, Feb 5, 2005.

  1. AndreasG

    AndreasG Member

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    Picks make a big difference. For me standard Fender heavies work best because they wear fast, and I love worn picks, and second I can move them around while playing, something I can't do with a textured surface.
    Plus, I play a lot with my fingers, which sounds even better, but I suck so much at it, I'm not confident enough to make the complete switch....and my fingers hurt....:D
     
  2. Ken

    Ken Silver Supporting Member

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    When I play, I use several different picks and use them for different songs as required...

    For example, a really funky rythmn tune would need a thin pick and for a classic rocker I always go to a med or heavy pick depending on the song...

    Scott is right, its a great EQ tool...

    So maybe we should have a new section on the forum...

    Just about Picks :)
     
  3. TechpriesT

    TechpriesT Member

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    my favorite picks are the ice-pix copper flex, they bring out treble and have an ungodly amount of attack
     
  4. el34power

    el34power Member

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    Dunlop Gels Extra Heavy. Great for pinch hamonics
     
  5. Rockin J

    Rockin J Member

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    The Gels are the best sounding pick I've found. They wear down on the edges fast and then sound even better. True about the pinch harmonics as stated above. I use the mediums. The Gels dont slip as much as most smooth surface picks.
     
  6. Powerslave214

    Powerslave214 Member

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    I like those as well. I only have one of the 1.0 mm that a semi-local dealer got as a sampler from Pickboy. I'd love to order some 1.14s, but Pickboy only takes minimum orders for bags of 50 at $37.50. They're impossible to find in stores around here.
    I love the Dunlop Jazz III XL! I order those by the bag.
     
  7. amper

    amper Member

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    For me, it's Clayton Acetal rounded triangle picks, in .38mm, .50mm, .63mm, and very occasionally, .80mm. I also like the Dunlop Ultex .63mm picks, but not enough to bother paying the high price compared to the Claytons. I buy them in dozen lots of each gauge at a time, then promptly lose them all over the house...

    The .38mm's usually only get used for acoustic strumming, sometimes for electric strumming. The .50mm's are my "all-around" pick for electric work. The .63mm's I generally only use for electric lead work, and the .80mm's when I'm feeling particularly aggro.

    Personally, I can't understand why anyone would use anything heavier than those .80's...I'd break strings if I used anything heavier! I really like the "snap" that a lighter pick adds to the sound.

    Oh, and I *only* use rounded triangle shape picks. I can't hang on to the "standard" ones.
     
  8. bvmjethead

    bvmjethead Member

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    I've been using metal picks for years now.
     
  9. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    Really true.

    I had been using a fairly heavy pick in the last few years, and heavier strings (just 0.011 but still relatively heavy. In my older band days I used 0.009 and thin Fender picks) and had been really improving but got frustrated on "fanning" chords, and some other faster things, and even bending. BUT...been using those for at least 5 years.

    Just a few months ago I went down to 0.010 strings, and just recently trying thin picks again. It is like I took weights off my hands and fingers.
    I just was blown away by this.

    Only downside...strings break more often, picks get that little crack near the tip way more often (the thicker ones I used to have to visually check as they wore down to nubs...but usually didn't split). I think it is worth it.

    In the meantime, I had also gotten WAY more used to just using fingers, so when the pick breaks, no problem, it is still easier with the slightly lesser strings... this is like opening up a whole new world for me.
     
  10. Souled Out

    Souled Out Member

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    +1, yes for me the first year was very tough. Now I can't play as well with pick. Every time I try I miss the tone and pinching things I can do with my fingers. Trying to play chords with same timing and syncopation as with a pick is daunting in the begining. My speed with leads has acutually increased by not trying pluck every note and using more hamer ons and pull offs with pinching the first note with my fingers. My thumb has really improved. I LOVE the syncopated tone of my thumb holding down a bass beat and the other fingers poping at other notes in the cord at the same time producing mini melodies. Back to the thread, still like using pics for other tones and like mentioned before use all thickness and styles to try and achieve different results. It all started for me when going to watch acoustic finger pickers and being blown away hearing bass lines and melodies at same time.
     
  11. waxnsteel

    waxnsteel Member

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    I really dug the Ultex. I think they sound great. I break the **** out of em, though. I play tortex, myself, varying degrees of thickness. Red and orange on acoustics, sometimes yellow. I use Blue or green with electric. I like a good point on the pick, too. Dunlop makes a pick called "the wedge" that is a lot like the tortex, except the picks are white, seem slightly stiffer for the given thickness, and have more of a point. My current fave.
     
  12. g3rmanium

    g3rmanium Member

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    1. Get lots of picks:

      [​IMG]

    2. Buy and use Pickboy Edge picks because they're great -- small, but comfortable, and hard but not inflexible. And also because they sound differently from all the Dunlop Nylon stuff. The nylon stuff sounds like *wap* *wap* *wap*. The attack of the Edge picks is much higher.
     
  13. VanStone

    VanStone Member

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    My favorite picks are the Dunlop 1MM Big Stubby, and the Clayton Ultem .8MM (rounded triangle shape).

    V
     
  14. msp

    msp Member

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    no one has yet to mention my favorite pick by far

    i love heavy attack

    adamas grafite pick (a few months ago a buddy told me that its the same pick used by jerry Garcia) its 2.0 mm super thick (made of rock) and never gives in no matter how hard you play

    i love the tone of a super thick pick (can give the illusion of the tone of having super thick strings)

    been using them for atlest 7-8 years maybe longer cant really remember
     
  15. Brett Valentine

    Brett Valentine Member

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    I use Dunlop X-Heavy Standard Gels (the yellow ones). They come the closest in tone and response to the 2mm D'Andrea Ultra Plecs (clear) which have the most amazing range of tones, from hard and bright to warm and woody and almost no sound of pick attack (the Ultra Plecs sounded almost soft when they hit the strings, but were very hard).

    Other than that, I've been using my fingers more (I really like the fatter sound the strings get and the precision you can get with multiple fingers, not to mention the funkiness you can get playing tight, percussive rhythms). When I really want to get expressive, I find myself using fingers more these days. It just seems to be more "direct" and more "human" sounding (does that make sense or am I drinking too much green tea?)

    And at that, I find using picks (any corner and/or edge) and/or fingers (or a combination thereof) has become my favorite way of changing tone. Still need to practice with fingers more.
    Brett
     
  16. msp

    msp Member

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    yeah i hear ya i think my fingers hit the strings just as much as my pick

    just developed the style over the years with out even noticing
     
  17. le_plastique

    le_plastique Member

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    Anyone ever try Fred Kelly Polycarb picks? They are by far my favorite.

    www.fredkellyspicks.com

    :) C'mon. Click it.
     
  18. Powerslave214

    Powerslave214 Member

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    I'd visited the Fred Kelly site awhile back....one of the "I'll order some one of these days" items.........and I have a LONG list of those!
     
  19. ejbidiot

    ejbidiot Member

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    I prefer the Dunlop Jazz III's; they're stiff enough to really dig into the string, and they're angular enough to be very articulate and fast. They are small and relatively unforgiving, and I thus tend to switch to the 1.14mm Tortex after a few beers.
     
  20. Occam

    Occam Member

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    I'd really like to find something that's between the attack of a metal pic and the warmth of a fender extra heavy jazz while being the same or similar size of the fender jazz but with more grip to it. I like the metal pics for eerie clean passages...you can really hear them grind on the wounds of the string and with some reverb this sounds really evil.
     

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