I.D. question on older, Seventies-look-alike Strat bridge

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by HelloKittyHawk!, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. HelloKittyHawk!

    HelloKittyHawk! Member

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    I acknowledge that a photo would be more helpful than my attempt at a description,
    but...
    I just received a parstcaster, which seems to have been assembled in the very early eighties
    (although the bridge looks to have been switched, at some point).
    Its bridge is a dead ringer for a seventies, one-piece Strat vibrato bridge, except that neither the saddles nor the block have part numbers stamped into them.
    The saddles (otherwise identical to 70s Strat parts) have a stamped "F-in-a-circle" on the back, below the string slot. They're magnetic - steel, I guess.

    The block is chrome plated, except for its bottom surface. Probably some kind of pot metal.
    The bass side of the block is flat, while the treble side is rounded, like a typical Fender, and it has shallow string holes.

    Has anyone encountered a bridge like this?
    An import of some sort?
     
  2. 83stratman

    83stratman Supporting Member

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    Vintage or narrow string spacing? My buddy has an '83 Kramer that came with a bridge that is a dead ringer for a '70s one piece Strat bridge, except it is narrow spacing and mounting. All this prooves is that there were non Fender bridges out there that were one piece.
     
    HelloKittyHawk! likes this.
  3. HelloKittyHawk!

    HelloKittyHawk! Member

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    Thanks for the reply, 83stratman.
    It appears to be regular Fender spacing.
    I have noticed some brass bridges, on Kramers of that era, that have '70s Fender, block-type saddles, unlike the ones typically seen on the late-'70s/early-'80s American brass hardware, and I've had other Japanese one-piece vibrato bridges - I think they may've been the norm on copies of that time.
     

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