I feel like I don't have much to say right now (musically)

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by josh_michael, May 9, 2015.

  1. josh_michael

    josh_michael Member

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    There was a time when I used to write and work on songs probably every week. But I think it's probably been a good maybe.. i dunno 4 years since I've consistently wrote. I guess I just feel like I really don't have anything to say (or at least that hasn't been said before). I mean I always come up with guitar stuff, but haven't really cared enough to turn them into songs. I've never seriously pursued a music career or anything, and I think a lot of people write for the sake of their music career maybe, and kind of whip themselves into writing ( :horse ) I don't really care, it's just something that I realized recently cause that used to really be my thing.. anyone have similar experience?

    -Josh
     
  2. neoprimitive

    neoprimitive Member

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    I can relate, for the last 12 years I haven't had anything musically to say.
    I hate to admit it but I actually do have things to say musically but not with my guitar, only when I power up my synthesizer and play simple orignal stuff. I'm not even a very good keyboard player, but somehow I create things that say something and go somewhere. I've been playing guitar for 37 years and I think for now I've lost my way. i still love playing, but I can't play anything worthwhile that is original from my gut. it sucks!
     
  3. josh_michael

    josh_michael Member

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    Yeah, I guess that's what you call being in a funk! But on the other hand, I think maybe if what once worked doesn't work anymore, we just have to go with what does for now, and that's OK.
     
  4. davebc

    davebc Member

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    Only a point in time. Find a new/different source for inspiration to get the juices flowing.
    For me Gear ALWAYS lights the fire.
    (I can't have girlfriends anymore. My wife is funny like that)
     
  5. ZeyerGTR

    ZeyerGTR Supporting Member

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    I go through phases.

    First, there are a lot of times when I just have to plow through and work. If it takes two hours to come up with just the right line to end the second verse, so be it. I'm not a believer in just "waiting for the muse." The muse tends to shows up when you work.

    That said, if I'm really not feeling creative I work on something else more mechanical - reading, theory, mechanics, rhythm. It still moves me towards my goals, but it requires a different part of you.

    Sometimes you really do just need a break to recharge. Read a book, go camping, listen to music or go to an art show. Life! That's the inspiration.
     
  6. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    I disagree with the first couple of posts. If we take Malcolm Gladwell's findings (Outliers), then you need to show up at the page everyday and write. It isn't just about inspiration, good or bad, but about reps. How many tunes did the Beatles write we never heard to get the couple hundred tunes we know and love? I have a friend who got signed to a record deal a number of years back, and one of the first things he was asked before the offer was, how many songs have you written?

    Writing, whether poetry, fiction or music, is a discipline and skill set. Those who are successful find a way to do it most every day. Going through lulls or dry spells is normal. Pushing through and showing up anyway makes us better.

    I wish you luck with it.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2015
  7. kcprogguitar

    kcprogguitar Member

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    You're now a musician, not a guitar player.

    Run with it. Fire that mofo up and start writing some tunes!
     
  8. stevel

    stevel Member

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    It's called maturing.

    The biggest contributing factor to this IMHO is that as we mature, we come to realize that the things we found so new and fresh, are actually not as new and fresh as we thought - they were new and fresh to US, but the rest of the world has already worn them out, and moved on.

    Ignorance is bliss.

    I used to write a lot of songs when I was 18. Maybe up until I was in my early 20s. And, by the way, the world was a lot smaller then, because this was before You Tube and the Internet as we know it.

    But if I were 18 and went on Tube today, I'd see millions of kids just like me churning out the same crap. It's like some people hear rag on "cover" bands saying why would you do that when you can write "original" music and that "original" music is better because it's creating your own thing - only their music is anything but "original" and you're not "creating" anything - you're merely sticking the few things you've been exposed to together in a different order...

    When you're 15, and you've listened to music for 3-5 years, and it's been a single genre, you're going to write like that because it's all you know. Some people never grow out of that. But others grow musically, and experience more and more styles, learn more about music, learn what makes a great song versus a mediocre song, and come to the realization that if you're not "in" the industry, you're not getting in, etc.

    So in other words, what happens to many of us as we mature is we realize, it's not becuase WE don't have anything to say, but it's because now we know - because we're no longer ignorant - that everything's already been said before.

    And because we're creative people, we don't want to do what everyone else has done - we want to come up with something new. But because VERY LITTLE is new and exciting to us - unlike when we were 15 - it's much much harder to be happy with what we come up.

    I know every time I sit down to write something, I think, "where have I heard this before". When I was 15, I didn't care - I shameless stole everything I heard.

    I think what makes writers writers is that they learn this early on, and are able to adjust their philosophy. I think they're able to see what they do not as "copying" but as maybe "inspired by" and "an homage to".

    I think though that you might be putting a little too much emphasis on "writing" as a measure of your musicianship. Sure it's historically the most heralded position (we remember Mozart, and Beethoven, but none of the other great performers who weren't composers from their time and modern songwriters are the ones who get the credit, not the session players) but there are MANY other ways to be creative and channel your inspirations in music.

    Secondly, I think your point about whipping themselves into it - you may have heard the phrase "a writer writes". Songwriters probably have 10,000 ideas - some inspired, but some not, and only a very few of those get crafted - and CRAFTED into a well-written piece of music. And that's the catch - I think you, like many might also be under the impression that it's inspiration that creates good music.

    Ok, sure, there are the mystical tales of the few great songs that were written at an inspired moment in a bar written down on a napkin. But that's not how MOST music is written. Most music is CRAFTED.

    Once you learn about the studio process, you also come to realize that MOST of the songs we know and love came in to the recording studio incomplete, or if they were complete, they were torn apart and re-worked. The number of great songs that were "re-worked" before being released would astound you. And there are MANY stories of a songwriter who had this idea for like 20 years that they couldn't complete and then finally found the thing that put it together.

    So you don't need to be inspired to write. You need to be inspired to LEARN THE CRAFT of songwriting, and then have the desire to take ideas that may magically come to you at an inspired moment - or not - and craft them into well-written songs.

    Or string 3 chords together and use sex, drugs, and or rock and roll (lake, tight blue jeans, and silverado if it's "country" music) in your lyrics to make an unoriginal original.
     
  9. Drak

    Drak Supporting Member

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    Everything has a time and a place, not everything lasts forever, nor is it meant to sometimes.
    Sometimes the season simply just passes for a particular interest.
    Sometimes it will return and sometimes it won't, and all of that is part of the rhythm, the heartbeat, the cyclical nature of your own life.

    There's not a thing wrong with letting something go if it's naturally leaving anyway, it's usually a sign that something new is on the horizon and if you spend your time chasing the old, you'll miss the right timing for the new thing.
    Clinging to things that have no interest in you/with you anymore is wasted effort and can lead to a boring rut of a life.

    I ran into a very similar experience myself many years ago.
    I've been building guitars for almost 18 years now.
    For the first 10 years, the passion built and built and I built guitars at an absolutely furious pace and I loved every minute of it, sometimes I would have over 15 different guitars under construction and handled it all quite well.

    Then about 7-8 years ago, it just left. Boom. Nothing.
    Like out of nowhere, and I was really puzzled.
    I chased it for awhile but the interest really had just left and it felt forced when I tried to resume it.
    No interest at all for about 4 years, then it came back of it's own accord but at a much more relaxed pace and it felt refreshing and enjoyable to pick it back up again when it felt right to do so.
    I hadn't gotten rid of anything, it was all still here just collecting dust.
    I then started to realize how the ebb and flow of life worked, and how to see it for what it is.
     
  10. josh_michael

    josh_michael Member

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    First of all I just want to say that there are some great, great... posts here. And I appreciate all the thoughtful replies.


    Couldn't agree more with this. Everything I want to say musically (at least in this point in my life) I feel has already been said/done and done well. So I really don't have anything that valuable to contribute. But whenever I do try and put something down, like you said, I think: "well so and so already did something pretty much like this."

    Totally agree with you. Well said.



    Also it's a good point what a few of you have said about the craft of writing. I think it truly is a skill to be developed. However, I guess cause I'm really not in the music industry, developing this craft doesn't have much value to me right now. Especially, like I said before, most of the things I want to do/say musically have already been done (probably because I heard them do it first!)
    Who knows, maybe my interest will spark again, maybe if I was collaborating with others, I think that sure gets the juices & drive flowing. But, oh well, right now I'm pretty content just playing my music for pure enjoyment.
     
  11. freedom's door

    freedom's door Supporting Member

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    My job is so draining that i don't have the desire or energy to work on new music during the week. If i pick up the guitar, it's to play some Bach pieces, or play something i've already written.
    If i have time on the weekend, i'll come up with something new (creating always comes easy for me), but i usually just make a quick demo, and leave it at that. I don't feel the need to turn anything into "finished product" at this time.
    It doesn't bother me too much, as my interests are elsewhere these days, but it is nice to still be musically creative to some degree.
    OP, i don't think you should force yourself; just follow your muse, and accept things the way they are.
     
  12. Hollis

    Hollis Member

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    As I've gotten older, I've realized I'm never going to be a rock star lol. I'm not really inspired to write, however I have found enjoyment playing in a cover band. Some people on here like to put down cover bands as if those musicians are somehow lesser than original bands. I find playing in a cover band extremely rewarding. I have a good day job and I have a great time playing in bars/casinos. So, a good cover band might help to fill the void of not being able to write. Either temporarily or permanently.
     
  13. josh_michael

    josh_michael Member

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    I think you're right, feel the same way.

    It's been about 5 years since I've been in a cover band. But yeah I agree if it's the right music a cover band can be so much fun.
     
  14. sventvkg

    sventvkg Member

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    Same boat since 2012 bud. Living and trying to make something happen in Nashville cleaned me out. Wrote so many good tunes I have enough for a lifetime....No one wants to hear anything unless you're famous and I can't stand the music business or anything it shites out so I'm just not compelled to bother. That said I'm back to making money playing music and that's just fine:)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. torxuzang

    torxuzang Member

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    I think maybe if what once worked doesn't work anymore[​IMG]
     

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