I finally cranked the mids

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Dorianrock, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. TonePilot

    TonePilot Supporting Member

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    I play in a band but I also play to a lot a backing tracks. I find that a guitar tone on its own can sound harsh and brittle but in the mix, sounds just gorgeous.
     
  2. Papanate

    Papanate Gold Supporting Member

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    That concept is one many Guitarist (and Bass Players) learn when they first get into a real Studio. It was that way for me - My first year in studios I came in All dialed in with what I thought was my tone
    from the heavens. First thing the Producer does is get the engineer to 'fix' my amp sound on the board. I wouldn't call it thin as much as narrow banded with a Peak very cutting Mid Frequency emphasized.
    The mix I heard in my headphones was my glorious full range tone - when I went into the Control Room - I was flabbergasted at how funky I sounded isolated and I started to complain - but dang o dangsters - the Producer pulled the band mix up I was Gobsmacked - and very humbled. Making guitars and bass fit into a mix with vocals, drums and keyboards is a skill - figuring out how to make them sound amazing in the mix is a by product of very talented ears.
     
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  3. xjojox

    xjojox Tardis-dwelling wanker Gold Supporting Member

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    Boogies are incredibly mid-heavy by nature. The smiley-face "scooped" EQ setting on a Mark series Boogie is still very thick in the mids. Well, unless you *really* scoop out the middle, but Metallica didn't do that. Plenty of honk in the lead guitar, just some added chunk at the bottom.

    This. You can't put the bass much higher than 2 or 3 on a Boogie preamp with high gain, they are too thick in the bass and low mids. It's a mess. You dial in a tight singing tone, then the EQ compensates after the fact to bump the bottom and top a bit. But you still end up with a mid-heavy tone, just a bit less so. Especially at higher volume when the power stage kicks in.

    A truism about BF and SF Fender amps is that the clean tone is extremely bright and scooped, allowing the singer to sit in the middle zone of the scoop. Then when you solo, you either push the amp or step on a TS type pedal, which punches the mids up and kicks you out in the mix.

    Even the glassiest of Mark Boogies (think Mark III) don't have as much sibilance at the top or booty at the bottom. It's still a hard glassy clean sound but it's punchier in the middle than a Fender with less sparkle. The Mark II even more so, almost tweedish on the clean side.
     
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  4. Funky54

    Funky54 Member

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    There is no reason for insults
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
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  5. Papanate

    Papanate Gold Supporting Member

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    Edit...am I that dumb...you are making a joke right? Good One.

    Excuse me? How am I insulting anyone by pointing out that for guitarist (like me- who I was pointing out) have to learn how to play in bands and recording. It's experience learned either through a mentor or on ones own time.
     
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  6. macdolfan904

    macdolfan904 Member

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    Took me a second. But when I got it, I cracked up. Pretty funny.
     
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  7. Papanate

    Papanate Gold Supporting Member

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    Yes it is - I was all indignant - then it dawned on me. It's is really funny...
     
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  8. Bankston

    Bankston Supporting Member

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    Exactly right. And if you tune the guitar down and play syncopated rhythm patterns in a band mix you'll completely disappear.

    Scooping the mids in a high gain tone gives you the sizzle but none of the steak.
     
    CJReaper likes this.

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