I had never heard of Status Quo until last Friday!

DRS

Member
Messages
11,327
They're fairly well known in Canada. Not huge like Slade was, but not obscure.
 

dazco

Member
Messages
13,878
pictures of matchstick men played on my transistor around late '67 if i recall correctly
Never got into them or bought any albums by them and couldn't tell you one of their songs EXCEPT for that one. Pictures of matchstick men is one of my most memorable songs from the 60s. I loved that song and once cassettes became the norm i always had a copy of that song on a mix tape. Funny i never heard anything else by them till the internet, but then what i heard on youtube i never cared for. So to me at least they were indeed a one hit wonder. That was a pretty popular song back then that was played on the radio quite often.
 
Messages
49
FWIW. If you like your guitarists to be proper rock n rolling, hell-raising, drinking, drug-taking, over-do-it-ers, you’d have enjoyed a night out with Francis & Rick. Apparent Rick Parfitt didn’t leave much of life un-lived. :dude
 

ned7flat5

Member
Messages
4,499
Back around ‘73 in Oz, they were very popular appearing on GTK, a ten minute music program on the national broadcaster at 6pm every evening hard rockin’ through huge Sound City stacks with super long hair and, unusually, regular street clothes.

Until then, they had been regarded as a forgotten ‘60s mod act of “Pictures of Matchstick Men” fame.

It was this reinvented Quo that, along with Foghat, brought rockin’ boogie to the table. We all immediately bought the records and learned all the songs. Rossi’s melodic solos were also basic enough to figure out which was helpful.

I can only recommend a handful of albums starting with Piledriver.

As things often happen, the recipe got lost due to inner band tensions over who ran the band and determined its direction. Consequently, the later albums are nothing to write home about.


 
Last edited:

BADHAK

Member
Messages
8,676
They were huge here in Oz in the 70's and one of my first concerts was Quo in about 78. Can't say I was ever a big fan but I enjoy tracks like Roll Over Lay Down, Down Down, and their 76 album Blue For You is a ripper.
 

gr8gonzo

Member
Messages
82
They were huge here in Oz in the 70's and one of my first concerts was Quo in about 78. Can't say I was ever a big fan but I enjoy tracks like Roll Over Lay Down, Down Down, and their 76 album Blue For You is a ripper.
One of the first concerts I went to in 1974 - Quo at Festival Hall. Mind-boggling at the time - a wall of AC30s, Rick & Franks bouncing across the stage, loud. Great fun. Also caught their last 4 tours of Oz and again it was great entertainment. Rick was a machine kinda in the Malcolm Young vein well before Malcolm.

Lots of people write them off as a simple 12 bar band but if you scratch the surface there's more going on. Lots of alternative tunings, some very nice changes. Bob Spencer (ex Angels) & his band did the entire 12 Gold Bars album - reckons he's never worked harder in his life.
 

ned7flat5

Member
Messages
4,499
One of the first concerts I went to in 1974 - Quo at Festival Hall. Mind-boggling at the time - a wall of AC30s, Rick & Franks bouncing across the stage, loud. Great fun......
I was at the Brisbane Festival Hall show that same tour pressed up against the stage. It was an exciting show and I think it’s fair to say that no one (other than possibly Foghat) had that sound and style.

I remember that Rossi, Parfitt and Lancaster had extra long guitar leads and, for the encore, they deliberately walked around each other’s space until the guitar leads were totally tangled and formed a large pile of cable, at which point they unplugged and departed the stage, leaving the roadies to sort out the mess.
 

Nyarlathotep

Member
Messages
408
I remember being disappointed when I heard their version of "You're in the Army Now." Sabaton's cover demolishes it.
 




Trending Topics

Top