I have tried everything! Hollow body feedback

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by deluxeman, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. deluxeman

    deluxeman Member

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    Well I have an older Washburn J6S, nice playing/sounding guitar. I use it when I play with a community band/chourus. There is about 50 singers and 55 musicans that play brass and woodwinds. We have a drummer and a bass player. Both good and not very loud.


    My problem is when we practice I have very little feedback issues. But when it is time to perform live it howls like a banshee. of course the volume is up by 1/3rd and we are packed in a bit tighter. I am in the back row, amp on my left about even with my chair facing forward. I have this thing stuffed with foam, F-holes covered and taped and I am using a Mesa Boogie MKIII with an eq. I can dial out some of the feedback with the eq but it still likes to go on certain notes/chords. Mostly B flat and E flat. Of course with horns every song is in b flat of e flat.

    Is there anything I am missing? I heard you can point your amp at the guitar and some of it will improve. I can't do that because I am not mic'ed and the sound wont carry. When I dial out some feedback the tone becomes thin.

    I am sure these pickups are cheap and may not be potted very well, Maybe a pick up swap is in order? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. RossNRoll

    RossNRoll Member

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    switch to a solid body guitar! hahah.. Plenty of great choices for that style of music and you won't have to worry about feedback unless you play very loud, close to the amp, with high gain drive.
     
  3. doctorx

    doctorx Member

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    Pot the pickups or tape the F holes.
     
  4. deluxeman

    deluxeman Member

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    F holes are taped already. I will try and pot the pickups next. Thanks
     
  5. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    There are a few things you can do. Flip the phase of your input with a known clean boost or whatever that reverses phase. One phase relationship or the other will generally feedback way less. You can do this with a home made polarity flipping speaker cable too.

    Bail on the pickup and use a saddle or bridge transducer type of system with preamp. The pre-amp will help you manage it.

    Get a closed back cabinet and position it downstage of your location.

    Move the amp off stage, and supplement the speaker with a little extension cab that does not excite your instrument.
     
  6. frankiestarr

    frankiestarr Member

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    You might try snubbing up the two pu screws on the back side of the pickups, but not gorilla tight...or pop the covers off, and put a piece of painters tape on the slugs, or a dab of silicon under neath the cover, then snug them tighter, all these have helped me in various situations
     
  7. Blauserk

    Blauserk Member

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    GP member Ulysses (J45 on the LP Forum) has had posts made and inserted in his guitar by a luthier to support the top, which I believe he has reported cuts back on feedback.
     
  8. mike barth

    mike barth Member

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    I stuffed my EMG 81 & 60 equipped Yamaha SA-2000's f holes (Gibson ES 335 copy) with furniture/ pillow/ batting, stuffing. No more howling and a minimal alteration of tone. reversible too.
     
  9. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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  10. Stratobuc

    Stratobuc Member

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    Sorry. I have a Reverend PA-1 and it does the same thing at stage volume. My solution (you aren't going to like it...)......













    telecaster
     
  11. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Silver Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I've done this to a couple guitars. Works like a charm. Not for the squeamish.

     
  12. electronpirate

    electronpirate Member

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    Took me no time at all to wax pot my LP PUPs. Damn thing squealed like crazy over certain volume. Went from my 'cringe to pick it up' to my number 1.

    R
     
  13. GuitarTampa

    GuitarTampa Member

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    Ok. I am being serious.

    You are not able to hear how loud you are.

    When I first started gigging I was never more than 4 feet from my amp. Ever. I had a Rivera Concert Fender Tube amp, and I had no idea how loud it was. I was making my ankles deaf. And I would never understand why people would walk away from the band...

    The sound frequencies of the guitar can take at least 4 feet for you to hear how loud you are. It's just jargon but people talk about the "Throw" of the amp... Different amps seem to have different distances from them before you are able to hear what the amp really sounds like.

    So what is going on right now? You are too close to the amp, and therefore not only can you not hear it, but also you are too darn loud. I know. Seems crazy. But that is what's going on.

    Try using a plexiglass baffle or something like that. Or if you have to crank your amp up all the way: Turn it around and have them mic it like that and run it through the monitors. That's what I used to do on tour with AC30s You can still hear it from behind. And they can still put it in the monitor. Just don't be a goof and change the tone settings / volume levels from practice on stage.

    Additionally because you are parallel to the amp you may be changing the tones of the amp to make your "ear" sound better. That's wreaking havoc on the actual recorded / live tone.
     
  14. GuitarTampa

    GuitarTampa Member

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    Ok sorry, I didn't read the post.

    Put the amp in front of you. Yeah it seems crazy. Set up your tone while standing in front of the amp. Then sit behind it. You can always put a guitar bag or something behind the amp to stop the back throw of the speaker. Your speaker in proximity to the front of the stage can adjust your total volume with the eintire band.

    But in reality that is probably not the right guitar for that application, you would have better luck with a guitar that is a hollowbody but has a center block. Or you could resort to dicing up some auralex into small pieces and stuffing the guitar full of it, and then clear-taping up the f-holes. (seen the old rockabilly guys do that on tour).

    Best luck!
     
  15. John Coloccia

    John Coloccia Cold Supporting Member

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    Sorry...not meaning to be a wise ass...but just use a nice solid body for the gig. No one in the audience is going to care, but they DO care when they can't hear you because you're not loud enough, or when you get feedback. That's really the solution that will make your life easy, won't affect anything material, and will get you back to making music without having to struggle with equipment. Why struggle with this when the goal is to make music?
     

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