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I just bought a Gibson ES 335.

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by tomkatzz, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. tomkatzz

    tomkatzz Member

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    Rather, my wife bought it for me for valentine's day. The high gloss red one with hardshell case for $1850.

    Two questions.

    The "ES" means Electric Spanish. What does that mean?

    Second, the strings were old so I put some 10s Fender Silver Bullets on it until I can get to the GC. What size strings are optimum for this? (I currently use 10s on my Les Paul and Strat.)

    thanx



    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2009
  2. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    I dunno when these terms became obsolete, but gtr playing used to be catagorized as either one of two styles:
    "Hawaiian", played horizontal, flat on your lap, stopping the strings with a steel bar instead of fretting with the left hand.
    Spanish style, like most folks play. The "modern" six string fretted gtr design was mostly standardized in Spain.
    Gibson designated their "hawaiian"-style, electric lap steel gtr models EH, and electric "spanish"-style gtrs ES. The ES desgination seemed only to apply to hollow and semi-hollow electrics (I don't think there's a solid body ES model?), while all EH gtrs were solid.
     
  3. bluesjuke

    bluesjuke Disrespected Elder

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    Congrats on the nice guitar and especially the bice wife!

    I currently have two and have had many others. One of the best guitars you can get.
    I use 10-46 on mine.
     
  4. oscar100

    oscar100 Member

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    that goes back to the dawn of gibson :eek:
     
  5. HRydarcik

    HRydarcik Member

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    Congrats on your guitar!

    String gauge is a matter of personal preference...I use 10s on my 335 but whatever gauge you like will be just fine.
     
  6. paul1122

    paul1122 Member

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    10s or 11s will be fine. I go back an forth. What ever set I have close at hand
     
  7. tomkatzz

    tomkatzz Member

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  8. Think Floyd

    Think Floyd Member

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    Back in the late 70s - early 80s Gibson had the "Firebrand" series of guitars which included ES models. I used to own a ES-335-S. The "S" at the end of the model name stood for "Solid Body". It was a double cutaway solid body with the general outline of the semi-hollow ES-335.
     
  9. bluesyjacuzzi

    bluesyjacuzzi Member

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    I like my 335 and les pauls with 11s. definate improvement in tone. give em a try you might like em too.
     
  10. tomkatzz

    tomkatzz Member

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    This guy:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Gibson-ES-335-S...5|66:2|65:12|39:1|240:1318|301:1|293:2|294:50

    ......is selling something similar and is calling it the "Studio" model. The same?
     
  11. OM Flyer

    OM Flyer Member

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    Putting .11s on my ES-339 really improved the tone. With Gibson-scale guitars, you can move up a gauge and still bend with ease. Congrats on your new Gibson!
     
  12. Think Floyd

    Think Floyd Member

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    No, I think that's just an older "lower-priced" regular ES-335, just like a Studio LP vs. an LP Standard, or a Faded Finish ES-335 vs. the standard glossy finish ES-335. The "Firebrand" models were all solid body guitars.
     
  13. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    Well, not exactly. Gibson was started around 1900, and EH and ES (electric gtrs) were not introduced 'till 1936.

    As regards this statement:

    With Gibson-scale guitars, you can move up a gauge and still bend with ease. Congrats on your new Gibson!

    Maybe so, but I hadda strange gibson experience. I've used nothing but a .011-.052 set on all my electrics (mostly fenders) for years. Then I bought a used Firebird, and played it for a while with the strings it came with before restringing. I put on my regular set, and the gtr ceased to be a fun and enjoyable inst to play. I dug the original strings outta the trash, and put a micrometer to 'em: .009-.042! You coulda knocked me over with a feather. I went out and got a set of my brand in .009, and whattayaknow...the gtr plays great again. And this is from a fella that mostly plays 25 1/2" scale gtrs.
     
  14. blusman

    blusman Member

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    Sweeeet.......I got chocolate!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  15. BigPapiFan

    BigPapiFan Member

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    I always thought "Electric Spanish" referred to archtop guitars with f-holes as opposed to flat-topped guitars with round center sound holes. But I could be wrong; that happens frequently.
     
  16. SFK

    SFK Member

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    No that ones semi hollow.

    The 335-s had a smaller solid body with the general 335 outline.

    Here's one:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Sh5Hm6JER8
     

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