I just learned "Smoke on the Water!" Heh, heh..

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Guitar Non Hero, Aug 10, 2019.

  1. ant_riv

    ant_riv Supporting Member

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    One of my favorite musicians ever, and undoubtedly my favorite guitar player.

    Even when he is ‘phoning it in,’ his playing still excites me.

    I also enjoy what he is doing with Blackmore’s Night.
     
  2. Lef T

    Lef T Member

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    If you got it down,you should definitely be heading down to your nearest GC to show off your latest riff.
     
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  3. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Member

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    I spent a few weeks exploring the stutter he got in that solo. I never learned the solo itself, but the way he drags triplets there is something I like and occasionally use.

    I'm not a huge fan, but I heard enough of his playing when I was a boy that it has certainly influenced my playing.
     
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  4. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Member

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    I'm not sure I agree with all of what you say, but it's an engaging point you make. I know what caught my ears about him when I was young was his classicism. My mom played both organ and piano, gospel and classical, and Bach was on around the house.

    When I first heard DP was Machine Head, when I heard "Highway Star" with its solo, I got it.

    I do think Hendrix explored and added as much to our rock guitar vocabulary, but that's a matter of opinion. I think "Bold as Love", "One Rainy Wish", and some others were up there in changing how guitarists approached their instruments. It works for me.
     
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  5. MilwMark

    MilwMark Member

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    Thanks for posting that.

    Picture of restraint.

    Something lots of rock guitar players could learn. Musically anyway.
     
  6. Brutus

    Brutus Member

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    I can’t even fingerpick my nose, but you can get real close with a flatpick if you slant it a lot and get some flesh in there. It’s fingerpicking with a pick.
     
  7. HeavyCream

    HeavyCream Member

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    Every time someone tells me “I can play Smoke On the Water”, my reply is, no you can’t :p
     
  8. mrbill

    mrbill Member

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    There's a guy on YouTube, Satsuma3042, who does a cover of Smoke on the Water from Made in Japan that is amazingly accurate, right down to little ticks in the song ( like the noodling, volume swell, and three string scratches at the beginning before the main riff starts ) that I've never seen included in other covers.
     
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  9. Hiighway Chile

    Hiighway Chile Member

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    Sidenote..I played the first few bars of the solo and one of my lady friends said it sounded like Santana:rolleyes:

    Play the riff and people assume you're some newbie.but then break out that solo and people start paying serious attention...

    Had another who said it sounded like Gabor Szabo lol.
     
  10. hotrats73

    hotrats73 Member

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    The main problem with Blackmore is the songwriting.

    He and his mates wrote some big and immortal songs but also tons of average (or less) songs.

    And his songwriting is one dimentional compared to other big names.

    He is an highly skilled player but that's not what matters more.

    That's my opinion.
     
  11. stratamania

    stratamania Member

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    Thanks for your detailed answer. Its interesting as this term underrated is thrown around a lot and often without reason or real thought.

    I don't think I am lined up totally with your assessment. Certainly in the 70s in the UK along with players such as those you mentioned Blackmore was revered as a player and not rated any less. Deep Purple was a huge band etc. Although in later years you do hear more about the other players in articles etc.

    So I suppose it depends on your point of reference, when and where you grew up, exposure to different music and which circles you moved in, magazines, music papers available in your area etc. At which point in time someone becomes aware of a player, band etc probably makes a big difference as a point of reference.

    I started a thread about the term underrated a while ago if anyone wants to add anything.

    https://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?threads/underrated-players-or-songs.2066034/
     
  12. ajoep

    ajoep Member

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    Ritchie is definitely an accomplished musician and a guitar virtuoso.
    I agree with the fact that he's underrated but i think mainly because he never wanted to be in the spotlight plus the rumours of being a jerk.
    The man was and still is a solid songwritter, a riff machine and a terrific lead player.
     
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  13. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Member

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    MIJ is the version that I always hear in my head when I think of SOTW, as it was my introduction to the song. So much that the little flub he makes in the beginning is how I want to play the main riff, not how it appears on Machinehead.

    Ritchie was my main impetus to take up the guitar about 6 or 7 years after the Beatles turned me onto guitar in Feb 1964. I tried to get one of those guitars with the three things on the front (didn't know what they were called) but they were too expensive for 12/13 year old me. I had to settle for a hollow body yamaha 2 pickup ES style beater. Then I bought a new Princeton Reverb and for some reason never could get that MIJ tone. Years and years and many fuzz boxes and distortion boxes went by and I still never got that sound. It wasn't until years later when I realized it was modified Marshall and a freaking volume level that even my neighbors would have objected to.

    *oh, and thank you for that lead. I found the video and will be studying it for a while.
    domo arigato.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019 at 5:29 PM
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  14. tycobb73

    tycobb73 Supporting Member

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  15. Dasein

    Dasein Member

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    This can be a really good exercise learning a cover N4N.... doing a deep study.
     
  16. Hiighway Chile

    Hiighway Chile Member

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    Yea and he would point it a Ian Gillan for no other reason than to be a prick lol.

    Ritchie has said that he wanted the Marshall to sound like his favorite Vox Ac30..

    He even said that they stuck an AC30 inside the Marshall...

    But Ritchie trolls alot so who knows if that is true.
     
  17. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Member

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    A cranked AC30 would be easier to live with than a modded Marshall Major ... maybe :D
     
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  18. Guitar Non Hero

    Guitar Non Hero Member

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    You have solved a riddle that I had. Now, I know how he has so much seamless sustain - a combination of that cranked amp and his flawless technique. Gives the guitar a continuous "singing quality." You can also hear some carefully controlled, slight feedback in his music.
     
  19. BADHAK

    BADHAK Member

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    Love the raw, honest tone of Strat into amp where you can hear the strings on wood. And he shows so much restraint on the verse and chorus that when you hear the amazing solo it's like going from a beginner to a virtuoso.
     
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  20. gr8gonzo

    gr8gonzo Member

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    He's also an excellent study in minimalist rhythm playing. Handy to have Jon Lord doing most of the harmonic heavy lifting. Listen carefully to what the guitar is doing - its not much. A bit of a chord here, a note there. Very understated. Mary Long is a favourite for just that reason. It also has the slide over the top tho to add a bit of variety.
     
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