I love my Beam Blocker

Heady Jam Fan

Member
Messages
9,009
I put it in when I put in a new speaker.
Everything sounded awesome, but it was hard to tell how much to attribute to the beam blocker.

I was recording today and wanted to see if I could get a better sound without the Beam Blocker.

It pushed a decent bit of treble outwards (to the sides), but absorbs a good amount of it too. Still some beam, but nothing glass-shattering anymore.

I can run my amp with more treble, which makes the preamp happier too I think.

And no phase issues that some people mention.
 

riffmeister

Member
Messages
16,615
My VVT cabs have integral "beam blockers", they do cut down on the beam directly in front but the cabs still sound awesome.
 

rockon1

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
13,271
Watch out you might get the beam blocker police after you! There are those here that will tell you it doesn't work or doesn't work properly. Dont care about the technical BS blockers work for me too. I use simple CD blockers I hang from my grill but its essentially the same idea. No one gets blasted and the sound is more even/dispersed. Bob
 

cardinal

Member
Messages
5,316
I love the Mitchell Doughnuts for the same purpose. I settled on the doughnuts for the top two speakers and nothing on the bottom two. Kinda happened by accident but sounds better for some reasons that will all four (and of course way better than none at all).
 

Blue-moon

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,633
I had one in a blues jr. It did very little to solve my issue. But I don't blame the beam blocker. The amp just wasn't for me....too ice picky. It was one of many attempts to beat that amp into submission. Man, that amp was the definition of a money hole.
 

No457 Snowy

Senior Member
Messages
972
+1

I read all the techno-babble, there's actually a thread with pages and pages of it and then decided to try it for myself and make up my own mind, since they aren't that expensive, and I've had positive results using one.
 
Messages
1,408
Not for me, I tried them, but didn't need them to block high end. I was hoping they would widen the sweet spot. Just sounded odd to me.
I can see why people like them though if you set your amp on the bright side.
 

trailrun100s

Member
Messages
3,569
On the other hand, if you have the right speakers/cab/amp and know how to EQ and place your amp, I don't find beaming to be a problem...I'd rather have that high end permeating somewhere in the club or else the sound will become too indistinct...
 

jkr

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,425
On the other hand, if you have the right speakers/cab/amp and know how to EQ and place your amp, I don't find beaming to be a problem...I'd rather have that high end permeating somewhere in the club or else the sound will become too indistinct...
You can't solve the beaming problem with many amps by simply saying it can be done by "knowing how to EQ and place your amp".
 

Stu Blue

Member
Messages
3,167
+1

I read all the techno-babble, there's actually a thread with pages and pages of it and then decided to try it for myself and make up my own mind, since they aren't that expensive, and I've had positive results using one.
(Sigh) Why do so many TGP members prefer marketing B/S to scientific explanations? Lazy minds prefer comfortable lies to awkward truths?

Note: there is NO beam coming from the centre of a speaker therefore beam blockers cannot change the directionality of any speaker. The loss of treble as you move off axis is caused by all frequencies being radiated by all parts of the cone. As you move off axis there is a different distance to each edge of the speaker and the same frequencies arrive at different times and you get phase cancellations of the shorter wavelengths.

All 12in speaker "beam" the same, all 10in speakers beam the same, as do all 15in speakers... the size of the cone determines the frequency that beaming starts at ... the bigger the cone the lower the frequency that "beams".

ANYTHING you put in front of the speaker is likely to change the TONE of the speaker but solid stuff placed in the centre will make the beam worse as sound waves bend round it. The DIRECTIONALITY will be worse even though you have lost some treble due to the blockers causing phase cancellation issues. IE it's easy to change the tone of a speaker but almost impossible to improve it's directionality (which is the "beam").

Only Jay Mitchell's doughnut design (foam with a hole in the centre) improves directionality but at quite a big loss of top end (tone)... not for folks who like to dime their treble knobs.
 
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trailrun100s

Member
Messages
3,569
You can't solve the beaming problem with many amps by simply saying it can be done by "knowing how to EQ and place your amp".
Sure you can...I've done lots of gigs where I can place my amp and nobody in the club that's watching gets beamed...(or anyone in the band)

And some amp/speaker combos don't sound harsh even when you stand directly in front of the beam...For instance, my 4x12, while yes, they are directive as hell, actually sounds pretty darn good straight on...Maybe it's the X pattern of speakers I have in there? Maybe it's a nice sounding cab and the head I use is not harsh at all (PWE EH3)...
 

6789

Member
Messages
2,854
(Sigh) Only Jay Mitchell's doughnut design (foam with a hole in the centre) improves directionality but at quite a big loss of top end (tone)... not for folks who like to dime their treble knobs.

Finally, a donut lover admits there's a big loss of top end. Thank you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Stu Blue

Member
Messages
3,167
On the other hand, if you have the right speakers/cab/amp and know how to EQ and place your amp, I don't find beaming to be a problem...I'd rather have that high end permeating somewhere in the club or else the sound will become too indistinct...
Correct :bow

You can't solve the beaming problem with many amps by simply saying it can be done by "knowing how to EQ and place your amp".
If you set the EQ reasonably even then the tone change as you go off-axis is gradual, progressive even. If you run wildly different setting on each knob so you have peaky tone this will be made worse by the beam. Running the bass and treble knobs the same on most pro amps works fine for keeping the treble under control and acceptable to the audience.

A lot of "ice picky" top in the beam comes from unbalanced setups on the guitar... every thousandth of an inch really counts here.. more than you might think.
 

trailrun100s

Member
Messages
3,569
Finally, a donut lover admits there's a big loss of top end. Thank you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I used them for a while...I wouldn't say a big loss of top end...But something was a bit different...I prefer to let my speakers be naked now, haha...
 

trailrun100s

Member
Messages
3,569
Running the bass and treble knobs the same on most pro amps works fine for keeping the treble under control and acceptable to the audience.
In fact the knobs on my PWE are almost at noon across the board...And the plexi is pretty even as well, with bass really being the only knob that I tweak to taste...
 

Stu Blue

Member
Messages
3,167
Finally, a donut lover admits there's a big loss of top end. Thank you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
:spit
Er.... Long ago Jay Mitchell actually published graphs showing exactly how much top was lost. To even the amount of treble being radiated you either have to increase the treble off axis (not possible) or cut the treble in the beam on axis (which the foam doughnut does). No-one has been hiding this.. your sneer is entirely unjustified and several years out of date, and out of touch. :Devil

EDIT BTW I don't use doughnuts since I run my JTM45 all tones at max and can't bear drop the treble even a smidgen... I run fenders mostly at noon(ish). I tested the foam doughnuts to see for myself if they worked, which they did.
 

rockon1

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
13,271
ANYTHING you put in front of the speaker is likely to change the TONE of the speaker but solid stuff placed in the centre will make the beam worse as sound waves bend round it.
This is so easy to try I'm surprised you haven't noticed the second half of this statement is not true. The tone will change but the beaming will also be reduced. Take's me 10 seconds to A/B ,with and without,using an old CD hanging from the grill. Don't care about marketing BS and all the "scientific explanations" are moot after that. Bob
 

louiscyfer

Member
Messages
99
the foam doughnut works. i have tried it and it did get rid of the death beam the audience directly front of the amp experienced. i did lose quite a bit of definition, my tone seemed to get more lost in the mix, even when i turned up louder.
some here don't seem to care when the audience gets blasted with that beam. if you have the amp facing the audience, you'll still adjust the tone where it sounds good from your point, so the audience (at least portion of it) gets a significantly different sound than you do. if you lean the amp back, and face the speaker towards yourself, you'll again set the tone that it sounds good to you, and your guitar will get lost to the audience (portion of it). i have confirmed this by placing recording devices in both places, and how different the guitar sounded in the mix. so i started pointing the amp a little out, more towards the wall, but at an angle, so nobody is in the way of the beam. i got a more uniform sound, but not good enough. i started turning my amp around (in small enough places) and that worked awesome. the sound gets bounced off the wall, and mixes into the rest of the band, and get a very uniform mix in most of the room. i really like it that way. you can also turn up more without anyone complaining, it just blends in, and i hear pretty much what the audience and the rest of the band hears.

most people don't realize that the bigger the speaker, the more directional it is, so an 8" actually covers a much wider area than a 12. it is still true with multiple speakers. the diameter of the speakers added horizontally determines this. only the actual speaker size, not how far apart they are in the cabinet, counts. 2x10's side by side don't cover as wide as a 12 or even a 15. 2x12's is even worse. 2x12's vertically is the same as a 1x12. this is the reason so many people stand the 2x12's up. also why 4x12 cabs have such a poor coverage. i will never use one again.
 

louiscyfer

Member
Messages
99
(Sigh) Why do so many TGP members prefer marketing B/S to scientific explanations? Lazy minds prefer comfortable lies to awkward truths?

Note: there is NO beam coming from the centre of a speaker therefore beam blockers cannot change the directionality of any speaker. The loss of treble as you move off axis is caused by all frequencies being radiated by all parts of the cone. As you move off axis there is a different distance to each edge of the speaker and the same frequencies arrive at different times and you get phase cancellations of the shorter wavelengths.

All 12in speaker "beam" the same, all 10in speakers beam the same, as do all 15in speakers... the size of the cone determines the frequency that beaming starts at ... the bigger the cone the lower the frequency that "beams".

ANYTHING you put in front of the speaker is likely to change the TONE of the speaker but solid stuff placed in the centre will make the beam worse as sound waves bend round it. The DIRECTIONALITY will be worse even though you have lost some treble due to the blockers causing phase cancellation issues. IE it's easy to change the tone of a speaker but almost impossible to improve it's directionality (which is the "beam").

Only Jay Mitchell's doughnut design (foam with a hole in the centre) improves directionality but at quite a big loss of top end (tone)... not for folks who like to dime their treble knobs.
well said. i think a lot of people confuse blocking some of the sound coming fro, the speaker from their vantage point with trying to get a more uniform directional coverage. putting something solid front of any part of the speaker will block some of the high end more, so they think they are getting the result they want. the people thinking this can be solved by eq are also in this camp. it is a different issue, not the same as trying to get a better coverage with as little change in sound as possible. and this breakdown in communication is the cause of all the bickering between people on the effectiveness of beam blockers. it would help if they actually talked about the same thing.
 

rockon1

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
13,271
. putting something solid front of any part of the speaker will block some of the high end more
Exactly. If this works for you that's all that matters. For whatever scientific reason it seems to work better on center though.
 




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