I need an adult electric starter kit...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Taylor Daly, Feb 16, 2008.


  1. Taylor Daly

    Taylor Daly Member

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    Ive got a buddy that wants to learn and he has asked me how he can most productively spend $600 to $700 for a starter electric kit. I realized that I have no idea lol. Ive thought maybe a Super Champ XD or GDEC, but really dont know what a good quality electric in the ~$400 range would be.

    Singles or Hums I dont think matters...at least not at the moment. Maybe a used PRS SE or Epiphone LP?

    Thoughts on a good amp-guitar combo?
     
  2. PFCG

    PFCG Member

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    i remember a guitar store back home in ct used to have a nice starter kid with a tech 21 trademark 30 combo and a prs santana se. It was a really good setup to start with.

    Id go for a PRS SE model and a tech 21 amp or maybe a blues junior if youd like
     
  3. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

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    A Squier 51, or almost a Squier anything and a Peavey with at least a 10 inch speaker.


    Oops, add a Bad Monkey.
     
  4. daddyo

    daddyo Guest

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    Guitars-all used: MIM Fender Strat or Tele, PRS SE of any type
    Amps: used Roland Cube 30

    That should set you back $600 which leave $$$ for cables, a tuner, and even a cheap pedal like a Bad Monkey or SD1.
     
  5. straightblues

    straightblues Member

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    I would highly recommend buying used. That way he can sell it if it isn't right for him.

    For a guitar get either a used Fender MIM Strat or tele, or a Epiphone Les Paul or SG. They are very decent and are easily resold if necessary.

    As far as amps go, get him one of the modeling amps. The Roland Cube or Vox Pathfinder amps are pretty good. They have built in effects and amp models and are a perfect way to start.
     
  6. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Blues Junior and a cheap (Squier? Baja or Highway One?) Tele.

    IMHO and YMMV and all that, I think the G-DEC is the most digital sounding amp I've ever heard - I was in a workshop where another guitarist had one, and it was like fingers on a blackboard to me. Something analog and a pedal will do him more good, sez I.

    If you do modeling, I like the Roland xxCubes.
     
  7. yellowecho

    yellowecho Member

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    I'd spend $600 on a good acoustic.
    Once he starts getting better, GAS will take care of the rest.

    If it has to be electric, I'd buy one of those new Gibson Melody Makers and buy an old Vibrochamp! You should be able to get both of those for right about $600. Otherwise, one of those Epiphone valve juniors and a better guitar.
     
  8. RL in Fla

    RL in Fla Member

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    Ibanez AS73 or a Tele , and a Vox V15R .
     
  9. smorgdonkey

    smorgdonkey Member

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    That's great advice. Learn on the acoustic.
     
  10. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Not sure I buy this. If the electric is what's turning him on to get started, he'll just be frustrated by not being able to sound like [Electric Player Name Here]. Electric is an honorable instrument in its own right, not just something you're allowed to graduate to when you paid your acoustic dues.

    I've gotten a couple of adult beginners started on electric and I think they're both happier.
     
  11. smorgdonkey

    smorgdonkey Member

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    That's not what I was getting at. My reasoning is:
    -it is more tolerable practicing especially when you are learning initial finger positions for chords
    -it develops stronger fingers
     
  12. grego7

    grego7 has left the building Gold Supporting Member

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    Baja teles are FANTASTIC guitars. Can't go wrong with that.
     
  13. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Not trying to be adversarial here - I just know that for years I played acoustic when I wanted to sound like Clapton or Duane, and always felt like there was something missing. I really wish I'd started on electric - that's the music I like, and when I finally did go electric, I spent years trying to learn how to produce a decent tone that I could have gotten over years before if I hadn't been playing the wrong instrument. But to each his/her own.
     
  14. mvsr990

    mvsr990 Supporting Member

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    I'm more interested in Dylan and Nick Drake and etc. more than Clapton or Duane myself, but I still think an electric can make a better first guitar in some situations.

    An electric can be essentially silent, using a POD and headphones. If you want to practice late at night, in the wrong apartment/house you could still bother a parent/child/roommate with an acoustic.
     
  15. Groovey Records

    Groovey Records Member

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    Decay,

    We like the same gear so we have some common ground on tone. And + 1 the electric guitar is a instrument distinct and apart from its forebearer the acoustic spanish guitar.

    I feel that tone is in the fingers and the direct route to that path is on an acoustic guitar. I could spell out the grocery list of reasons but I'll only list one.

    An acoustic guitar allows you to get intimate with the connection of heart, hand and sound much faster. Once your there any guitar can take you where you wanna be. It becomes a part of your own presence.

    But your right thats just how I feel to each his own

    Regards
    Groovey Records
     
  16. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    What you guys say has merit - and I would say there's no slam-dunk right answer (even including mine! ;) ). But I'll give one reason on the electric starter side: Not only did I struggle to learn to produce a listenable tone, but I also spent years learning to stop overplaying. Sustain is something that separates electric from acoustic, and learning to play with that instead of playing 1000 notes gets you closer to being the electric player you might want to be from the git go. Or not. I was wrong that other time too! :)
     
  17. devinb

    devinb Member

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    The worst guitar I ever played was an Epiphone SG...I'd look into a used Tribute G&L, you might even be able to get an American G&L and a Valve Jr.
     
  18. 78tsubaki

    78tsubaki Member

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    Melody Maker is what I was thinking too. He will grow into it but not out grow it which is often a problem with no name guit boxes.
     
  19. JUSTJOB

    JUSTJOB Member

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    Ther are actually a lot of options that are doable, and you have had some great recommendations. I will only add that it is imperative that whatever he settles on is set up properly. If you don't have the ability to do this then find someone reputable in the area. It has been my experience that about any fairly decent guitar can be turned into an acceptable player. The tone should come secondary to having a proper setup. Ther is little more discouraging than to try and learn on an improperly setup guitar so keep enough in the budget for one.
    Best Regards!
     
  20. dk123123dk

    dk123123dk Member

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    I agree he should start on electric, not acoustic. I started on acoustic and lasted a few hours before giving up. The problem is its just too damn hard to master at first. However an electric guitar is just flat out easier to play. After a lesson or two you should be able to play a Nirvana song or something simple, and that is what it is all about. Actually playing a song. It makes the player feel like all this hard work and memorizing a lot of new chords/scales/rules/technique is worth the hard effort. Then once you get over that first hump, you will begin to understand its going to take a lot more work, but every time you learn a new trick, its a reward.

    Back to the point... I think a used pro jr, a used mim strat, and a used bad monkey could be had for less than 600 bucks. They would all have room for improvement, or could get most of the investment back should he pack it in.

    The money saved could go towards a used speaker cab, some nos tubes, and some upgraded pickups/hardware. Most tuners are free when you buy a few packs of strings online, so just watch out for a good deal. Might want to learn to tune by ear as well. Really helps develop a good ear, which is key if he ever wants to play with a band.

    Good luck, start searching on Craigslist!

    dk
     

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