I play too many notes

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Motterpaul, Jan 5, 2016.

  1. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    When it comes to sax, Coltrane is the one guy who is pretty impossible to cop. It's too much. But Rollins, Cannonball, Bird, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Johnny Hodges, Gene Ammons, Joe Henderson, Michael Brecker and so many more are inspiration for 20 lifetimes of guitar study.

    :aok :beer
     
  2. Turi

    Turi Member

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    So much truth here!
    In Brian Setzer hot licks DVD he says something like in the moment wanking on one single note might be more fitting and better than any licks you got.. Not word for word, but its something pretty similar he said.

    I think it's totally true - I mean take Lindsey Buckingham for example, dude can play anything and I love his solos - the best ones IMO are the live ones where he seriously just spams one note over and over and over and over.. It's just epic as, sounds awesome and is exactly what the moment is calling for.
    I mean he and the band have already done the hard work building up the tension might as well smash that glory note out as long and hard as possible, right?

    That sorta stuff is what its all about IMO.

    Less "guitarist" more "moment".
     
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  3. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    Lithsp...

    Lindsey is one of the best "minimal" guitarists - like Picasso as opposed to Dali or Jackson Pollack. I agree a lot.
     
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  4. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    Cubist - this is a very good layout of common tones." - I think you should post this as a separate thread under a new title called "Ist position common tones" or something. They could almost make this one post a "sticky
     
  5. splatt

    splatt david torn / splattercell Gold Supporting Member

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    i dunno.
    when it comes to playing music, it seems to me that persistently "clever" is always full of sh*t, no matter which branch it comes from.
     
  6. Turi

    Turi Member

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    Yeah man, I reckon Lindsey is one of the best guitarists full stop.
    He's a monster.
    He can totally go all bajillion notes per second too. He just owns.
     
  7. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    Great idea - I can do this just by watching recordings I already have.
     
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  8. smolder

    smolder Gold Supporting Member

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    I don't know what this means.
     
  9. Powderfinger

    Powderfinger Gold Supporting Member

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    Yeah, listen to players who don't play too many notes. Neil Young, John Fogerty come to mind.
     
  10. Neer

    Neer Supporting Member

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    Listen to yourself. Construct your ideas based on where you hear them going.

    Learn to play the way you want to sound. This works for every kind of music. You have to work harder at it. It begins in the brain, not the fingers.
     
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  11. splatt

    splatt david torn / splattercell Gold Supporting Member

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    i wonder:
    how many notes aren't there, anyway?
     
  12. Bryan T

    Bryan T guitar owner Silver Supporting Member

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    It depends how tasty the player is. For the tastiest? All of them.
     
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  13. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    People always say this, I just don't agree at all. I think Coltrane displayed an exceptional amount of restraint and discipline, especially in his great post-1960 work all the way up to the end. Even the Giant Steps/"Sheets of Sound" period that came right before - on Giant Steps you hear him painstakingly working out permutations of the same motives, over and over, it's not just mindless blowing - it's incredibly restrained and controlled

    And I think his sense of time was sublime and completely personal...but maybe that's just me
     
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  14. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    I don't know that I agree with that either ;)

    When I was in my heavy transcribing days I learned every note he played on "Too Young To Go Steady" and it was a major revelation, probably one of the greatest lessons I've ever had
     
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  15. IGuitUpIGuitDown

    IGuitUpIGuitDown Member

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    My best solos just HAPPENED out of nowhere.
    A glimpse of what could be in a sea of impossibilities.
    Now this may occur by consciously composing a solo for an original song, or just closing my eyes and going for it. But I find with practically all guitarists that sometimes they ARE NOT going to solo as well as they can - every single time that they pick up the guitar.

    We guitarists idolize and worship other guitarists for their successes. Not their failures, or at least their captured output that wasn't as good as the famous cuts...and that's perfectly fine. It is who we are.

    Fripp's one note only solo at the end of "Starless" is one of my favorite guitar bits ever written. He creates an unbearable amount of tension by just slowly climbing up the neck until the world ends. A perfect example of what a solo is, isn't, and doesn't have to be.

    Just as magic occurs more frequently with the right band.
    It does not always occur every time that we pick up a guitar, ANY guitar.
    Let go.
    Record any song WITHOUT you playing the solo with the band.
    Then you have a template to throw a billion colors at.
    Start throwing.
    :aok
     
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  16. JonR

    JonR Member

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    I'm sure you're right. You've listened to him a lot more than I have! I did transcribe one of his solos of his once (All Blues - before the period you're talking about), and it seemed aimless to me. It was certainly clever, but - just speaking personally - there were way too many ideas jostling for space.
    A friend of mine (pro UK sax player and composer) once showed me a transcription of a Coltrane solo he'd just done, all 7 pages of it - and laughed and shrugged as if (in the end) it was all a hopeless waste of time; and he was a big Trane fan. (He didn't mean it was a rubbish solo, only that writing it all out like that - he felt - was missing the point.)
    But the main thing that put me off Coltrane (esp the later period) was not so much the speed he played at that put me off, but his tone. I couldn't get past that.
    That's definitely just me ;).
     
  17. T Dizz

    T Dizz Member

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    sometimes I like to see what I can do just using 1 string or 3 notes..etc.
     
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  18. Neer

    Neer Supporting Member

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    Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but really? His tone was and is one of the most beautiful things I've ever heard. Recognizable and distinguishable in a sea of 1,000 voices.
     
  19. fezz parka

    fezz parka Member

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    +747 to what Flyin' Brian said. Play when you exhale. Pause when you inhale.

    This talkbox thang I did really brought the breathing thing home, because since I was recording the sounds coming out of my mouth, I didn't want big gasps picked up if I did a long widdly woo run. Short simple phrases so I could literally breathe!

     
  20. Neer

    Neer Supporting Member

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    The truth is, I never had the experience of listening to Coltrane's tone in person, as I was only a child when he died, but the recorded facsimile of his 'voice' enables comparison to other recordings of other voices.

    Paul Bley said that when he played with Lester Young, Young had the bell of his horn only about a foot away from him. He said, "here was a sound taht had nothing to do with any other sound I'd ever heard on a horn. It was totally unlike the recorded sound, because of course 'high fidelity' is a misnomer. High fidelity is merely a paper cone vibrating. This was high fidelity and everything else was no fidelity at all. It was incredibly gorgeous and expressive...."

    I have to believe the same was true of Coltrane, whose influence has extended for decades as the benchmark of excellence in every way, all tastes aside.
     

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