I sleep three hours a night.

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Mike Duncan, Apr 6, 2017.

  1. Totally Bored

    Totally Bored Member

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    I can’t sleep either. Been like that for years so I finally did a sleep study and I have severe Sleep apnea.

    I’m now doing Auto CPAP. Only 4 nights so far. I hope it works. I feel a little better but I’m not sleeping thru the night ... yet.
     
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  2. 02Singlecut

    02Singlecut Supporting Member

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    A shot of whiskey....and get laid!!!! :p:p:p:p:p
     
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  3. stumphead

    stumphead Member

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    I will bet that for many not having the room pitch black is the culprit
    for those who are up pissing all night - you should check your blood sugar levels as you could have diabetes developing particularly if one of you parents had it , you are over weight or drink soda or eat foods with insane sugar levels
     
  4. phoenix 7

    phoenix 7 Member

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    As others have suggested, I'd check into the possibility that it's sleep apnea.
     
  5. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Member

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    When I hit middle age I discovered I had become hypersensitive to caffeine. Not that it hits me especially strongly, but I metabolize it unusually slowly. If I drink a Coke or an iced tea in the afternoon, I can't sleep until about six the next morning. Coffee is out of the question. So I switched to decaf tea, and still don't drink it late in the day.

    I also need to get up twice during the night to take meds which need to be taken on an empty stomach and can't be taken together. This sometimes leads to difficulty falling back asleep.

    Two Benadryl and a stiff drink work like a charm for me when I can't sleep and absolutely need to. I never did this very often and having learned of the possible link to dementia I'm glad I didn't, but it's still a fallback option for once in a while. Works every time; I think of it as the Nyquil effect.

    My Dad (who's an MD) turned me on to a natural over-the-counter sleep aid called MidNite. It doesn't knock you out and it doesn't leave you dopey in the morning. In fact I'm not certain it actually helps me fall asleep any faster. But where it does help is getting back to sleep after being up during the night. I take it an average of two or three times a week.

    I agree melatonin can be very helpful, especially if the room isn't perfectly dark. The thing about melatonin is, it doesn't last long because it gets broken down very quickly. There are now time-release melatonin caps which give you a fast dose and then a trickle dosage for a number of hours after. These have been far more effective for me than regular melatonin was. Not something for every night, because you can develop a tolerance. But a good option for a couple of times a week.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
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  6. Trevordog

    Trevordog Member

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    Melintolin= Melatonin?
     
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  7. pokey

    pokey Member

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    Three doesn't seem like enough, but who am I to say?
    I sleep 5-6 hrs a night, and I don't think that's enough. But if I lay around in bed for too long my body starts to hurt. Life is strange.
     
  8. DCross

    DCross Supporting Member

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    I sleep from about 11-3 usually, then on and off til about 5, when I get up for the day. Sex before bed is a great sleep aid, I find... so when I have a woman in my life, I sleep great.

    CPAP is great for some, but I do believe it is very over-prescribed. In my case I felt very much like I was being scammed - they were telling me how to buy it before they did the sleep study (I didn't go for it).
     
  9. mdog114

    mdog114 Member

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    I sleep around 4-5 hours a night.

    I get a lot done.
     
  10. JDJ

    JDJ Member

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    Necro thread, but... I quit caffeine and take 5 mg of melatonin each night. My job has me on call 24/7/365 and the stress is a way of life. If I wake up I start to think about it.

    But the melatonin has been helping. I’m 49.

    Best wishes to all who suffer this!
     
  11. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Member

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    Used to be 4-5 hrs a night was my norm. Over the last few years, that's gone up to seven. I don't care for it because it seems like wasted time, but I do enjoy feeling more refreshed. I can still grab three hours and be pretty functional, but it's harder now than it was when I was in the service and doing weird sleeping stuff to accommodate overnight flightline stand-bys or deployment issues. I could do three days running without much ado when I was younger. Now, not so much.

    If you're only sleeping three hours a night you should seek medical attention, including mental-health. Disturbed sleep schedules can be a sign not only of physiological issues, but also depression.

    Limit your naps after an overnight to a few hours. Your body will want more sleep, so you'll get there earlier without stocking up on it during the day, and generally I find night-sleep more restful, myself.

    Right now we're shorthanded at work so I'm covering one or two overnights (11pm - 7am). I told my boss I'm fine with that so long as the overnights are at the end of my workweek and I have three days to reset my body-clock. I can do it on two days rest but I sure don't like it.

    Long story short, after an overnight, don't let yourself catch up completely, just get enough to be functional, go to bed earlier than you usually would, and reset your body clock that way.
     
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  12. tnvol

    tnvol Ufologist Silver Supporting Member

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    Perhaps you should spend some time getting to know your body better before you go to sleep. Works for me.
     
  13. Jay K

    Jay K Member

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    One of the symptoms of sleep apnea, at least for some who have it, is having to piss a lot during the night. Although my blood sugar level was normal, I was up four or five times a night to go to the bathroom until I started using a CPAP. Now it is once a night. But it is also important to periodically monitor one's blood sugar levels as diabetes is a major health problem these days.

    Did you have the sleep study, and, if so, how did it turn out? There are a number of indicators that one might have sleep apnea, and if these all line up a doctor can be pretty sure one has it, and can then use the sleep study for confirmation. For example, if one is male, overweight, and has a neck circumference of 17 inches or more, there is a pretty good chance one has sleep apnea, particularly if that person has some symptoms of the disease. OTOH, even those who are not overweight and have a neck circumference of less than 17 inches should have a sleep test if one exhibits some of the symptoms (e.g., me).

    As to CPAPs being over-prescribed, I don't think there is any evidence to support this. The scientifically-derived criteria for prescribing CPAP therapy are quite clear and are based largely on the results of a sleep study, and it would be rather risky for a doctor or sleep lab to deviate from them by prescribing CPAPs to those who do not need them.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
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  14. beckstriad

    beckstriad I'm frosting a cake with a paper knife Gold Supporting Member

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    Yep. The doctor also really has no incentive to over-prescribe them.
     
  15. althekiller

    althekiller Member

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    Thanks for the tips! It’s been awhile since that post and now I work straight nights at a new hospital. (I couldn’t turn down the extra money I get for night shift)...anyway, I work my three 12s in a row and have four days off. After my last shift I do exactly what you describe and limit my sleep after work. Say from like 0900-1200 or 1300. Then I’m able to go to sleep by 2100/2200 at night and wake up the next morning around 0700 without having to even set and alarm.

    I actually like this better than any sleep pattern I’ve had in my life because for my four days off, once I force myself to not sleep all day long after my last shift my sleep cycle seems to naturally reset and on the off days I go to bed earlier in the pm and wake up earlier in the am and feel rested.
     
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  16. Jay K

    Jay K Member

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    There is no evidence they are over-prescribed. Indeed, many, if not most, health insurance companies require a sleep test showing sleep apnea before they will pay for a CPAP machine.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
  17. aynirar27

    aynirar27 All You Need Is Rock and Roll Gold Supporting Member

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    Jimmy Legs?
     
  18. Jon C

    Jon C Silver Supporting Member

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    Doesn’t sound quite right, please take care and get checked out. :cool:
     
  19. Totally Bored

    Totally Bored Member

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    Agreed

    When people say it’s over prescribed I question that statement. If you get a study and a medical person is talking about you using CPAP before the study, maybe they read the questionnaire you filled out before the study that suggests your overweight, you snore or you get up often at night and or you have a headache when you wake up in the morning. These are some of the symptoms of sleep apnea.

    I worked for a home care company and I trained people how to use the CPAP BiPap machines and everybody had to have a sleep study and nobody had a AHI level below 5.

    AHI = apnea hypopnea index
    0-5 = normal
    5-15 = mild
    15-30 = moderate
    30 or greater = severe

    Insurance company’s don’t want to give you $1000 machines and $200 masks and supplys every 6 months if your test is normal. Fahgettaboutit :bonk
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
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  20. runningman

    runningman Member

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    This

    Actually, edibles are even better. Just need to time it right.
     

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