"I think Brubeck and Desmond have gone just as far with dissonance as I care to go."

Ferret

Silver Supporting Member
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1,903
I played this clip for my wife who remarked: 'The other actors don't look like they know what the hell they're talking about either.'
 

taez555

Member
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8,333
"Cut! Great job Elvis, I think we got it in that take. Everyone else take five while we set up the next shot."
 

Mark Robinson

Platinum Supporting Member
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8,787
Apparently the decision was not up to Brubeck, Desmond or even Elvis. Neat little slice of pop culture "history". A hilarious footnote I suppose.
 

Ogre

Member
Messages
4,654
Loved this since the first time I saw it, back when it was freash. Love Brubeck & Desmond too.
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,677
Brubeck was a serious composer, studied with Darius Milhaud, who was one of the great fathers of polytonality. Also, Brubeck could not read music.
There was plenty of dissonance in his music. If you are only familiar with Take Five and In Your Own Sweet way, that might come as a surprise.
 

GerryJ

Member
Messages
5,172
Soon to be released: "Elvis: the Lost Cecil Taylor Sessions."

Well, at least we know the screenwriter was a definite jazz fan.
I always loved that phase (mid 50s-70s), where jazz fans (and full fledged adults!) would get worked up about someone and cry out "He's gone too far!!" I miss that kind of passion about jazz, don't see it these days.
 

urizen

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,907
Funny clip--- and Elvis does an excellent job of looking either stupefied (or simply stupid) ... he makes it look natural.
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,677
Lennie Tristano! Famous jazz dude better known to modern players as Joe Satriani's teacher.

Satch took some lessons with Lennie, but I don't think there was much of a connection there.

Lennie recorded the first free jazz record ever, Intuition, where there was no prior discussion, no theme or harmony, except for the order which each player would enter (Konitz, Marsh, Bauer, Fishkin). That was late 40s and probably what those turkeys were talking about, just a decade late.
 

GerryJ

Member
Messages
5,172
Satch took some lessons with Lennie, but I don't think there was much of a connection there.
I remember an album, a duet with Tristano and Konitz. It wasn't atonal, just incredibly convoluted single note hyper-bebop type riffs, kind of Paganini-like, super-human zillion note stuff.

Satch mentioned what it was like to study with Tristano, approximately this: "You couldn't play a wrong note. You could take all the time in the world to find and play the next note -even 2-3 minutes - but if you played the wrong note, he'd close the piano lid and the lesson was over. And I had more than a few very short lessons (laughs)."
 






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