i wonder if Gibson was this controversial in the 1940s

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Help!I'maRock!, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. Help!I'maRock!

    Help!I'maRock! Member

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    the 1940s saw Gibson introduce the laminate archtop. while partly a cost cutting measure, it was an attempt to reduce feedback at the ever increasing volumes guitarists were playing at. laminate construction drastically changed the sound of the guitar. no longer would it really have much of an unplugged, acoustic voice. the guitar became a truly electric instrument.

    given the controversial (and heated) talk on guitar forums regarding alternative materials and processes, regardless of how the company got to them, it seems like the same moment in time.
     
  2. b2sc

    b2sc Member

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    Yeah, but back then everyone bitched about it via their telegraph machines...
     
  3. RedTiger

    RedTiger Member

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    I'm guessing people didn't really know or understand the differences or were like "Hey! I can play my electric guitar louder without that annoying feedback! That's great!". People once upon a time weren't so cynical about new features.
     
  4. patentcad

    patentcad Member

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    I guess in the 1940's they didn't have TGP, just AOL.
     
  5. dodona

    dodona Member

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    was Gibson really the first to introduce the laminate archtop?
     
  6. Help!I'maRock!

    Help!I'maRock! Member

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    everything i've been reading about the laminate archtop recently says yes, but i could be wrong. Gibson certainly wasn't the first to use laminates though. those can be traced back at least to the 1830s in guitar making, if not further.
     
  7. L_Totti

    L_Totti Member

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    People in the 40's were looking to the future. Now we just look to the past.
     
  8. supa-fuzz

    supa-fuzz Member

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    Yep, this hits nail on the head
     
  9. nmiller

    nmiller Drowning in lap steels Silver Supporting Member

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    Several manufacturers introduced laminated electric archtops in the '30s. Vega actually advertized theirs as "non-crackable", though they also made this claim about some of their carved guitars as well.
     
  10. patentcad

    patentcad Member

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    Don't be pissing on tube amp technology and relic guitars, the fuel that sloshes around the high end guitar industry gas tank.
     
  11. zombywoof

    zombywoof Member

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    Nope. At the very least, in terms of mass produced guitars, Stromberg-Voisinet (later Kay) started making archtops with laminate back and sides before 1925. They believed that the use of laminate was not only advanced but made the guitars stronger.
     
  12. Faded

    Faded Member

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  13. SPROING!

    SPROING! Member

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    My uncle began playing in 43. He tells me that they were so glad to get plugged in at all that nothing else mattered much. Electrics were loud and that's what they were after.
     
  14. Tycho

    Tycho Member

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    I think people in the first half of the '40s had other things to think about. Even guitarists.
     
  15. Help!I'maRock!

    Help!I'maRock! Member

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    Gibson wasn't really making guitars then either.
     
  16. paulg

    paulg Supporting Member

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    just like today, I bet there was an element that balked at laminated tops. Supposedly, the rank and file workers at Gibson were not happy about making Les Paul's. Blasmephy!
     
  17. mc5nrg

    mc5nrg Supporting Member

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    mostly war production at the time, not musical instruments.
     
  18. cardamonfrost

    cardamonfrost Member

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    Anyone who played a 175 probably wasnt complaining.
     
  19. supa-fuzz

    supa-fuzz Member

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    From 1942-45 Gibson was a wartime sub-contractor, they still made electrics and acoustics during these 3 years, last time I checked, the 1940's were 10 years long
     
  20. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    I think, as already mentioned, guitarists were sooooooo ready for the electric guitar that the change in technology was universally embraced...except for a purist minority that decried the coming electricness as the apocalypse (similar to how I might sound in a discussion of oak Martins!). Change will always be resisted by some.


    It's worth pointing out that when Gibson was introducing their ES models, the carved, solid wood models were still selling strong (some with the "McCarty Finger-rest" p.u. attachment). In the early fifties, they also introduced electrified versions of the solid-wood L-5 and Super 400 to meet the purists half-way. Gibson has historically always maintained a "something for everyone" line of product.
     

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