I wonder what will happen to live music with my generation..

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by cantstoplt021, Feb 11, 2015.

  1. cantstoplt021

    cantstoplt021 Member

    Messages:
    1,187
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    (once the older folks are gone). Maybe it's just where I'm at, but a lot of kids my age (20) don't seem to care about live music at a local or regional level. Sure some will go see the big name acts when they come through, but for a lot of kids they'd rather go to a basement and listen to music from an ipod then go out and see good live music. An exception being electronic music of course. I really do wonder what the future of live music will be. I know from talking to my parents and friend's parents that live music was HUGE when they were younger. Every weekend people would go out and see good local bands and there were many places to play. That's just what they did for fun. But it doesn't seem that important to people my age. I could however be wrong and maybe I just need to get out to more music venues on the weekends? In fact I know I do cause if I go to one more damp dark stuffy basement with an iPod blaring I'll lose my mind. Maybe why I stay in most weekends...

    Anyway do you younger guys on here have good experiences with our generation and live music?
     
  2. GuitarGuy66

    GuitarGuy66 Member

    Messages:
    6,834
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2014
    I do sound quite a bit in our town. Lots of original bands. Kids in their 20's making music, playing gigs.
     
  3. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,556
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Arrrstin
    A lot of things have been invented which make leaving the house less and less necessary...streaming concerts, instant downloads, etc.

    Not to mention massive increases in ticket prices and the logistical issues of going to shows....it's just too easy to be lazy these days.

    My 21 year old sister-in-law only really seems to care about festivals or any touring band who's playing but probably in the festival, too...
     
  4. LoopyBullet

    LoopyBullet Supporting Member

    Messages:
    959
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    I'm 25, and I've thought about this too. Something interesting about our generation is that we have the internet as we grow into our 20s. We also have an almost limitless amount of music at our fingertips.

    I fall into the category of being very used to having a seemingly infinite amount of music at my disposal...that I can access in seconds. I'll listen to bands from the 70s, 60s, 50s, jazz from the 40s and 30s, bluegrass from a show taped a month ago, countless live shows that I'd love to attend in person but don't pass through my town. There's so much music for me to access that I feel like that facet of my life has "taken over" the spot of exploring new music live.

    I love watching live music because it's so much more involved. However, due to how fast my life is right now, I choose to spend 30 minutes of my time searching and finding music that I like online instead of 2 hours going to a place and maybe watching something that I like...or maybe finding something that I love.

    It's a bit sad because GOING to listen to music is an experience all in itself. However, finding music through alternate means is more convenient. Also, I think I'm a bit uneducated in WHERE good music exists in the city that I live in. It seems like all I hear in venues is acoustic YouTubey duos doing covers, Top 40 guys catering to hotel guests, and generic khaki shorts blues-rock. I haven't searched for where the good music is in this city because I'm used to finding so much of it by delving into the past through a computer screen.

    A little sad. Convenient. But I do feel that I get a good deal of exposure to good music, even if it's NOTHING like seeing it live. It's different and has its positives, as well as some big negatives. Once I get done with school, I think I'll be much more apt to go out and find some of that music I've been missing and play more myself. :)
     
  5. Ben S.

    Ben S. Member

    Messages:
    2,109
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Location:
    Central New York
    It's gonna suck. :shskesfist
     
  6. americananalog

    americananalog Member

    Messages:
    4,621
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    Location:
    The Mid-West
    Seeing good independent live bands is like a party.
    You're hanging out with the wrong people. Where are you going to school ("then" and "than" are not interchangeable BTW)? College towns are usually hotbeds of independent live music. If you're too young to drink, the art kids know where the house shows are happening.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  7. Belmont

    Belmont Member

    Messages:
    3,470
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver B.C.
    you should come and check my band out, we're called "Yelling at Cloudz",
    we play all Joe Bonamassa and John Mayer covers, it's a blast.
     
  8. VaughnC

    VaughnC Supporting Member

    Messages:
    15,448
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ahh, the days of dropping the needle on a 45rpm record 542 times to pick apart & learn the new top 40 songs. You guys have it too easy ;).
     
  9. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    13,394
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Location:
    AIRY ZONY
    I am 59. There are so many things different about society and the way things are done in any medium. Yes there are other things like computers, video games, fast access to facts. Guitars play and sound better than ever. ANd remember, if you are a player, you look at the music world much different than say a poly Sci student who just likes music. Your world is much more complicated playing an instrument. So today more than ever, music has stiff competition. And for the most part, it has a lack of anything really new. No music worthy stars coming out with something that is different and new. Not replicated form the past. SO you have this new world and you are expecting music to be a main component of it. Well, for most, its background. Its back round music for the background. And really Rock music and most other genre's are exhausted. There's no new style of instrumentalists. and there's few music that is not predictable. SO how could it possibly be interesting to anyone the degree it is to a musician. And since the the music industry have been gutted by the way they do business. And with music just about free. There must be something new on the horizon. It might take the place of music or combo-d with it. What do young people do to relax without drugs and alcohol these days? Not everyone is hiking or thinks it is relaxing. Perhaps we are in a lull before the next big storm. Whatever that will be!
     
  10. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    13,394
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Location:
    AIRY ZONY
    And if I did not answer the question. There is a lot less convenience in listeneing to live music. It use to be something everyone was interested in from the 70-80's on back. But with stiffer liquor laws, political polarization,free music access and the other issues I mentioned in the above post, live music has it rough. And then people talk over the live music as if it was just the radio. There's much less respect for musicians.
     
  11. Rod

    Rod Tone is Paramount Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    16,619
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Location:
    Santa Fe New Mexico/Kittery Maine
    I'm older now... Our band is very popular but we play older classic rock and bluesRock tunes.. Black Crowes and STP are current music for us! They are a number of 20 something venues back here that mostly have original bands playing at... It's not dead here...
    The folkies and bluegrass musicians are always busy as well.. And the jazzers
     
  12. bluesjunior

    bluesjunior Member

    Messages:
    5,618
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2008
    There's been live music since the first caveman learned to whistle and bang two stones together rhythmically and I can't see the fact that modern pop is so done to death that people can't earn a crumb from it ever changing that. As long as people keep learning to play instruments there will be people willing to listen to them but only a few will ever make a living at it and that's as it should be.
     
  13. fenderlead

    fenderlead Member

    Messages:
    3,669
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    I'll agree that there isn't much new around and something like the Rock and Roll explosion that happened in the 1950s just isn't going to happen again, but there are John Mayer's and whoever that are not doing anything new and yet have large younger audiences and that's the key, because younger generations are newbies and old tricks ain't old to them when presented by younger artists.

    Clubbing and Electro and DJ's are going on, if someone considers that to be live music.
     
  14. cantstoplt021

    cantstoplt021 Member

    Messages:
    1,187
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    I'll agree that I hang out with people that aren't into music nearly as much as I am. A few weeks ago I did go out to see a local college band and the place was packed. It gave me some hope. Trying to get my friends to leave a ****** apartment to go though.... haha that was difficult and I almost went by myself. That's another story though. I'm in Burlington, Vermont which isn't a bad music town I don't think. I know it used to be a lot better though.

    I think a big problem is my generation grew up with some terrible popular music. The older generations had jazz, blues and rock as their popular music. A lot of it had substance and was worth something. Hell Jimi Hendrix and the Beatles were pop musicians. Not to sound pretentious, but we grew up with some worthless stuff. I listen back on the things I used to listen to and its really sad what my generations popular music was/is. Sure there's some good stuff in there, but most of it is **** IMO.

    Another thing is we never bought music. That's something we never did. We downloaded through limewire or listened through youtube and that was that. It never seemed wrong because that's how it was done right? Sure you might get a 10 dollar iTunes gift card and buy a couple songs, but no one was buying albums or anything like that. Music was just this free thing.

    I think these two factors have diminished the respect for music that my generation has. It's become something for the background or something to get drunk to. It's not worth anything other than background music at parties or clubs. No wonder electronic music is so big with my generation. Not that there isn't great stuff out there, but the stuff that appeals to the lowest common denominator isn't worth much musically.

    And no I don't consider a DJ playing music from his laptop live music. If you make the music then that's different. If you play the hottest new songs from your laptop you're not a musician and you make me sick.....
     
  15. fenderlead

    fenderlead Member

    Messages:
    3,669
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    My nephew is 15 and he plays guitar and bass and uke and he plays bass in the school band and he knows how to play Stairway To Heaven and of course more modern things.

    I'm not teaching him anything, and he does it all himself and he doesn't really need my help but I did give him a guitar.
     
  16. gigs

    gigs Member

    Messages:
    10,148
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Location:
    Pittsburgh - aka SIX-burgh
    Live music will never die. It's just different than it was 20 years ago. Just as it's different than it was 2000 years ago. Change happens, keep up.
     
  17. n9ne

    n9ne Member

    Messages:
    1,651
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Location:
    Chattanooga TN
    Up until the late 1990's, there were really only three ways for people to hear the music they liked: listening to the radio, buying records/tapes/CDs of the artists they liked, or going to see live music. Live music played a prominent role in many peoples' lives, simply because there weren't that many other options.

    Over the past 20 years, technology has made music much more accessible overall, which has resulted in an enormous cultural shift. People now have a virtually unlimited library of music at their fingertips 24/7, and it literally fits in their pocket. They can hear exactly what they want, whenever they want it, without having to filter through songs they don't like or that aren't familiar to them.

    As a result of this technology, radio plays a far less important role in society. Retail music sales (i.e. CDs/tapes/records) have dropped off the map almost entirely, and where live music used to be a driving force in entertainment culture, it has been increasingly relegated to something of a niche market, supported primarily by fans who are specifically interested in seeking out live music.

    There will always be some demand for live music, and there will always be venues for those who are interested in it. But the unfortunate truth is, the live music scene as a whole has become a shadow of what it once was, and live music venues and events are becoming fewer in number. Live music's day in the sun has passed, and I doubt it will ever again be a driving force in pop culture.
     
  18. custom53

    custom53 Member

    Messages:
    4,763
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Location:
    Columbus
    You sound pretty wise for a young age. I have wondered the same thing. And you correct, music was huge for my generation. I don't see that anywhere now.
     
  19. fenderlead

    fenderlead Member

    Messages:
    3,669
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    What sort of music?

    Blues/Rock is still around via John Mayer and Jack White and Joe Bonamassa etc.

    EDM is still going pretty strong as is modern R&B and pop and rap/hiphop and modern country.

    Streamers are streaming the pop acts in the millions etc etc.

    The top stream on Spotify at the moment has over 15 million streams.

    John Mayer and Jack White and Joe Bonamassa and Katy Perry and Taylor Swift tour live as do many others.

    Metal bands play live, maybe to small audiences if they are not well known but they do play live.

    There are even some Jazz venues left and Allan Holdsworth still tours.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  20. custom53

    custom53 Member

    Messages:
    4,763
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Location:
    Columbus
    From how I read the Op's statement, he is talking about local music. When I was younger there were great bands and great clubs all over town. It was part of our lifestyle. I don't see that anymore.
     

Share This Page