iconic chord ?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by candid_x, Aug 2, 2019.

  1. Thesleepstalker

    Thesleepstalker Member

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    OK. Let's compromise. Google: "Suspended Chord" and post the wiki definition here.

    I think that's simple enough. Could you do that for us? Thanks again!
     
  2. GuitarMakerNyc

    GuitarMakerNyc Member

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    I've already quoted from the Sus Wiki page that proves my point (you guys are just not reading the entire wiki entry). Although there are better resources that agree with my point. Besides it's not about compromise...
     
  3. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    F9/11 (assuming F is the root.)
     
  4. NorCal_Val

    NorCal_Val Member

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    I really like those first two albums.
     
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  5. BenF

    BenF Silver Supporting Member

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    I don't know what kind of sessions you do, but you sound like a professional.

    Imagine this scenario (indulge me): you're in a professional recording session for a major label rock artist. Not a conservatory trained artist but a self-taught artist - they can't read or write music but they know enough to write out a few chords. You see that one part of the chord progression is written out as G to Dus4 and back to G.

    What are you going to play over the Dsus4? Would you include an F# in the chord because it's common knowledge that the 3rd and 4th can occur the same chord?

    I'm not saying you can't play the F#, but would it be appropriate in this context?

    In my case, I would NOT play the following chord if I saw Dsus4 as one of the chord in this context. It's a lovely chord, one I use, but not appropriate in this situation

    5 (A)
    3 (D)
    0 (G)
    4 (F#)
    5 (D)
    X
     
  6. big mike

    big mike David Grissom Wannabee Gold Supporting Member

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    OK we have two members not allowed to post in this thread for bickering.
    If it restarts elsewhere, warnings and suspensions will be issued.

    Be civil, disagree in an appropriate manner.
     
  7. BenF

    BenF Silver Supporting Member

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    Hold on there, I never said a chord can't have a 3rd and a 4th. They can. I gave an example of one in an earlier post. This is all about what the chord is named.

    Assuming that F is the root and that the player would just be going by the chord symbol and wouldn’t have the chord written out, I’d probably use either: F9add4 or F9add11 but I'd lean more towards F9add4.

    I’d write it that way for the sake of clarity. I would not name it a sus chord -- too much room for confusion as far as I'm concerned. They may NOT play the 3rd when i want them to (again, coming back to common knowledge: I'd worry that if they see "sus" in the chord name that they would not play the third, when there is definitely a third in the chord.)

    I look forward to finding out how you would name F Bb Eb G A

    Since we’re throwing Wiki links around, I'll add this to the mix: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_names_and_symbols_(popular_music)#11ths

    Excerpts:

    "These are theoretically 9th chords with the 11th (4th) note in the scale added. However, it is common to leave certain notes out. The major 3rd is often omitted because of a strong dissonance with the 11th (4th), therefore called an avoid note. Omission of the 3rd reduces an 11th chord to the corresponding 9sus4 (suspended 9th chord; Aikin 2004, p. 104). Similarly, omission of the 3rd as well as 5th in C11 results in a major chord with alternate base B♭/C, which is characteristic in soul and gospel music. ..:"

    “…If the 9th is omitted, the chord is no longer an extended chord, but an added tone chord (see below). Without the 3rd, this added tone chord becomes a 7sus4 (suspended 7th chord). For instance: C11 without 9th = C7add11 = C–E–G–B♭–(D)–F”
     
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  8. phoenix 7

    phoenix 7 Member

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    Disbelief
     
  9. Hackdog69

    Hackdog69 Silver Supporting Member

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    Finally, thank you...
     
  10. big mike

    big mike David Grissom Wannabee Gold Supporting Member

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    Report things please
    Moderators don’t patrol the forums
     

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