Ideal weight for Strat

Songman

Member
Messages
1,851
What is the ideal weight for a strat type of guitar in your opinion?

How about ones with Ash body?
Alder body?
etc?
 

aman74

Silver Supporting Member
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9,051
There's no hard and fast rule.

It's just like when people tell you it needs to sound good acoutically. It's not always so.
 

dalandan

Member
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632
There's no hard and fast rule.

It's just like when people tell you it needs to sound good acoustically. It's not always so.
but most of the time it is. at least for the kind of sound i like. the pickups should be good enough to get the acoustic sound of the guitar. a loud guitar unplugged with good pups = yummy. :drink

anyway, for strats, i like them feather light. as light as you can get em.
 

K-Line

Vendor
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8,382
7.385860486879493736 lb
Man, I thought you had it until I realized that it is 7.38560486879493739 lbs. Wow, that was the closest I have seen anyone get to the right answer. I think this thread will again prove that there is no ideal weight. Check my signature at the bottom for a quote from a fellow TGPer that pretty much sums it up!
 

Ahess86

Member
Messages
330
I like alder strats between 7.5 and 8 lbs. I like ash strats between 8 and 8.5 pounds. I think it all depends on what you're trying to get out of it.
 

Stratobuc

Member
Messages
15,921
Chris, my guitar just arrived, all I have to do is go pick it up. Can't wait to see if its "the perfect weight".... I'm pretty sure it is.


.....Yep, my new K-line is the perfect weight. :aok
 
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robertkoa

Member
Messages
4,187
I think Shane's answer is ridiculous- once you get to 1/780,000 of a pound increments the weight difference is inaudible.......
 

fjs1962

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,462
I never think too much about weight as I think it's more about how the entire guitar comes together than any particular weight. I've had great sounding heavy guitars and crappy light ones and vice-versa. I just went through comparing two PRSs that were pretty much identical spec-wise, one sounded great and one just didn't have "it". Now all that said...

My two "keeper" Strats (after probably 30 or so over the years) are both alder, one maple neck and one RW, and interestingly they both weigh exactly the same thing, 7lb 11 oz. Personally I think it's just a coincidence.....
 

aman74

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,051
but most of the time it is. at least for the kind of sound i like. the pickups should be good enough to get the acoustic sound of the guitar. a loud guitar unplugged with good pups = yummy. :drink

anyway, for strats, i like them feather light. as light as you can get em.
Actually, if the goal is for the soundboard (pickups and bridge) to receive more of the string vibration we would actually want the guitar to be quieter. It would be losing less energy to amplification.

I'm no expert, but I've seen this mentioned before and it makes more sense to me than the generally accepted rule of louder is better. In my opinion that may just be another one of the many myths that get perpetuated continually without any real scrutiny.

I have no proof and one may be right and the other wrong or somewhere in-between. That's not the point though. What's troublesome is the way all the snake-oil and voodoo, mojo, etc... get's engraned in the guitarist culture with no basis in fact.

I know I know...nobody really cares and it isn't going to change.
 

fritferret

Member
Messages
2,964
i would say that weight doesn't matter. i've had great strats with wildly different weights, but made from the same woods. my advice would be to play as many as possible. the same goes for lps. some people are only interested in the light ones, because they think those resonate better and sound better, but other folks like the heavier ones for the same reasons. and if it's a fact that light woods resonate best, then i would say great guitar tone isn't simply due to wood resonance.
 

fjs1962

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,462
While we're on the subject of resonance, let me add that just being "resonant" isn't everything. The frequency of that resonance is important too. I've owned/played guitars that were very resonant in higher fequencies and sounded too twangy to me. Personally I like to hear a deep, full resonant tone acoustically.

You can also have a guitar that is so resonant on certain notes that the overtones kill the fundamental tone and keep that note from sustaining, making a "dead spot". About half of the 22 fret PRS guitars I pick up have some of that going on with the A note at the 10th fret of the B string and 14th fret of the G string. The old short heel 24 fret PRSs are bad about this on the G note 2 frets down.

So when I hear someone say a guitar is "very resonant" I always think, Yeah, but is it resonant in a good way? :)
 

gulliver

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,377
I don't know, IMHO ... I think heavy guitars have faster attack and longer, more even sustain, but I prefer a rounder envelope and a faster sustain drop. But ... my experience is based mostly on bridge pickups. Now, I'm trying different neck pickups in three strats ... heavy, medium and light, and need to see if the neck pickup, being more dynamic and rounded by nature, is a better fit for a heavier guitar.
 






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