If it's true about violins...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by mojocaster.com, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. mojocaster.com

    mojocaster.com Member

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    ... does it also apply to guitars?

     
  2. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    Interesting. One thing that's been crazy is the enormous amount of broken bats in baseball. The bats are breaking left and right, compared to years of the past, and it's never happened this much, not even close. Matter of time before someone is seriously injured.

    bats used are mostly ash or maple. Prime guitar woods! So something sure could be different about the woods.
     
  3. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Supporting Member

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    steroids*
     
  4. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    My first thought, too.
     
  5. Traps

    Traps Member

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    bats - steroids.
     
  6. MOP76

    MOP76 Member

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    Don't think Antonio Stradivari and Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesu put pickups in their violins.

    Bigger guys and faster pitches = steriods

    Bats are also lighter, therefore

    Steriods + lighter bats = Broken bats (x the speed of light squared) Just thought I'd through that in.
     
  7. padavis

    padavis Supporting Member

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    This is something that intrigues me a bit. When they say the treatment of wood do they mean fertilizers and growth helping procedures? Also, where are modern builders getting their wood? I asked about this a while ago when I first started posting. Does Fender and Gibson have tree farms or do they just make deals with different people? Are they treating the wood that they sell them? Lots of questions...
    I'm more with MOP on the whole broken bat thing. There are too many variables including steroids, in that equation. I mean the bats are designed much differently, people are maximizing their bodies and they are training more efficiently in the science of ball hitting... to just chalk up so many things to steroids is sort of missing the whole picture in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2008
  8. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    Well, if you guys watched baseball, then how do you explain all these little shortstops or all these little guys busting bats all over the place? It's not just the big guys.

    It's probably not a fair test, but some guy took an older bat and couldn't break it, but was breaking new ones, one after another. I'd think the old one would've dried out more and become more brittle, but the new ones were breaking. They say MLB is investigating into it to see why there are so many more these days.
     
  9. mojocaster.com

    mojocaster.com Member

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    bats break because of where the ball hits the bat. If it is not on the sweet spot it can shatter the bat.

    Pitchers take steroids too, btw ;)
     
  10. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    I can definitely see steroids being part of it. Another part of it that I didn't know was until '99 it was mostly ash and they say maple breaks more often than ash.

    But it could also be tree farming and less density/growth rings from the trees. Maybe a combination of all these things and more.
     
  11. padavis

    padavis Supporting Member

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    Those little guys arent so little. I mean 6'1 200 pound Chase Utley and 6 foot 200 pound Dan Uggla just do not fit in my mind as little fellas... I mean these dudes are not your recreational softball player 6 foot 200 pounds. I should probably change my other post to focus more on the strength training these people are going through, that maximizes everything their body can give them. Therefore, making themselves, Bigger, Faster and Stronger. The bigger part being relative of course... just my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2008
  12. MOP76

    MOP76 Member

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    Hence, the faster heat.

    The bats are lighter then they use to be. I was listening to an asst. coach on espn talking about this very subject and the lightness of the bats. His theory was that up until the pro level, they're using aluminum bats. It's tougher to jam a guy inside with an aluminum bat because the ball will travel faster and farther when he hits it as opposed to a wooden bat. as you said, guys are making contact below the sweet spot near the handle, shattering the bats.

    It's also the steroids (times the speed of light squared).
     
  13. JMintzer

    JMintzer Burned Out Mod

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    AFA the bats are concerned, they're also making them a bit differently. The current trend is a narrower handle/shaft and a bigger barrel than in days past. This makes for a lighter bat with more mass in the sweet spot. It also results in more shattered bats...


    Jamie
     
  14. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    Very interesting points bro's. Especially about a narrower shaft. That'd do it.

    I gotta think in light of all the steriod busts, players would be chillin' out on it for a bit, compared to a few years ago. Yet supposedly there's more broken bats now than ever.
     
  15. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    I've seen this before and i'd think it's plausable. I think the cooler climate causing denser wood could very well affect the sound. Magnified on a violin, less on an electic guitar.
     
  16. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Of course, about every 18 months there's another "discovery" of why the Strads and Guarneris sounded better - the varnish, the wood, the mini ice age, whatever. I suspect that you age a piece of wood 300 years, you'll see differences in its structure then from how it started out now.

    Maybe in 300 years someone'll run a 1992 Tele and a 2292 Tele (pre-WorldWideConGlomCo - everyone knows they're worth the extra money) through a CT scan and say how consistent the density was of the great woods of the past too.
     
  17. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    Since I'm too lazy to write something different, here's a post of mine from another thread. Same thing.

     
  18. BigPapiFan

    BigPapiFan Member

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    I think you could explain the broken bats as a result of a combination of factors: thinner handles, scooped ends to reduce weight, stronger baseball players, development of late breaking pitches like the slider and the cut fastball, stronger pitchers who on average throw harder than they used to.
     
  19. rainmaker

    rainmaker Member

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    I think it's just the maple. A local guy here said that at BP one day, he saw Mark Texiera break a bat off just above the handle on a check swing without even making contact with the ball. All the guys breaking bats with the Braves are swinging maple.
     
  20. Sebastian

    Sebastian Supporting Member

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    That's what I thought, too, about the bats. An increase in the use of Maple over past years = more breaking bats.
     

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