If my pedalboard has 5 true bypass pedals,do I need a buffer?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by jackroylee, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. jackroylee

    jackroylee Member

    Messages:
    286
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    As the title said,thank you
     
  2. JackStraw12

    JackStraw12 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,614
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    Location:
    Denver
    I believe so. I have a buffer at the beginning and end of my chain and about 6 TB pedals between them. They definitely help with retaining highs.
     
  3. tibbon

    tibbon Member

    Messages:
    1,152
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    Do you currently have a problem with your sound, or does it sound like you want it to sound like?

    If it currently sounds good, then you don't need anything at all. How's it sound in bypass vs going straight to the amp? Keep in mind that as soon as you turn on one pedal, then you essentially will likely have a buffer in place at that point, as almost all pedals have an amplifier stage, and even if it isn't at unity gain it will do the same thing as a buffer essentially.

    One of my friends who have a 30+ pedalboard was able to remove all the buffers from his board and now has no issues after he upgraded his cabling a bit.
     
  4. jackroylee

    jackroylee Member

    Messages:
    286
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2011
    thanks a lot guys,it helps a lot!
     
  5. justnick

    justnick Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,673
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2010
    Location:
    Saint Paul, MN
    Keep in mind that the total length of cable between guitar and amp will be the main factor in any differences you hear, not the number of pedals. So if things are sounding a bit dark you may simple be able to shorten your cable lengths. Or add a buffer to decouple the guitar from subsequent cabling.

    n
     
  6. chervokas

    chervokas Member

    Messages:
    6,864
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2008
    Well, the questions to ask yourself in determining this are: how much cable are you using? What's the capacitance of the cable? Are any of your pedal always on or mostly on? What differences do you hear between your tone plugged directly in vs. your tone plugged into the pedals but with all the pedals switched off?

    In my experience with 5 true bypass pedals and low capacitance cable a buffer isn't a necessity.
     
  7. justonwo

    justonwo Member

    Messages:
    3,096
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2005
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    This is one of those things that is completely empirical. If you play with all your pedals off often and you don't like the resulting loss of highs, then you have your answer. Don't try to create a problem where there isn't one. If you don't like the tone through your pedalboard, then try a buffer.
     
  8. OotMagroot

    OotMagroot Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,417
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    I have 10 true bypass pedals on my 'board. I am running a Toadworks Big Banana buffer first in the chain. The buffer does help with the high-end loss. Is it a night and day difference? Not in my chain (see my sig for my pedal selection). So, I am gonna say - at least with my experience and equipment - that the difference is very small.

    When playing with the other two guys in my power-trio, the difference becomes even more blurred.
     
  9. Michael_V

    Michael_V Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,679
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2010
    Compare your sound when plugged straight into your amp against your sound going through your board with all pedals off. If it sounds better the first way, you need a buffer.

    I have a biggish board with two buffers: one at the beginning in my volume pedal (Thru Tone EB Jr) and one at the end (JHV3 HQ Buffer).
     

Share This Page