if this is the cure, maybe I'll take the disease...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Deed_Poll, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. Deed_Poll

    Deed_Poll Member

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    Pretty cool though!

     
  2. TresGatos

    TresGatos Member

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    I'll take diseases for 400, Alex.
     
  3. Deed_Poll

    Deed_Poll Member

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    This looks good though!

     
  4. TheoDog

    TheoDog Silver Supporting Member

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    Fascinating engineering and fabrication.

    But,
    If you have a fever, there really is one on prescription

     
  5. Ron Kirn

    Ron Kirn Gold Supporting Member

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    ya know... while unique... ya gotta ask yourself... what's fret work gonna cost at some point in the future.. and ns all the music played on plain old skanky normally fretted necks over the past 60 years now obsolete...

    I see it like all these new "tuned" nuts.... a solution for a nonexistent problem..

    Ron Kirn
     
  6. Deed_Poll

    Deed_Poll Member

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    I hear you Ron! But by the same token, why did Leo and Les/McCarty break with tradition? And did the work of Hendrix, Green, Clapton et al make J.S Bach obsolete?

    I agree with what you say about the supposedly equal temperament nuts. I oiled the snake on that one and agree it makes no difference. You are just trading a familiar subtle out-of-tune-ness with an unfamiliar out-of-tune-ness. I still love the guitar but if I was ordering again I'd just get my luthier to put a nice bone nut on it.

    This is really different from that though, and it really sounds better. I am forever avoiding D shapes up the neck as they just don't ring true, not a problem live so much but it really is a pain when recording. So I can really see the benefit for that at least.

    There's a company making replacement Strat necks with the wavy frets, charging $900! Seems a bit pricey to me. I don't see why it can't just be cast or stamped out of steel for $100 and bolted onto a neck shaft like a fretboard.

    One problem is that it will only work for standard tuning, or standard intervals at least. Eb or D standard will not be an issue but open G is off the table.
     
  7. Rob Taft

    Rob Taft Supporting Member

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    I'm almost loath to post in this thread but I get a bit tired of the phrase a "solution looking for a problem". I have a great deal of respect for Mr. Kirn but if we all took this approach we would still be sitting on a horse. By the way, the frets are cast and installed just has any fret would be. On my neck, the slots were cut by Precision Pearl and the frets were installed by Tony Nobles. The fret work was top notch. It is nothing like the compensated nut. It is my understanding that the biggest $$ factor at least as far as TTUSA goes is the licensing fee paid to the company/inventor that came up with the formula.
     
  8. Seth L

    Seth L Silver Supporting Member

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    I personally love the imperfection of the guitar. It's part of it's savage charm. Try a little vibrato.
     
  9. GreenKnight18

    GreenKnight18 Member

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    If wavy frets do catch on, I call dibs on the wavy capo business. You'd need a bunch of different ones like harmonicas.
     
  10. rotlung

    rotlung Member

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    Did you guys watch the OP? It has nothing to do with those tuned frets or perfecting any problem the guitar has. The guy has his guitars built with more than 12 notes per octave to play traditional music from his country. While us westerners are accustomed to 12 notes, many cultures traditionally had completely different scales arranged within the same octave. The various Japanese, Arabic, etc scales some of us use are not comparable to the real deal. The dude modified a western interment to play Turkish melodies, and while it's not my thing, it's definitely cool.
     
  11. Buelligan

    Buelligan Member

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    Yoko has finally found her muse.
     
  12. custom53

    custom53 Member

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    I really want to try one of these out..
     
  13. sears

    sears Member

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    The tune he played on the first guitar was very beautiful.
     
  14. GaryE

    GaryE Member

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    I'm with Rotlung on this one.Maybe it's my Greek heritage showing through ,very cool, definitely not for everyone though…
     
  15. billyguitar

    billyguitar Member

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  16. atquinn

    atquinn Supporting Member

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    I thought that was great. And the guy in the video did a very good job explaining why he is using the fret systems he is using, including answering the question I was thinking (Why not just use a fretless guitar?), seconds after I had thought it :D
    -
    Austin
     

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