I'm idealistic about Les Pauls

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by sorenspete, May 21, 2020.

  1. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    Were it me, given your experience, I'd look at PRS single-cut models, Eastman's take, and others who make an LP-esque model.

    There are plenty of makers who do a great job with that design beyond Gibson.
     
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  2. RobDaglish

    RobDaglish Member

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    ^This. Buy the one that speaks to you. Doesn’t matter what anyone else on here or anywhere else thinks, your instrument is your instrument and nobody else’s.

    Slightly related, a friend of mine was looking for a pair of clarinets (you need different ones for A and Bb tuning). She went to a specialist dealer, and eventually found the one ‘Bb’ with the tone and playability she liked best. Process then starts again, until she finds the ‘A’. When they checked the serials, turns out they both came from the same tree. Point is, she didn’t know, and the dealer didn’t know, but there was something intangible in those instruments that spoke to her and made her pick them over any other.

    I think that shows that there is something in an instrument you connect with, and if you don’t get that connection, forget it, it’s never going to be right for you.
     
  3. Markv7

    Markv7 Silver Supporting Member

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    I definitely think there are good and bad years, specifically around binding work on the necks. The years where they went with a thicker binding on the necks were also the years where we saw a lot of QC issues in binding scraping the fretboard or where the neck wood wasn't flush with the neck binding(you could often find examples where they had a sharp ridge). I think it was probably harder to scrape off. The thicker neck binding also created thicker "nibs" on the frets, and with humidity shrinkage causing strings to get stuck in the gaps between the nibs and metal frets. Now the standards have thinner binding again, true to historic spec. And with that, I've noticed much better neck binding work on the guitars in the stores. I'd try some 2019 standards(50's and 60's Original line), based on neck preference. They are doing a great job with those. Find a lighter one with a nice top, and you'll fall in love with it.
     
  4. tawtaw

    tawtaw Member

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    OP might want to look into the HP models of recent years to find something that plays more like he's used to. Better upperfret access, compound radius and the like might be appointments that fit someone that is used to modern guitars better than a 50s style LP.
     
  5. AlanH

    AlanH Member

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    I predominantly play Ibanez RGs. I have an SG Special Faded and a 2011 LP Studio Tribute. Both have 50s baseball bat necks with low actions and a nice happy medium 12" radius fretboard. What makes them nice for me to play is their low weight. The SG is inherently light but the LP is fully chambered so it's about the same weight. It just feels right on me because of that low weight....

    I would recommend trying a LP model that is chambered (unless you can afford a historic reissue which can also be light due to wood selection). They are just so comfortable to "wear" and can easily be set up to play great.
     
  6. egregion

    egregion Member

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    Just get an Eastman solid body. You wont have any of the negative quirks you might have with the gibbys. Also much cheaper.
     
  7. HoboMan

    HoboMan Silver Supporting Member

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    Funny, I never liked Les Pauls until I got my 2006 Chambered Classic. Weighs 7.6 lbs. Plays and sounds amazing.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. HoboMan

    HoboMan Silver Supporting Member

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    My EC-1000 is one of my all time favorite guitars. Sees way more gigging time than my 4 Gibson Les Pauls.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2020
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  9. joebloggs13

    joebloggs13 Member

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    I own a 2016 Les Paul Studio faded that my wife purchased for me for Christmas. I, like you have always wanted one, but from year to year, didn't know when to take the plunge. That year was 2016 for me. they were killer. I have since upgraded the pups to Monty's custom PAF's, and I would put it up against any LP Standard. Everyone should experience a Les Paul in their lives. :)
     
  10. misterturtlehead

    misterturtlehead Member

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    If I, hypothetically, didn't own a Les Paul right now but wanted to have one I would just wait awhile and save my money until music stores are open in the hopefully not too distant future. When the stores are open I would just go play some Les Pauls. I would go everywhere near me that might have one or more of them. Maybe I might have to try a bunch out or maybe I might find the right one right away. But as long as I am not in a hurry I will try them until I find one that I want to make my guitar.

    For a relatively long time I didn't own a Les Paul. Many were more expensive than what I could afford. In the late 1990s a friend got himself a Gibson Custom Shop Les Paul. It was an "R" model with two humbucking pickups in a cherry finish and with a Bigsby. It was, at the time, the nicest electric guitar I had ever played. I thought that one day I would like to have my own Les Paul when I find another one I like as much as that one.

    A few years later I could afford a Les Paul. I decided to try out some Gibson Custom Shop reissues of 1950s Les Pauls. My favorite fancy guitar store had an R4, R6, R7, and a few sunbursts. They were all really nice. I liked them all. But I was not compelled to buy one. I did find a Les Paul that day in the same store in a different room. I liked it more than the Custom Shops. It was a 1974 Les Paul Deluxe. I still have it. It is awesome. For several years it was my regular gigging guitar.

    Then about three years ago I got a call from a cat with a music store asking me if I had any guitars for sale. I did not. But I looked at his inventory that he posted online. He had a 1957 Les Paul TV Model- not a reissue. It was expensive. So I went through my guitars other than my Les Paul and chose a few that I would consider trading for the TV Model. I ended up trading some guitars for the TV Model and a Gibson R6 goldtop. The TV Model, which I still have, is the most awesome electric guitar I ever played. The R6 was a really good guitar.

    I started playing the TV Model a lot. I occasionally played the R6. I just preferred the TV Model and the Deluxe. While in my favorite not quite as fancy music store I spotted a Gibson Custom Shop R8 double cutaway Les Paul Junior. I asked how much it was. Rather than just giving me a number I was handed the guitar. The neck was awesome. A couple days later I traded the R6 and another guitar for the R8, a Guild M-80, an Orange OR15 head, and an Orange 1x12 cabinet. The R8 and the TV Model are my regular gigging guitars for pretty much all of the music I play on electric guitars including jazz. Both the TV Model and R8 double cutaway Les Paul Junior can jazz.

    The most Gibson-like Les Paul copy I have ever played is my Japanese Greco copy of a 1970s Les Paul Custom with volute on the back of the headstock and witch hat knobs.

    I also have about a 2010 single cutaway Gibson Les Paul Junior that isn't a Custom Shop. It sounds like a Les Paul Junior. I dig it. Though it doesn't quite jazz like my TV Model and R8 do nor is its neck quite as thick.

    And I have an Epiphone. It is a set neck Les Paul Special with two P-90s but has a stop tailpiece and tuneomatic bridge rather than a wraparound bridge. I reckon it is about as nice as my 2010 Gibson Les Paul Junior. It somewhat surprised me. I wasn't expecting much since it was $250. I thought it would be a decent guitar. But I didn't expect to like it as much as I do. It sounds really good.

    My Les Pauls let me show you them.
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  11. misterturtlehead

    misterturtlehead Member

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    men who look like old lesbians
     
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  12. RhytmEarl

    RhytmEarl Member

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    Billy Gibbons would disagree with you about chambered Les Pauls.
     
  13. Pahom

    Pahom Member

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    Objective, subjective, personal opinion, fact or fiction, there is one undeniable truth when it comes to electric guitars and electric guitar playing... EVERYONE sounds like a better guitarist when playing a Les Paul.

    Its unavoidable.
     
  14. Pat6969

    Pat6969 Supporting Member

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    Except Joe Bonamassa!
     
  15. Robm422

    Robm422 Supporting Member

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    I was a strat, ibanez guy until i bought a les paul. I hated it for awhile, and i just kept playing it. Fast fwd a few months and i was totally used to it and felt great. I'd never played a shorter scale guitar before, thats what i think threw me off.
    Just buy one that you like and play it for awhile and see if you grow into it.
     
  16. halcyon

    halcyon Member

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    That's fine. I don't care what Billy Gibbons thinks. :)
     
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  17. cshore

    cshore Member

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    Chambering might be one of the things that would actually make me play a Les Paul. That and a better neck angle, frets that aren't square, gummy feeling neck finishes, rampant tuning issues and wonky upper fret access.

    I'm not really into the single cut thing either way but I sure would rather play a PRS singlecut between the two.
     
  18. rambleon

    rambleon Silver Supporting Member

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    For me, my LPs (and my one SG) are the most comfortable to play. I enjoy playing all my other guitars too, particularly my teles, but when I switch to one of my LPs there’s just this comfortable familiarity and effortless tone that results from that.
     
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  19. microzyma

    microzyma Member

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    This, except I love maple neck Norlins also. Les Pauls are very sensitive to pickup height and how the nut is cut. I've seen many that don't address these basics.
     
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  20. lcfparty35

    lcfparty35 Member

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    These threads are so tedious.
    You and OP should start a YouTube show where you drive around in a Camaro and tell people why they like the guitars they like. If neither of you have a Camaro, a tandem bicycle would do just as well.
     

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