im lost when im studying scales, chords and theory,what can i do???

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by jazzyguy, May 5, 2016.

  1. jazzyguy

    jazzyguy Member

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    hello guys, well tonight im very sad if that the correct word, see im 36 year old i got a degree on family physician after graduated from med school son its been many years of the medicine world, but i always wanted to be a musician, i even went to a conservatory school music 6 month but for some reason i end up or the medical world, so after finish the residency i decided to get back on the guitar so i got a lot of material to study but i really don't now where to start, i know the almost holly pentatonic scale wich everybody knows, also now about the harmonize chords,the intervals, major minor 7th chords, and i got new material about caged system about the chords, modal scales, techniques but i don't know where to start and how to organize my self to study, i know that if put the same discipline and time that i use on themed school i will learn to play in a decent way! i don't have a teacher because he couldn't continues teaching me because of his work, and i was learning very slowly hope that make him decide to quick with me!!!
    can you give some advice of what to study and where to start, also y you can recommend me any material, courses, books..anything, i will appreciate that i really want learn to play.

    Pd because of the dollar currency im not able to pay skip classes (wich was an option until last year)
    :(
     
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  2. old goat

    old goat Member

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    Can you tell us more about yourself--what is the extent of your ability on guitar? what kind of music do you want to play? How best to learn and how much theory you need to know depends a lot on what you want to do. Is finding another teacher an option for you?

    I am also a doctor (retired) who once had musical dreams. People thought I should have been a professional musician. Unfortunately those people were the deans of my medical school, but they did pass me any way and I managed to have a successful career.
     
  3. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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  4. ibis

    ibis Member

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    1 Relax
    2 Find some tunes that you know and have a magic to them that you can't put a finger on. Study their chord structures and melody and have fun unravelling them to find out what speaks to you. Enjoy yourself!

    Put theory into context and it'll make sense.
     
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  5. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Count me out of that. That's a new one on me (I presume I know it by another name ;))
    Well, ask yourself why you actually want to learn to play? When you've learned how to play guitar, what will you be doing with it?
    Here's my guess: playing songs, right?
    There's nothing to stop you doing that right now, you know enough chords. Why turn it into college-style study, or (worse) work? Find a song you really want to play and - if you can't play it yet - learn what you need to play it. That's highly unlikely to require any theory knowledge, unless you see a chord symbol you don't recognise (and don't know how to construct it).
    IOW, treat it as play, as recreation. We use the word "play" for music, because that's what it is, that's the activity it most resembles. It isn't work. It isn't even study, in the usual sense. It's a little like sport, except it's not competitive.
    The point is, you can just go and do it - play music - even when you're not very good - because that's how you get better, by doing it more and more.
    Obviously pick simple tunes first, because getting comfortable with easy grooves is crucial before you tackle anything fancier.
     
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  6. Yossi

    Yossi Member

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    Read, "the music lesson" by Victor Wooten for a fresh understanding of playing music and practice.
     
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  7. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    Two ways to go;

    1. Thinking that learning all the theory and technique will lead you to being a player.

    2. Thinking that learning tunes will lead you to understanding theory and technique.

    #2 works if you hold the attitude "I am a musician. This is how good I am today, and tomorrow I'll be better". It's a positive way to look at it. If you live by the belief that you suck and massive hours of practice seems like Mt Everest, you wont get to your goal any time soon. But to start today with this is how good I am today, tomorrow I'll be better attitude requires no acknowledgement of sucking.

    Plus, music should always be fun, not something to hang failure on.
     
  8. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Silver Supporting Member

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    Learn both tunes and theory. But you don't have to learn it all, all at once.
    Pick a thing to learn, like 5 positions of the major scale (use the caged material) and the notes on the neck.
    then maybe learn diatonic harmony.
    At the same time, learn some tunes in a style you want to play, learn to play it and also try to understand how it works harmonically.
    Then as you go forward. add a "theoretical" thing to learn, and learn more tunes.

    Another approach is to find a good teacher and just take one lesson every 3-6 months, with him/her giving you stuff to work on.
     
  9. Jim Soloway

    Jim Soloway Member

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    In my admittedly obscure little world method one and method two and complete and irrevocably linked. My objective is to play songs but I cannot play songs the way that I want to hear them unless I also know sufficient amounts of theory and technique. I continue to chip away at Mt Everest but most of the time those chips are made in the service of learning a song.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2016
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  10. stevel

    stevel Member

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    Very simply, you need to learn music.

    You know what Bedside Manner is don't you?

    "Theory" is like knowing all the bones in the body.

    That's not "bedside manner" though.

    There's a difference between "treating the symptom" and "treating the disease", and there's a difference between treating the body and treating the mind.

    You now this, right?

    Music - "music" - is a bigger picture. It's the mind. It's bedside manner.

    Obviously, you can't just Frankenstein a bunch of body parts together and expect to have a living, breathing, individual with a life. You can't just learn scales, and chords, and stitch them together and expect to make "music" out of it.

    You need to sit down and talk to your patient at an emotional level, not a "your hemoglobin is down" level.

    You need to learn a piece of music that moves you. You hear something, and say "I'd like to do that", and you learn the piece. NOT the theory behind the piece, but just learn to play the MUSIC.

    When I talk to a person on the street, I don't have to know if they still have their appendix, or tonsils, or gall bladder for that matter. That's not what makes them a "person".

    What makes music "music" is not scales, and chords, and so on and so forth. Just like books are not made up of words, but THOUGHTS and IDEAS, music is made up of the same kinds of things.

    Find music that "speaks" to you, or that "tells a story". And LISTEN to it. Don't try to figure out if it's still got its appendix or not. It doesn't matter.

    Listen to it, enjoy it, try to play it. Don't try to dissect it, don't try to do reconstructive surgery on it. Become emotionally involved (I know that many doctors are not supposed to do that, so this can be hard for you).

    Music needs to move you to listen to it, and to create it. Create - not "assemble".

    Pick a song, learn to play it. Repeat.

    That's how it's done.
    \
    Steve
     
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  11. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Clearly I'm not alone.

    I too can more easily understand theory after learning a tune and then studying the theory in the context of the tune.

    Thinking that you have to learn theory before learning tunes - or at least not learning tunes concurrently with theory - seems to be a common beginner mistake.
     
  12. jazzyguy

    jazzyguy Member

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    good to know you, its very good to to know that you are a doctor, well i like pop, jazz but i really like rock and blues music, i always learn more watching a course i a video o someone playing and then i try to play it to, im looking for a new teacher but in my town there are not so many teachers, about my ability im not sure about that, when i can, i go to a bar to see a band of some friends and i play with them just one or to songs, i love to see the reaction of the people when i play La Grange of ZZ top!!!
     
  13. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    Get;
    1. The Real Book
    2. Mark Levine's Theory book
    3. A metronome

    Those are wonderful compliments to each other.
    All 1+++
     
  14. jazzyguy

    jazzyguy Member

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    i want to be able to play live like a did so many times and improvise over a song in the rhythm and the solo part as well as enjoy playing with the knowledge of what scale i can use for that particular song but without thinking so much that i get lost and don't now what to play because or to much theory!! I've seen some guitar players that said...you play with your heart not with your brain!!!

    right now im working with the modal expose course of Robbie Calvos where im working the mayor and 7th chord their formula, their arpeggio and looking where is the note as well the chord in the fretboard, im thinking to buy the CAGED cracked from Brad Carlton in a way to know exactly all the chord with the arpeggio, scales in all the freeboard
     
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  15. jazzyguy

    jazzyguy Member

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    im looking for that right now ;)
     
  16. amstrtatnut

    amstrtatnut Member

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    This.

    Learn songs. If you want to play jazz, learn every version of tunes by every artist you enjoy. Once your ear begins to make sense of it all, it wont seem so daunting. Trust your ears.
     
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  17. jazzyguy

    jazzyguy Member

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    thats really very inspiring, i really appreciate thats, i will make that chance in order to think that way.... thanks so much
     
  18. jazzyguy

    jazzyguy Member

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    does the real book is about jazz music? i will get the Mark Levines book
     
  19. jazzyguy

    jazzyguy Member

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    i get it i must learn tunes and start from there, i have a song very bluesy call waver from Justin Derrico and i like it a lot!!!
     
  20. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    The Real Book is a collection of many of the greatest standard tunes. That's all it is, tunes. Many, many people that have responded in this thread have the book. Just ask them.
     

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