I'm sick of buying pedals...

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by IronChefChris, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. IronChefChris

    IronChefChris Member

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    so I think I'm just going to build them. Seems logical. I wanted to buy an Analogman Juicer Comp, but it's like $180 (w/ac jack), or I could build my own for about $50 and an extra $20 for a soldering iron and some patience...so imma do that. We'll see how this goes haha. Just sayin.
     
  2. CaptainAwesome

    CaptainAwesome Supporting Member

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    I've built the GGG squeezer and it's great. I'd spend a little more on the soldering iron if you're serious about it though, because you'll get what you pay for in a cheap one.
     
  3. cajone5

    cajone5 Some guy Silver Supporting Member

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    That's my goal this year -- don't buy... build!
    BJFe Folk Fuzz Deluxe, down... next Folk Boost?
     
  4. mcdes

    mcdes Member of no importance

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    Where would I get the gear to build the folk fuzz??
     
  5. Shiny_Beast

    Shiny_Beast Member

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    Y'know I've been collecting parts and building the odd pedal for a couple years now. Some stuff might be cheaper, but if you're after fuzz faces and the like, don't expect to save yourself much of anything building them at home. They are a real PITA to get right, but it is fun, and you do get to build them with old snake oil compnents and stuff like that :).
     
  6. kev1n

    kev1n Member

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    Im slowly transitioning my board to an all diy drive/ boost/ comp section, with only the delays and verbs by big companies.
     
  7. cajone5

    cajone5 Some guy Silver Supporting Member

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    Got a kit from John Fromel but I tried to contact him for another and never heard back so I'm not sure if he's doing them anymore :huh:
     
  8. TheReverendCommon

    TheReverendCommon Member

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    keep us posted on your results!!!!!!!!!!!!

    this is awesome. i've been thinking about going the same route, too.
     
  9. Craig Gates

    Craig Gates Member

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    That's the truth. For the longest time I thought I just couldn't solder - until I borrowed a friend's Weller iron instead of using my crappy Radio Shack iron. A good iron makes all the difference.
     
  10. zosozep7

    zosozep7 Gold Supporting Member

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    Post your soldering irons! Lets see them! Im in on this boat!
     
  11. 13guitars

    13guitars Member

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    :agree

    Grab a Weller WLC100 40 watt iron on amazon for $40 and a Panavise Model 201 for holding the PCBs while you work on them. I believe the investment more than pays for itself in relief from frustration. Soldering is a good skill for any guitarist to have. Even if you don't build a ton of pedals it's good having the proper tools for doing quick repairs on your guitars, pedals and amps.
     
  12. codetocontra

    codetocontra Member

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    Good tips about getting a quality soldering iron.

    You also have to factor in the time to do the projects. Time is money too. Sometimes it isn't quite worth it financially to build your own, but there is a fun factor too. There can be some headaches involved if you put something together and it doesn't work. Worst case scenario is you spend a few dollars and learn a few things about these magical boxes we love to stomp on.

    :dude
     
  13. mmolteratx

    mmolteratx Member

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    I gotta say, if you're DIY'ing pedals to get them cheaper, you're doing it for the wrong reason IMO.
     
  14. 72Telecaster

    72Telecaster Silver Supporting Member

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    Big +1.

    I've built a few pedals, but when I look at the more complex drive pedals or certainly delays it makes me appreciate what I can buy for ~$100. For the time it'd take me I'd just as soon buy the finished product. Not sayin' I don't still enjoy building occasional pedals...but the "cheap" myth was snuffed out for me pretty early on :bonk
     
  15. smallsnd/bigsnd

    smallsnd/bigsnd Member

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    :agree

    parts are relatively cheap (though obviously much cheaper if you're buying bulk) but time spent planning, building and debugging can quickly add up. if you're in it to explore the DIY world, gain some new knowledge, whatever, then great! if you're just looking to save a few bucks, you're probably better off just buying behringer/dano/joyo.
     
  16. TwinkleDaddy

    TwinkleDaddy Member

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    Just one more way you are going to be on the internet and sitting at a table frustrated isntead of actually playing guitar. NOT TROLLING! before anyone jumps on me. Just sayin. I'm happy to spend a few extra bucks on a hand made "boutique pedal" with the sound I want because I want to PLAY IT, not to know how it works. Like people said above, if the reason you are getting into this is to save money, you got the wrong idea.. I'd pick your guitar up and play it instead.
     
  17. rootbeersoup

    rootbeersoup Member

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    I'd only consider making my own pedals if I had something original to bring to the market. It wouldn't be worth my time to make pedals that already exist.
     
  18. codetocontra

    codetocontra Member

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    So you could instantly just learn to make a brand new pedal, full of innovations that no other pedal maker has yet to make, all without ever building a pedal before?? :rotflmao

    We arent talking about mass-marketing pedals. He is simply talking about making some pedals for himself to save a few bucks. DIY approach and all. Im absolutely positive that all the boutique pedal makers and modders got their start by modding and copying existing circuits in their basements and garages. It likely took a bit of experimenting and learning before they started making their own creations. Its not likely those ideas were created after they were standing on a toilet hanging a clock and then fell and hit their head on the sink. :bonk
     
  19. rootbeersoup

    rootbeersoup Member

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    Yes, I am... Glad you got a kick out of it. I didn't say that I would instantly learn it. I would only consider learning how to do it. I'm simply saying, to me, there's no point building something myself unless it hasn't been done.

    Don't know exactly how much you would save by building, say, your own overdrive. But I don't mind paying ~$200 for a good one, all while supporting the efforts of an independent builder.
     
  20. I-IV-V

    I-IV-V Member

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    Oh boy, this could get lengthy. First let me be clear that I'm not an expert at this, I'm a hack. But this is how I see it, maybe it will help.

    When starting out, it can be very frustrating, so be prepared for that. Personally, I think it's worth it. More on that later.

    Building a complete kit (with all parts and complete directions) and just buying a PC board, shopping the parts yourself, and assembling the whole pedal are two completely different things. Probably best to start with a complete kit. Shopping the parts, in itself, can be a real headache until you get used to it.

    If you buy just a PC board, solder the components into it, you still have to wire the switch, jacks, DC jack, and without step by step instructions it can be confusing at first. GGG has great info on this wiring for free at their website. You don't have to buy anything to use it.

    Also, keep in mind that a lot of the projects that have been reverse engineered don't have PC boards available. A lot of those are vero boards, which really aren't that complicated, but can be tricky at first.

    I'd say start with a complete kit, then work into projects that only have a PC board available (shopping your own parts), and eventually you can build some really cool stuff by just looking at a schematic. You can even learn how to make your own PC boards.
     

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