In a Nutshell True bypass?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by iwanthelp, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. iwanthelp

    iwanthelp Member

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    True bybass pedals preserve your tone
    this in theory is an ideal as some pedals can eat your tone

    but...

    I read a lot on here of late of people saying they don't like to run a whole heap of TB pedals together and like to have one buffered pedal in there.....

    why?

    Is it just because the move from affected signal to unaffected will now be to sudden a jump given that your tone will change so much due to the lack of trails on some pedals and so on..... or have I got the wrong end of the stick here?

    Do you essentially need buffers to keep signal strngth up, is true bypass a little bit of a con? I'm not saying it is i'm just asking
     
  2. iwanthelp

    iwanthelp Member

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    Really interesting stuff thanks....
     
  3. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    in a nutshell, put a good buffer at the beginning of the signal chain, and make everything after it true bypass.

    out of the nutshell, fuzz pedals hate buffered signals, so they should go before any buffer. some folks recommend another buffer at the end of the chain as well.
     
  4. aidan7737

    aidan7737 Member

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    True bypass vs otherwise (buffered/mechanical bypass etc), I feel, is important to be aware of. If you are aware of how these things affect the sound and less-talked about feel of your amp you can then design and use a signal path that matches your needs, and is guided by your ears.

    For example, you raise a valid point that perhaps too many TB pedals can have a detrimental effect on your tone. True, but I've arrived at a place where no buffers at all are more desirable than the "on paper" benefits of using a buffer. This is contrary to a lot of prevailing thinking. Again, as long as it is guided by your ears then you'll have no problems. There are no right or wrong answers, plenty of people get great tone with a slew of buffers etc etc, it's all about what works best for YOU, buffers or not...
     
  5. RockStarNick

    RockStarNick Supporting Member

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    ^ I agree with the *feel* aspect of it.

    If I had my eyes closed, and you plugged me straight into my amp, and then plugged me into 2-3 Boss pedals and then into my amp, I could IMMEDIATELY tell the difference. It just feels different.

    But for me, a great buffer up in front, and then true-bypass after that to the amp, is THE way to go. Especially if you're using 20' of cable TO your board, and then another 20' TO your amp.
     
  6. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    well said! you might want buffers, you might not, but if you know the difference, you can actually be in control of your rig and your tone!
     
  7. cvansickle

    cvansickle Supporting Member

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    My pedlaboard is 100% true bypass pedals. I use a VHT Valvulator buffer at the end of the chain, just before the amp. This to me sounds better than having the buffer at the beginning of the chain, most definitely better than using no buffer at all.
     
  8. goldenboy

    goldenboy Member

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    Interesting. I moved my Boss tuner to the end of my line-up from the very first. It smoothed out my Sunlion. But maybe it should go after the Sunlion (my only geranium pedal right now) and before the rest. But, I also have a Boss tremolo in the chain too. so is it better to have a buffer up front and then another or not until the tremolo and the tuner last for a good signal boost to the amp?
     
  9. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    better how? theoretically, you want the buffer first, so you don't get any loss from the pedals. is it that your pedals sound better to you with an unbuffered signal? or maybe having the buffer first, and thus preventing any loss, makes things too bright? i haven't tried this, and i'm curious.
     
  10. cvansickle

    cvansickle Supporting Member

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    Well of course, Walter, "better" is subjective. What I like to hear may not be the "right" way to do things, and may not be what another player likes to hear. I just know for myself, after trying all the possible routs, Valvulator last produces the sound that I like best. My fuzzes, treble boost and wah pedals have more impact on the sound this way, and it sounds to me like there is an even "meatier" straight guitar sound coming from the amp when all pedals are off.
     
  11. Claudio74

    Claudio74 Member

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    I noticed a big loss in highs and a little in punch with all truebypass pedals. If i put a buffered pedal at the begin of the chain, highs are restored but my overdrives sound not so good.
    I solved putting the buffered pedal after all the od's and right before the passive volume pedal: highs are there and od's sound as they should be.
     
  12. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    so your pedals worked better with the unbuffered signal, but having the buffer after them still improved the signal getting to the amp. cool.
     
  13. wc8485

    wc8485 Member

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    Just wanted to make a distinction here.
    There are pedals with buffers in them and there are dedicated buffer pedals. They are not equal, most times. Ie.. a Boss pedal vs. a Valvulator, BS-2, etc.
     

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